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October 20, 1987 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-20

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 20, 1987
.~3.
Seven-term senator Stennis
SwOnt seek ir-election

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) - Sen.
John Stennis, 86-year-old dean of the
r U.S. Senate and third in line to the
presidency, announced yesterday he
will retire at the end of his seventh
term next year because of old age.
The decision by the Democratic
veteran of 40 years in the Senate
touched off an immediate political
scramble in Mississippi over a suc-
cessor, and complicated his party's
prospects of maintaining control over
the Senate, where Democrats hold a
54-46 edge.
Stennis had reported as late as the
summer months that he had not made
up his mind about a re-election race,
and his announcement sounded a sad
note:
"I greatly regret leaving the Senate

where it is my high privilege to
represent the people of Mississippi,
whom I dearly love and respect," he
said, "but age and health control.
My heart says 'yes,' run again, but
my best judgment says 'no."'
Stennis, who was shot and
wounded by robbers in 1973 and has
been confined to a wheelchair since
he lost his left leg to cancer in 1984,
noted that he would be 93 at the end
of an eighth term.
Stennis made his announcement
through his Jackson office after
surgery at Walter Reed Army Medical
Center at Washington for what was
described as a routine prostate pro-
cedure to relieve a partial obstruction
of his bladder.
In Washington, Senate Majority

Leader Robert Byrd said the announ-
cement by Stennis "is tantamount to
the proclamation of the end of an era.
"In his 40 yearts in the United
States Senate, John Stennis was at
the center of, of a vital participant in,
some of the most momentous
decisions and legislative efforts in
modern American history," said Byrd
(D-W.Va.)
S tennis, who first won a special
1947 election after the death of the
arch-segregationist Sen. Theo Bilbo,
is president pro tempore of the
Senate and thus third in line to the
presidency.
He becomes the fourth senator to
decide against seeking re-election
next year.

Stennis
... will not seek re-election.

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10% OFF our already low prices with this coupon.

Hart speech on campus
costs UAC money

(Continued from Page 1)
speech did not sell out and Cone
attributes this to the high prices.
"The ticket price represented
inexperience, I think," he said.
Green said ticket revenues
accounted for about 20 percent of the
costs, she said.
The rest, according to Green, will
come out of the UAC budget. UAC
gets about $2 from all full-time
students each semester, according to
Speta. This source of revenue
generates $130,000 to $150,000 for
the organization each year, he said.

UAC's actual operating budget is
larger; it draws on profits from
plays, movies, Laughtrack,
Soundstage, and other UAC
productions, Speta said.
UAC would not give a figure for
the total expense of Hart's visit.
Cone was also unhappy with
Hart's change of topic. It had been
advertised as a speech on "The State
of Democracy in America" but Hart,
at the last minute, changed his topic
to present his version of the nation's
policy agenda.

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..-... - '
EATERIES &
COMMONS
CALL MARK STEPHENS
AT 763-9484
The University of Michigan is an
equal opportunity, non-discriminatory,
affirmative actin employer.

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paying student manager positions
Benefits include
" Flexible hours
" No weekends!
- Close by 5:00-no evenings!
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"50% off food the days you work
- Free passes to most University Club events

FORD FOUNDATION
DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS
FOR MINORITIES
Applications are now available
in Room 160,
Rackham Building.
For Ph.D. candidates who are
citizens or nationals of the U.S.
at the time of application.
DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 13,1987

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
Schultz meets with Hussein
LONDON - U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz met with King
Hussein of Jordon yesterday to try to find a formula for peace talks
between Hussein and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
Hussein has proposed Middle East peace talks be held within the
framework of an international conference, but Shamir objects to Soviet
participation.
"We are looking for ways that will meet everyone's objections to get
into the direct negotiations," Shultz added. "But so far we haven't found
that answer."
Shultz helped coordinate yesterday's military operation against Iran and
the U.S. diplomatic follow-through, while holding talks in the Middle
East with Israeli, Saudi and Egyptian leaders.
Earlier yesterday in Cairo, Egypt, Shultz said that Israel and Egypt
have a genuine interest for peace, but that his Middle East visit broke no
new ground towards that goal.
Deaver' s perjury trial begins
WASHINGTON - Jury selection began yesterday in the perjury trial
of Micheal Deaver, as the Supreme Court rejected the former White
House aide's bid to allow attorneys in the case to question prospective
jurors in private.
The Supreme Court without comment rejected Deaver's argument that
allowing public questioning of jurors would jeopardize his chances of
getting a fair trial.
Deaver, former deputy White House chief of staff, is charged with
lying to a federal grand jury and a House subcommittee that investigated
his lobbying activities for alleged ethics law violations.
The list of possible witnesses includes both President Reagan and his
wife, Nancy, both close friends of Deaver's, as well as a host of current
and former senior administration officials such as Secretary of State
George Shultz, Treasury Secretary James Baker, Attorney General Edwin
Meese III and Defense Secretary Casper Weinberger.
Goetz to be jailed for 6 months
NEW YORK - Subway gunman Bernhard Goetz was sentenced
yesterday to six months in jail, ordered to undergo psychiatric treatment
and fined $5,000 by a judge who rejected recommendations that he be
allowed to go free.
Goetz, who shot four youths on a subway nearly three years ago, stood
impassively as acting state Supreme Court Justice Stephen Crane
sentenced him on the single gun possession count of which he was
convicted.
The crime carries a maximum penalty of seven years in prison, though
first-time offenders like Goetz rarely go to jail.
Goetz was also sentenced to five years of probation and 280 hours of
communtiy service at New York Medical Center.
First lady recovering well
WASHINGTON - Nancy Reagan, "feeling just great" two days after
breast-cancer surgery, got a get-well basket of cookies and a big kiss from
President Reagan yesterday as she continued a rapid recovery, her
spokesperson said.
"She'll be coming home soon," Reagan called out to reporters as he
left the White House for his fourth visit to Bethesda Naval Medical
Center in nearby Maryland.
The president's physician, John Hutton, issued a statement earlier in
the day saying the first lady's recovery "is continuing very well and she
fells wonderful."
EXTRAS
Coffee boxes in Seattle man
SEATTLE - William Weir's house may cramp his style, but the
view is terrific.
For a week now, Weir has lived inside a billboard, waving to
passers-by, from his perch 25 feet above one of Seattle's busiest
thoroughfares.
Weir is getting paid - he won't actually say how much - by a
coffee company to cram himself into 176 square feet of living space for
32 days.
But it isn't as rough as it sounds. He eats catered gourmet meals. He
hauls up messages and gifts in a gym bag tied to a rope, and a delivery
box dangles to await the morning newspaper. A cot sits in a small back
room when he wants to retreat from the narrow, glass-paned front.
"In some ways it's almost like being a zoo exhibit," said Weir, a 26-
year-old actor.

There's no question the stunt has drawn attention. His phone rang
during an interview Saturday, messages from anonymous supporters are
pinned to the wall and the hoarseness of his voice illustrates the strain
of talking to passers-by.
Weir said he gets as much satisfaction fron the uniqueness of the job
as he does from being a magnet that draws people to a food-bank
donation truck parked below.
0Zhe Miclhigan 1uaiIgI.
Vol. XCVIII - No.29
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$25 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term: $13
in Ann Arbor; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub -
scribes to the Los Angeles Times Syndicate and the National Student
News Service.

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Think there's no
place in business
for someone
with a liberal
arts degree?
Think again.

A Master's from The Annenberg School of Communica-
tions, combined with your bachelor's degree, can take
you into a management career in the mass media or
telecommunications.
Here's what some recent graduates of Annenberg's
Master's in Communications Management are doing:
Suzanne B., B.A., French, U.C. Berkeley
Vice President, Programming Sales, ABC Radio
Steve B., B.A., Fine Arts, Ohio University
Senior Vice President, Creative Affairs,
Columbia Pictures-TV
Paul D., B.A., English, U. Michigan
Manager, Marketing and Public Policy, Pacific Bell
Sara K., B.A., Political Science, Duke
Director, Creative Services,
Assoc. of TV Programming Executives
Pam R., B.A., Asian Studies, Mount Holyoke
Director, Public Relations,
St. Paul Medical Center
Karl K., B.A., Economics, USC
Senior Telecommunications Consultant,
Price Waterhouse
Wendell F., B.A., Radio/TV/Film, Northwestern
Manager, Audience and Syndication Research,
Walt Disney Co.
HERE ARE TWO WAYS The Annenberg School,
University of Southern California, Los Angeles,
prepares graduates for their careers.
Course work in...
9 . management of media firms

. communications technologies
. law and public policy
" international communications
" diffusion of innovations
" communication in organizations
On the job learning...
" internships in Los Angeles
and Washington, D.C.
. job placement, while in school and after
" access to alumni network

2*

Editor in Chief......................................ROB EARLE
Managing Editor................................AMY MINDELL
News Editor ..........................PHILIP I. LEVY
City Editor.................. MELISSA BIRKS
Features Editor ......................MARTIN FRANK
University Editor..........................KERY MURAKAMI
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Francie Arenson, Vicki
Bauer, Eve Becker, Steve Blonder, Keith Brand, Jim Bray.
Dov Cohen, Hampton Dellinger, Kenneth Dintzer, Nancy
Driscoll, Sheala Durant, Heather Eurich, Stephen Gregory,
Linda Hecht, Grace Hill, Jeff Hughes, Steve Knopper,
Carrie Loranger, Michael Lustig, Alyssa Lustigman, Tom
MacKinnon Andrew Mills'Peterim"r, Eugene Pak, Lisa
Pollak, Jim Poniewozik, Melissa Ramsdell, Martha
Sevetion, Rachel Stock, Steve Tuch, David Webster, Rose
Mary Wummni.
Opinion Page Editors........................PETER MOONEY
HENRY PARK
Assoc. Opinion Page Editor..........CALE SOUTHWORTH
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Muzammil Ahmed, Rosemary
Chinnock, Noah Finkel, Jim Herron, Eric Holt, Josh Levin,
I. Matthew Miller, Mocha, Jeffrey Rutherford, Steve
Semenuk, Tony Sherman, Mark Weisbrot.

Film................................JOHN SHEA
Theatre...... .........AMY KOCH
ARTS STAFF: John Casson, Scott Collins, Robert
Flaggert, Timothy Huet, Brian Jarvinen, Avra Kouffman,
John Logie, Daniel Rosenberg, Mike Rubin, Lauren
Shapiro, Mark Swartz, Marc S. Taras.
Photo Editors...............................SCOTT LITUCHY
ANDI SCHREIBER
PHOTO STAFF: Karen Handelman, Ellen Levy, Robin
Loznak, David Lubliner, Dana Mendelssohn, John Munson,
Cara Saffro, Grace Tsai.
Weekend Editors................REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
ALAN PAUL
CARTOONISTS: Aaron Chassy, Fred Zinn.
Business Manager....................REBECCA LAWRENCE
Sales Manager...................................ANNE KUBEK
Assistant Sales Manager.....................KAREN BROWN
SALES STAFF: Gail Belenson, Sherri Blansky, Julio
Bowers, Valerie Breier, Pam Bullock, Stephanie Burg,
Milton Feld, Kim Feuerstein, Lisa George, Michelle Gill,
Missy Hambrick, Ginger Heyman, Matt Lane, Jodi

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