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October 16, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-16

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The Michigan Daily--Friday, October 16, 1987- Page 5

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN--ANN ARBOR
HISTORIC RSIDENC YMIX

Budget request cites state service

100

80 ~-
60 -

40
20

PERCENT NON-RESIDENT

L.14 "I L ' t A 'jJ ' ' L L LjL-L -1 . I' I
1860 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980
Offce of Academic Planning and Analysis
7-13-1 987
Source:Office of The Registrar Reports
The graph shows that although the percentage of non-resident students at
the University dropped during the baby boom of the 1960s, it is currently
on the rise due to the decreasing number of Michigan high school studen-
ts.

By MARTH tSEVETSON
FLINT - Every autumn, the
University's budget request stresses
what it wants from the state.
But this year, the budget request
is different. University officials are
highlighting what it gives back to
the state.
"The people of Michigan have
got to understand what they are get-
ting for their investment in the Uni-
versity of Michigan," said Univer-
sity Regent Thomas Roach (D-
Saline). "We do a tremendous
amount of things. The problem is
that a lot of people don't know we're
doing it."
Within two weeks, Vice President
for Academic Affairs and Provost
James Duderstadt was able to com-
pile a list of more than 200 public
srie sprojects sponsored by the
writing programs at state high

'U im o
schools, research projects to help
General Motors plants, and local en-
vironmental programs.
"This is just a sampling of short
vignettes that represent the diversity
of ways we serve the state of Michi-
gan," Duderstadt told the Univer-
sity's Board of Regents. "Fewer than
10 percent of the units have reported
in.".
Duderstadt said the impetus to
compile the list came from concern
among the regents that stringent
economic policies in the early 1980s
cut back the University's commu-
nity service programs.
The need to emphasize such pro-
grams grew more intense last sum-
mer as state legislators became con-
cerned that the University was not
fulfilling its role as a state institu-
University officials deny that a

direct connection between the public
service list and the conflict over out-
of-state enrollment levels exists, but
acknowledge that the report is in-
tended to smooth state relations that
were ruffled in June.
"Our case has not been well-made
in the the past to the legislature
about all of the things the Univer-
sity does for the state," said Regent
Paul Brown (D-Petoskey). "We at-
tract a lot of talent and brain power
to the state of Michigan, much of
which stays here."

Univrity official agree that the
important asmtheufate' rneconomy
technology and service industries.
"Michigan will become even1
more dependent, we believe, on the
technology of its research institu-
tions," Duderstadt said.
Roach agreed, "(The University)
is an investment. This is the way
Michigan is going to be great for
our children and grandchildren."
Once the final list is completed,
Duderstadt said he will publish it on
MTS, the University's computer
message system.

PRE-LAW
DAY

Academic Afairs an Provost James
Duderstadt explained the University's
rationale for its current residency
mix. The regents will use Duder-
stadt's final report - which will be
released in about seven weeks - as
a framnework for the their position
during the committee discussions.
Duderstadt said the enrollment ra-
tio has not significantly changed in
the history of the University. Al-
though out-of-state enrollment de-
creased when Michigan's population
surged during the baby boom, the
current ratio of 36 percent non-resi-
dents is "not surprising," he said.
Regent Paul Brown (D-Petoskey)
agreed. "I think that legislators tend
to react to whatever percentage you
say as being too high," he said. "But
if they think about it and get a his-
torical perspective on it, they'll see
our percentage is what ir has always
been."
teringthe nn-esident enrollmen
ity of the studa oyI is our be
lief that a shift in out-of-state en-
rollment by one to two percent will
have an impact on the quality of our
incoming class," he said.
pIn addition, Duderstadt said that
out-of-state students are not subsi-
dized by state funds; they pay their
own costs through higher tuition
rates. Limiting the number of non-
residents enrolled would not reserve
Bron aidta u-fstaefn-

ing - from tuition and research
grants - makes the University "the
best investment" the state can make.
"We attract two dollars from out-of-
state for every dollar the state gives
us," he said. "No other college in the
state does anything like that."
University officials agree that if
the University did accept more in-
state students, the declining number
of Michigan high school graduates
would leave other state universities
ad college gssrappling to fill their

0

VISIT WIH ADMISSIONS OFFICERS
LAW SCHOOLS. INFORMATION ON
CAE OORTEUNITIES AN MORE.

S"where'd you get that Card?"
I ,,
i "htcard?"
S"that card!"

U

silly, funny, happy, sad, sentimental, personal,
friendly, flirty, go-get em, good luck, get well,
gee-wiz, graduation, father's day, mother's day,
send money, spend money, bye, bonvoyage, baby,
twins, congrats, nice try, I'm sorry, miss you,
please write, I did write, sympathy, wedding,
wild times, christmas, halloween, thanksgiving,
promotion, parenting, pals, friends, family, no reason,
any reason, even without a reason.
send a "recycled paper" card or give a gift (even to yourself)

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20
11 A.M. to 3 P.M.
Mich. LeagueBallroo
PRE-PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
~CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
HE NNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

north campus plaza
665-3721

OWuz~e 1xrxlIx~ts k~r more
chan just the oITh~e.

L----- --- .---------------------------------J

~1

What do these people have
in common with the U of M ?
Emiliano Zapata Muriel Lester John Sinclair
Minnie Wallace Eugene Debs Stephen Vail
Bertrand Russell Paulo Friere Chief Black Elk
Moses Coady Luther Buchele Gabriel Richard
Harold Osterweil A.K. Stevens Lenny Bruce
Coretta Scott King .
1%' Answer:
member houses of the
InterCooperative Council at thE
University of Michigan have beer

STRATEGIC PLANNING'
ASSOCIATES, INC.
OPPORTUNITIES IN
MANAGEME NT CONSULTING
Strategic Planning Associates, Inc. (SPA) is a
management consulting firm that develops corporate
and business strategies for a Fortune 500 client base.
SPA, based in Washington, D.C., London, Geneva,
and Singapore, offers a broad range of services which
include corporate strategy studies, individual business
studies, acquisition analyses, analyses of competitors
and industry structure, and operational and imple-
mental studies.
We are seeking talented undergraduates to join
the firm in our Washington office as Research Analysts
who will work closely with other professionals on client
case studies. The two-year position provides extensive
experience and excellent preparation for graduate work.
Mr. Ronald Cooper, Manager, along with other
members of SPA's professional staff will speak on
campus at Michigan:
MONDAY, OCTOBER 19
MICHIGAN UNION

I

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