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October 19, 1987 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-19

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The Michigan Daily-Monday, October 19, 1987- Page 3

Number of
students
*enrolked
increases
By DAVID WEBSTER
The total number of students
enrolled in the University increased
again this year.
There are now 49,523 students
enrolled in the University, including
its Dearborn and Flint campuses,
according to a report compiled by the
Associated Press. That figure is up
331 students from last year.
One University official said
there are about 35,500 graduate and
undergraduate students on the Ann
Arbor campus.
The University's total enrol-
lment has continued to increase over
the last few years despite a nation-
wide decline in the number of
graduating high school students. One
reason for this is that applications to
the University have not decreased
over the same period.
"We have not really seen a
downturn in the number applicat-
ions," said Robert Holmes, assistant
vice president for academic affairs.
The University has the highest
enrollment of the 13 public colleges
and universities in the state, the
report said. Michigan State has the
second highest enrollment with more
than 42,000 students.

hiag shanty torn down

By STEPHEN GREGORY
One of two Diag shanties built by
the Free South Africa Coordinating
Committee was torn down over the
weekend, University Public Safety
officials said.
Public Safety Officer John
Warming said the shanty was razed
sometime Saturday night and that his
office currently had no suspects in
the incident.
Pam Madison, an FSACC
member and LSA junior, said the
destruction of the shanty is a n
indication of "a lot of racist violence
on campus." She said it also
indicates that people are still unaware
of the shanty's significance.
"I think it's important for people
to educate themselves about what's
going on - in South Africa. (The
shanty) reminds us of the conditions
people all over the world live under."
Among the shanty's boards and
steel support beams were a broken

radio, a banner which said "Casino,"
and posters from Sigma Nu and
Theta Chi fraternities.
Sigma Nu President Jim Doyle,
an LSA senior, said, "I am confident
that no one in our house was
involved and that no on is trying to
implicate us (in the incident)."
Doyle said Sigma Nu members
plastered posters all over the Diag
during fraternity rush three weeks ago
and that some one may have ripped
them down and thrown them in the
shanty.
Eric Holt, a United Coalition
Against Racism member and
engineering senior who helped build
'the shanty last spring, said there was
a two-foot by two-foot hole on one
side of the shanty and said, "It's
possible someone could have just
shoved (the posters) in there."
Members of Theta Chi fraternity
could not be reached for comment.
Madison called on the University

administration and the Michigan
Student Assembly to publically
condemn the incident.
MSA President Ken Weine said
the assembly has condemned
"violent acts of racism" on camptis
in the past, but he said he couldn't
predict MSA's response to this
incident.
She also said she FSACC was
going to try to rebuild the shanty:
sometime today.
The first shanty, which went up:
in March 1986, and the second, built;
last winter, have been the targets of
several attacks. Last spring, students'
collected boards from the shanties in;
a scavenger hunt allegedly sponsored
by three engineering societies.

Read and Use

Daily

Classifieds

Daily Photo by KAREN HANDELMAN
Talking to plants
Basil Osborn, a gardener from Montreal who is visiting Ann Arbor,
examines a dwarfed tree called a Bonsai at the Bonsai Expedition at the
Botanical Gardens this weekend.

U' ranks 8th in college poii

By JAMES BRAY
The University graced the ranking of the nation's
top 10 colleges and universities at number eight, tied
with the University of Chicago, according to a poll of
college presidents nationwide.
Stanford University of California took :the pole
position at number one followed in order by Harvard,
Yale, Princeton, University of California at Berkeley,
Dartmouth, Duke, the University and University
Chicago tied for eighth place, and Brown.
The University and the University of California at
Berkeley were the only public universities to be ranked
in the top 10.
Keith Molin, Assistant to the Vice President and
Director of Capital Projects, said, "The rating is a
tremendous compliment to the University." Molin
attributes the ranking to "tremendous achievements in
the last few years." Among those achievements, Molin
mentioned new facilities, additions to the faculty, and
the quality of the student body.
The survey is produced biennially by the news-
magazine U.S. News and World Report; 1,329 college

presidents were surveyed this year with a 60 percent
response rate. Each president was asked to list the 10
schools which offer the best undergraduate education.
The colleges were divided into nine catagories according
to their classification by the Carnegie Foundation for
the Advancement of Teaching.
In 1983, the Universty ranked seventh in the survey,
citing the small school atmosphere provided by the
Residential College. The University fell from the ranks
of the top 10 in the 1985 survey, mentioned only as
noteworthy. The University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill was the only school to fall from its top 10.
ranking in 1985, ousted by the University's return.
LSA junior Jennifer Loeb said,"It's pretty accurate
to be ranked in the top 10. As far as public
universities, this is probably the finest."
From the way people study here I can see it. But
from my own personal life I don't understand it," said
LSA junior Jamie Verrico.

First
lady
expects
recovery
WASHINGTON (AP)- Doctors
told President and Nancy Reagan
yesterday that the finaltests from her
breast cancer surgery show there has
been no spread of her cancer and that
the "prognosis for full recovery is
excellent," a White House
spokesperson said.
"Mrs. Reagan is recovering
remarkably well from surgery,"~
Reagan's physician John Hutton said
in a statement. Hutton said Mrs.
Reagan's 12-physician team is
"completely satisfied with her
progress in every respect."
The president traveled b y
helicopter to Bethesda Naval Medical
Center early yesterday morning to
await the final test results from
Saturday's surgery.
The first couple received the news
about the final tests at midmorning,
then spent time looking at the
flowers that had been sent to the first
lady and the get-well cards that have
been pouring in, White House spokes
person Marlin Fitzwater said.
ON

Students Dedicated to
Knowing and
Communicating
Jesus Christ!

SCornerstone

Pastor Mike Caulk
Diag Evangelist
Tuesdays
7 p.m.
2231 Angell Hall
971-9150

CHRISTIAN

L

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FELLOWSHIP

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Name
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Grievaw
By EVE BECKER
The head of faculty's governing
body is unsure what action will be
taken in response to a student's
charge that a University professor
sexually assaulted her.
Harris McClamroch, chair of the
faculty's Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs said his
committee, as the faculty's gov-
erning body, could not comment on
the case against University professor
Thomas Rosenboom unless the case
was brought to the group in an
official appeal.

procedurt
Although the student's report has
gone through channels in the
University, she said she is unsure if
her complaint has been accurately
filed because of the complexity ofi
grievance procedures.;
Complaints of sexual harrassment
or of discrimination can be filed
through the Office of Affirmative
Action, the ombudsman, or the
student's dean or department head.
The procedures for each school and1
college differ slightly, but each fol-
low the same base model procedure.1
McClamroch said that SACUA

complex
will not get involved with this
specific case, because it is a policy
making body. Also, the group does
not want to comment.now because
the case may come in front of
SACUA if it goes through the
University grievance process.
According to Washtenaw County
court records, the woman, an LSA
senior, was entering her house on
Sept. 12 when a white male attacked
her. About 10 days later, the woman
identified her alleged assailant when
he entered her place of work.
The woman said she has threaten-
ed a civil suit, but has not yet filed.

Do Something
For Yourself.

C'

1

91

t '
y
+ti 111

State-
College
ARY home miss

I

--.ddpr

1170 Broadway
663-4896

THE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

a
;.

r~Y~V~6N 6\ /0

Campus Cinema
Menage (Bertrand Blier, 1986). 7:30
and 9:15 p.m. Michigan Theatre.
Soft Is the Heart of the Child.
4:30 p.m. MLB 3.
Speakers
David Noel Freedman - "Ashera
Yahweh and his Asherh." 4 p.m., 3050
Frieze.
Eunice Thurman - Washtenaw
Association for Retarded Citizens. 7:30
p.m., Sheraton University Inn, 3200
Boardwalk.
Evolution and Human Behavior
Program - Observational methods in
human ethnology. 1521b Rackham,
noon.
Melissa Bowerman -
"Overproductivity and the 'No negative
evidence' problem: How do children cut'
back on rules with lexical exceptions."
3050 Frieze, noon.
Joel Miller - "Organic and

Meetings
Land, human rights, and U.S.
militarization in Honduras -
Kuenzel room, 8 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
- 3rd floor League, 7:15 p.m.
Asian-American Association -
Trotter House, 7 p.m.
Circle K - Room C, League. 7 p.m.
Furthermore
Career Planning and Placement
- ."Polishing your resume to
perfection. 4:15 p.m., CPP.
Career Planning and Placement
- Strategic Planning Associates
employer presentation. 4 p.m., Kuenzel
room.
HBO Special - AIDS video festival,
C. Everett Koop answers phone in
questions. Public Health I lunchroom,
noon.
Safewalk - 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Rm
102 UGLi, 936-1000.

.4
p
O,
4
r

Attention
Faculty and Ph.D. Candidates
Vnutnm A na rnm ArAnmarl., 11107~ (I ' AT U

Send announcements of un-

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