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October 16, 1987 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-16
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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MICH.ELLANY

Don't bl
Two weeks ago I ran into Gary
Hart in the basement of the Union.
I shook his hand, not because I was
terribly excited by the prospect of
meeting one of the finest political
minds of my generation, but
because I saw in that moment the
opportunity for a cheap laugh.
Anybody interested in shaking the
hand that shook the hand that
allegedly did things to Donna Rice
which allegedly were not in the best
interests of the alleged Hart
campaign can do so simply by
approaching me and giving me a
quarter. Let's face it, it's as close as
many of us will ever get to Donna
Rice. (Not that I care, but I know
there are some out there, besides
Gary, who have a profound interest
in Ms. Rice. I saw her on the cover
of People magazine.)
Shortly thereafter I found out
why Gary was in the basement of
the Union. No, he hadn't made the
trip from Colorado to sample the
Egg McMUG. He had just finished
speaking at the Power Center and
was on his way to a party in his
honor. A lot of students had paid $5
to hear one of Gary's left-over
campaign speeches, and help pay
off Gary's dirigible-sized campaign
debts. As a special added attraction,

ime

us'

JOHN
LOGIE
Hart commented on a popular
theme - the damage the media is
doing to Presidential campaigns.
Hart spoke of the questions which
should never be asked of
Presidential candidates, and of how
the real issues are being obscured
by a media which relentlessly seeks
out peccadilloes and warts.
This theme has been echoed by
Gary's fellow casualty, Joseph
Biden, who quit the race when it
was discovered that he h a s
plagiarized various materials
throughout his adult life. And
lately, Pat Robertson has been
suggesting the media ought not
point out that his first child shared
Mom's piece of the wedding cake.
And on certain points, I am in
agreement with these gentlemen. If
Gary Hart and his wife have certain
agreements or understandings which
allow for Gary to indulge his
desires on those long campaign
swings, that's fine. If Pat

andidates
Robertson and his wife just
couldn't wait, that's fine too. But
the suggestion that there are some
questions that the media shouldn't
ask is ludicrous, and the
(ex)candidates are using a "right-to-
privacy" argument to dodge the
immense hypocrisy revealed by the
discoveries about them.
First off, once one throws a hat
into the ring, it is reasonable to
expect that all manner of ludicrous
questions will be asked. While
many Americans base their
decisions on political issues, many
more base their decisions on such
vagaries as personal appearance,
"morality", and possibly even
bowling average, as recent results
attest. If a candidate feels
uncomfortable divulging the true
answer to a question, it seems
reasonable to demand a diplomatic,
clever, or challenging response
which somehow puts the issue to
rest. These skills are virtually
indispensable for a good President.
It's not unreasonable to demand
them of candidates.
Barring cleverness, diplomacy, or
an informed challenge, I call upon
candidates to lie effectively -
another skill which Presidents have
See LOGIE, Page 9

FILM.
Reiner continues to expand, succeed with 'The Princ
By John Shea

David Tibbals
Drake's Manager intends to preserve
the restaurant's 58 year history.
INTERVIEW

Twenty-six year old David Tibbals is working hard to keep a family-
owned Ann Arbor tradition alive. He is the manager-soon-to-be-owner
of Drake's Sandwich Shop, which has been serving good old-fashioned
favorites to hungry Ann Arborites for 58 years. Located on North
University, the shop is asfamousfor its preservation of the past as it is
for its wide array of candies and imported teas. Daily staffer Pam
Ruderman talked to Tibbals about the history behind his grandfather's
shop which makes Drake's the unique and nostalgic University
landmark that it is.
Daily: When did Drake's open?
Tibbals: In 1926.
D: Who were the original owners?
T: My grandfather, T.A. Tibbals, bought it from the Drake brothers in
1929.
D: How have your grandparents preserved the original character of
Drake's through the years?
T: They didn't change anything. My grandfather kept things the way he
wanted it basically. Lots of people said "you should do this", and "you
should do that", but he just left it the way he wanted it. He knew it
would be nostalgic after years. People come in that went to school here
thirty-five years ago and they go "Oh look, it hasn't changed at all!"
Most of them are shocked that it's still the same owners, or at least the
same family now that I'm here.
D: There haven't been any changes since it was originally built?
T: Just these shelves with candy jars were put in in 1963 instead of
two booths that we were using.
D: What is the history behind the Martian Room upstairs?
T: It was just an extra room for seating that my grandfather built in
1936. How they got the name is pretty interesting. They had a raffle to
see what the most popular name for it would be. People wrote down the
name of what they thought it should be and then put it in a drop
bucket. The Martian Room is the name that came up the most. All the
people who wrote down Martian Room got a prize.
D: Is the Martian Room still used today?
T: Yes, we use it every day. We don't use it during the summer, but
during the school year we need the seating. We usually open it just
before lunch and then try to get it cleaned up and closed by 4 p.m.
D: Drake's has been known to employ some-unusual business tactics.
What are some unusual practices still used today?
T: Most of our employees are students - if not all of them - so
everybody is tax exempt. We pay everybody every day. The only taxes
they get taken out is social security pay. I guess that's a pretty strange
business tactic.
D: Why did your grandfather institute this practice?
T: I guess there was a time when he couldn't pay the paychecks, so he
paid everybody from the cash register and he's been doing that ever
since. S9,,everybody gets their money when they're supposed to.
See INTERVIEW, p. 12

OFF THE WALL
Why is there racial discrimination?
Men and women should be judged on
their qualities and character - not
color.
(in reply)
TELL THAT TO THE
UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS
DEPARTMENT.
-Graduate Library
Progress is a lie
-wall of South 'U' Complex
I am taking a survey. Does sitting in
this room and studying for 6 hours
make you fell unbelievably horny?
-Graduate Library
If UFO's exist, then planets with
their like forms exist. If that's so
then the earth is just a miniscule
portion of the universe, and
subsequently Ann Arbor is even less
important.
Basically, what all that means is that
I - one small part of Ann Arbor -
shouldn't worry about the fact that I
failed even one smaller lousy course.
(in reply)
YES, BUT IF YOU SPEND YOUR
WHOLE LIFE PONDERING
YOUR OWN INSIGNIFICANCE,
YOU WILL NEVER HAVE A
CHANCE TO DO ANY GOOD,
HAVE ANY FUN.
-Graduate Library

SKEICIWAb

SZINN

N M TLL INN TiY! o M , joy
rL ~ w W~~ gtS esAm M .U 'E 4./, h4JA TO o

Once upon a time, in the Land of.;
Misfit Television Actors, there sat
Rob Reiner. He was a pretty ugly-
looking toad, resting next to McLain
Stevenson and Redd Foxx, and
begging anyone who came by for a
chance to get off his syndicated
stump. Few listened. And those who
did only stopped to ask, "Hey.
Aren't you Meathead?"
Meathead. Try and say it without
cracking a disdainful grin. But in
just a few short, remarkable years,
beginning with 1983's This is
Spinal Tap, Reiner has fought out of
the Land of Misfits. He hasn't
looked back since, with follow-ups
The Sure Thing and Stand by Me.
Not only has he gotten off his
stump, but he has evolved into a
beautiful prince with a strong sense
of what works and what does not.
Allow me to get this out of the
way. The Princess Bride, Reiner's
fourth feature film, is precious. It is
a wonderful movie-going experience
and it is not to be missed. Based on
the 1973 novel of the same name by
William Goldman, it is a project
brimming with confidence and
backed by talent. Cameos by Billy
Crystal and Peter Falk givethe film
big names; Goldman, a two-time
Oscar winner (Butch Cassidy and the
Sundance Kid, Marathon Man.)
wrote the screenplay. And behind the
camera directing is Reiner himself.
The Princess Bride opens with a
concerned grandfather (Falk) coming
to sit with his sick godson (Fred
Savage). The boy is bedridden with
the flu, and the Grandfather wants to
cheer him up by reading him a book
aloud. The little boy wants nothing
to do with the old man; he'd rather
get back to his video games. But
Falk is persistent.
"Trust me," he says. "The book
has everything: Fencing. Fighting.
Torture. Revenge. Giants. Monsters.
Chases. Escapes. True love.
Miracles." .
The young boy is marginally
impressed, and Falk begins to narrate
the tale; we see what the boy
imagines.
This seemingly complicated tale
starts off as Westley the farmboy
(Cary Elwes) tells the young fair
maiden Buttercup (Robin Wright)
that he is madly in love with her.
She reciprocates, but Westley then
must leave her to go off into the
world and make his fortune so he can
support her.
Five years pass, and Westley still
has not returned; Buttercup believes
her love is dead. Making her life
even more miserable is the evil
Prince Humperdinck (Chris
Saradon), who announces to his
kingdom that the beautiful maiden

Though skeptical, grandson Fred Savage is coerced into listening to grandfathjer Peter Falk's favorite childhoo

will be his wife. Buttercup clings to
the hope that her Westley is still
alive and will come save her.
Running along side this story is
the talerof Inigo Montoya (Mandy
Patinkin), a brilliant Spanish
swordsman longing to avenge the
death of his father. He has been
looking for the killer, without
success, for 20 years. So, in passing
the time, he joins an ill-fated band of
kidnappers headed by Vizzini
(Wallace Shawn, My Dinner With
Andre). The group's next target the
Prince's bride.
There is a lot going on, and if it
seems confusing, that's because it's
difficult to do the story justice.
Goldman's screenplay is a tightly
constructed fairy tale that just whips
along. Kids will love the fantasy and
the quirkiness of the characters;
adults will like those as well as the
story's slightly bent nature.The
Princess Bride is a light-hearted
satire, almost in a self-depreciating
manner.
This is not an easy feat, creating
a film that will send both eight and
80 year-olds skipping into the
parking lot. An inexperienced
filmmaker probably would have
mishandled such a project, either by
allowing the material to disintegrate

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...hearing a tale of young lovers Cary Ewles and Robin Wright

PAGE 8
1 3

WEEKEND/OCTOBER 16, 1987

WEEKEND/OCTOBER 16-198T
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