100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 09, 1987 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-09
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a

w w U

I I

.

MICH-ELLANY

FILM

Give me a break, it's a pennant race

It's bombs away again for Moore

z
0
y
z
0
z
W
Y

ArthurMiller
INTER VIEW
Highly acclaimed playwright
discusses autobiography,
American culture, and his
experiences at the 'U"
Arthur Miller is probably the most widely read and highly acclaimed
living playwright. Miller, who graduated from the University in 1938,
is the author of Death of A Salesman, The Crucible, and A View From
the Bridge, among some three dozen works of fiction and drama. He
received a Pulitzer Prize in 1949 for Death of A Salesman and his first
literary successes were the two Hopwood Awards he won as a student at
the University.Timebends, Miller's autobiography, will be.published
next month. He recently held a news conference attended by WEEKEND
Editor Alan Paul.
Question: Why did you write your autobiography right now,
instead of five years ago or five years from now?
Miller: Over the last few years, I've had inquiries from three or
four writers who wanted to do this, and I kept slacking it off and then I
found that two of them were really intent about wanting to start some
preliminary work on a biography and since I have trouble enough trying
to figure out what happened myself, the idea of anyone else doing this
with any degree of accuracy, I simply didn't believe it.
There's also an increasing interest on my part in contemplating the
nature of the amazing changes that I've been through, and that this
world and this country have been through from my particular witness. I
was interested in tracing them out myself. In other words, I didn't have
the answers, I had the questions about how things got to be the way
they are.
I also found that an amazing number of people of my generation no
longer remembered what had happened. History in this country vanishes
very rapidly. And I thought it would be a good thing if I could manage
it, to try and reach down to the roots of things as I saw them. As it
turns out, it's not just a biography but a kind of history of the last half,
century or more and I'm happy about that..
Q: Have you found looking back over the past forty or fifty years
that there are certain cycles in American behavior?
M: Oh definitely. I think it's been going on for longer than I've
been around. Namely,a swing from more or less radical thought back to
See INTERVIEW, page 9

I woke up this morning with a
lot of important stuff to do. My
column was due in the early
afternoon, and I had no idea what I
was going to write about. The
Daily Libels were heading into the
playoffs, on the strength of a 2-0
regular season, and were counting
on my ace relief pitching at 3 p.m.
(You were counting on that ace
relief pitching, weren't you
gang?...Gang?) And, as always
there was studying to be,
done...don't want to embarrass
myself in tomorrow's classes.
It's 7:17, Sunday night, and so
far, I'm 0-for-3. No column. The
Libels lost 12-1. A lonely, ornery
stack of books is lurking on the
shelf behind my door, thinking of
ways to get back at me.
But I was in the centerfield
bleachers.
It was supposed to happen like
this: my pal Robert, for whom I
purchased bleacher seats Friday
night, was going to Tiger Stadium
early this morning. He would wait
in line until 11 a.m., when a whole
bunch of people would show up and
surreptitiously hand himwmoney.
He would buy tickets. We would go
sit down. It was a bitchin' plan.
OFF THE WALL
I'm a rowdy life lover in a sea of
sheep.
Angell Hall
Why does everyone answer
questions with questions. I don't
know. Why do you think? What do
you mean?
Angell Hall
Abuse these tables. We own them.
Angell Hall
A generalist is someone who learns
less and less about more and more
and ultimately knows nothing
about everything.
A specialist is someone who learns
more and more about less and less
and ultimately knows everything
about nothing.
Angell Hall
Down with Deanne Baker reformism
The Grad. library

JOHN
LOGIE
My friend and former housemate
Kim called me at some ungodly
time like 9:30, asking when we
should leave. I told her the game
wasn't until 3, but she wouldn't
believe me, because the schedule
she got at the beginning of the
season said the game was at 1:30.
So I panicked, and showered, and
staggered out to her waiting
automobile long before I was ready
to face the world.
Five minutes out of Ann Arbor,
I checked the paper. Game-time...3
p.m. "But Robert will be cold and
hungry," we reasoned, and we sped
all the way to Michigan and
Trumbull.
I scanned the ticket line several
times. Robert wasn't there. Don't
worry Robert. I'm not angry.
Not so long as I can say
this..."YOU MISSED IT! YOU
BLEW IT! I WAS THERE AND
YOU WEREN'T! A-HA-HA-HA-

HA!"
Three-and-a-half hours before the
National Anthems, Kim and I were
in the Upper Deck, socking away
Tiger Dogs, jalepeno nachos, Hot
Knots®TM, and Diet Cokes.
Eventually this combination
produced a precisision re-enactment
of Pearl Harbor near my duodenum.
Tiger bleacher creatures are an
amazing bunch, too. In centerfield
there are usually almost as many
greasy dishwater blond burnouts as
there were at the Judas Priest
concert. (Yes, I did see Judas. They
stunk.)
And speaking of "stunk" it's one
of the many tenses of the favorite
verb of the guy who was in the seat
next to me. And I heard them
all:"This game stinks. Boy that
stank. This is stinky! I hate just
being ahead by one run, it stinks a
lot!"
Now before I go any further, I'd
like to make something absolutely
clear. I respect and appreciate the
contributions of the soldiers who
participated in the VietNam war,
and I think the continued
proliferation of the "crazed 'Nam
vet" in the mass media is appalling.
See LOGIE, Page 9

By David Peltz
Poor Dudley Moore. It's very
easy to feel sorry for someone who
had to be subjected to having his
name on marquees across the country
for Best Defense, 1984's mega-flop
with Eddie Murphy. Now, Moore
must be subjected to more ridicule
and humilation, as he stars in the
equally pathetic new release, Like
Father Like Son.
Like Father Like Son is Moore's
first film after a two-year self--
imposed hiatus from the business.
An accomplished pianist, Moore
appeared in various concerts across
the country, longing to see if
anything in his life "resurrected
itself." Moore should have stuck
with music; the only thing that
resurrected itself in Like Father, Like
Son was another sub par role for the
once-proud English star.
Moore stars as Dr. Jack
Hammond, a brilliant surgeon and
father to sixteen year old Chris,
played by America's latest in a long
line of heartthrobs, Kirk Canmeron.
When Dr. Hammond accidentally
drinks from a brain transference
potion, he changes bodies with his
son, forcing both to undertake the
other's daily lives. Moore must go

to school in Cameron's body;
Cameron to the hospital in Moore's.
(Haven't we seen this before on The
Wonderful World of Disney?)
It is here that Like Father Like
Son runs into real problems.
Moore's portrayal of the sixteen year
old Chris as a clumsy, mischievous
clod is incredibly overblown. Moore
bumbles, stumbles, and ultimately
embarrasses himself; he embarrasses
the audience as well.
Cameron also goes off the deep
end with his depiction of his pops as
a hard nosed, no nonsense father. But
these faults almost surely lie more
in the hands of Lorne Cameron (no
relation to Kirk) and Steven L.
Bloom's ridiculous screenplay.
Moore once again displays his talent
for slapstick, while Cameron (Bobby
Brady with mousse) is truly likable
and surprisingly effective in his
screen debut. But both are saddled
with an unworkable script and
neither can come close to saving
Like Father Like son.
Director Rod Daniels must also
accept some of the blame for this
travesty. Daniels seems to have
partaken in a brain transference of
his own, with fellow director Martin
Scorcese. Daniels uses enough of
Scorcese's trademark camera

movements to make any viewer
reach for a large bottle of aspirin.
This type of filmmaking simply
doesn't work in light comedy, and
Daniels, who directed 1985's Teen
Wolf, once again shows that he has
no comic touch.
Cameron and Moore should be
able to find some bright spots
amidst all this gloom. Judging from
the hysterical screams of the
pubescent girls in the audience each
time Cameron's mug appeared on
screen, he is one actor whose future
should only improve. And Moore?
Well, at least he can take comfort in
the fact that Like Father Like Son
isn't anywhere near the bomb that
Best Defense was.
Or is it?
Actually, it's probably too close
to call.
WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

See
THE LI
for
first-run rrc
times, and

oP
c ° >A°
. 'a P

CARDS
MUGS
T-SHIRT
SWEETEST DAY -
INFLATABLES
JELLY BELLY & GOE
DOODLES 76
LOCATED ON THE LOWER L
PLAZA ON THE CORNER OF

SKTC L?Ab

E ZINN

DIANIThTROL 37: 1T4$ ULTIMATE sotb tDri
AW.-,ME. 6 ANoIzlaCo~b SYM~PTOMS bo TABi
GET IT ove. wW4"FAT"'i/
bN RF ! 3
06-

Hill Street Forum Presents: Great Writers Series

John Irving
Wednesday, November 4
8pm Hill Auditorium

Jay Mclnerny
Wednesday, January 27
Rackham Auditorium

John Irving is author of The World According to
Garp, The Hotel New Hampshire, and The
Cider House Rules. He is one of America's
finest writers and a speaker of enormous wit
and charm.

Mclnerny's first novel, Bright Lights, Big City
has become a huge success and is especially
popular on college campuses. This is an
opportunity to meet a new talent on the literary
scene.

Be a Sponsor!
Your tax-deductible contribution of $25 makes you a Sponsor of this'
wonderful series.
As a Sponsor, you will get:
-your name listed in the program of every performance
-advance notice and ticket information about other exciting programs
in addition to those in the series
-an invitation for two to a special afterglow with either John Irving or
Jay Mclnerny. ( Both will be studentcommunity receptions in.
conjunction with Pilot Program at the U-M )
-the satisfaction of having played an important role in our community
through support of the series.
Be a Patron!
Your tax-deductible contribution of $50 makes you a Patron of this
wonderful series.
As a patron you will enjoy all the advantages of being a sponseo plus
-an invitation for two to receptions for both John Irving and
Jay Mclnerny

Order Form
Return to Hill Street Forum-Hillel 339 East Liberty, Ann
Arbor, Mi. 48104.
Make checks payable to Hill Street Forum.

Name
Address
Phone Date
check Visa
No. Exp. Date
Signature
Name to appear in program
Great Writers
Please send me:
series tickets x $15-
1 would also like to be a2
Patron
Great Writers Total

Ever Consider St
GERMANY - Tubingen I
FRANCE - Lurcy Fellow
LONDON - London Coll(
ISRAEL - Hebrew Unive
NORTHERN IRELAND -
Applications for Study Abr
graduate students 1988-89
DEADLINE: NOVEM
For applications and ix
The Horace H. Ra
School of Graduate
Fellowship Of
160 Rackham Bu
764-2218

Master card

No more expert's rule!

The UGLI

Try the rapist not the victim
Student Publication Building

John Irving 0 Jay Mclnerny 0

Dick...is

The UGLI

fllild

q

. - r r -mmj

I ,U4

I

PAGE 8 WEEKEND/OCTOBER 9, 1987

WEEKEND/OCTOBER 9, 1987

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan