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September 10, 1987 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-10

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40

Page 2 -The Michigan Daily, Thursday, September 10, 1987

The

University: it's

as good as they say

t
E
A
Y
Y

By CATHERINE KIM
During their four years here,
University students can expect to
hear frequently from a variety of
sources just how good the ol' Uni-
versity really is. But is it that good?
It is, according to college refer-
ence books.
The University is ranked "highly
competitive," for example, by Bar-
ron's Guide to American College.
That guide considers the high school
rank and SAT or ACT scores of ac-
cepted students as well as the ratio
between the number of students ac-
cepted to the number of applicants,
said Max Reed, an editor at Barron's
Publishing Company.
THE guide ranks schools as
either "less competitive," "very

competitive," "highly competitive,"
and "most competitive," he said.
"Really, (the University) is just
short of 'most competitive."'
The University accepted 9,000'
out of 16,000 applicants in the rat-
ing year. However, last year's in-
crease in applications -to 19,000
- may raise the University's rank-
ing to "most competitive," he said.t
Lovejoy's College Guide judges
universities on a number of factors,
including the number of books in
their libraries, the number of
Ph.D.'s on the faculty, the existence
of a Phi Beta Kappa chapter.
The publication said the
University excels in several areas,
including the psychology, sociolo-

gy, anthropology, and political sci-
ence, as well as in the Honors, Pi-
lot, and Residential College pro-,
grams.

Straughn, head editor at Lovejoy's.
"The school decides how hard it is to
get into. We don't have the figures
for the University of Michigan yet,

'If Ann Arbor has become a bit trendy with horse-
drawn carriages and sidewalk cafes, it is nevertheless a
spot for serious study and tradition.'
- Edward Fiske, New York Times education editor
"WE just started to have the but the issue is coming out in the
universities rank themselves based fall."
on the SAT scores of their students, "We try to be very objective, so
and similar indicators," said Barbara we don't call up the students and

faculty and ask their opinions," she
said.
Edward Fiske, education editor of
the New York Times, mentioned the
University's academic excellence and
cultural atmosphere. "If Ann Arbor
'has become a bit trendy with horse-
drawn carriages and sidewalk cafes, it
is nevertheless a spot for serious
study and tradition."
FISKE added that one-half of the
University's graduates go on to at-
tend graduate school and that 95 per-
cent of University's students come
from the top one-fifth of their high
school class; 98 percent were in the
top two-fifths of their class.
Keith Molin, director of the Uni-
versity's Office of Communications,
said, "When we publicize the Uni-

versity, we don't choose a specific:
field, but focus on activities which
are currently being held at the:
school. We may do a focus on the,
people or on the activity itself, but:
don't generally emphasize 'good:
points' and 'bad points."'
Reference books which offer an
"insider's view" commonly mention
the popularity of marijuana and
football, the difficulty of parking,
the cultural atmosphere of Ann Ar-
bor, and the large school size.
Lisa Birnbach's College Book:
lists prominent alumni, including
Clarence Darrow, Madonna Ciccone,
James Earl Jones, Tom Hayden,
Gilda Radner, Gerald Ford, and Ann:
Davis, who played "Alice" on the:
Brady Bunch.

al

ARTHUR
ANDERSEN
We are pleased to announce the following 1987 graduates of the University of
Michigan School of Business have recently become associated with our Firm.

Computers: not for papc

DETROIT OFFICE
Andrew Boschma, MAcc
Tax
Debra Bourland, BBA/ACCT
Audit
Katherine Buczkowski, BBA/ACCT
Tax
Jeffrey Campbell, BBA/FIN
Audit
Jean Carroll, MBA
Consulting
Marcelo Casas, MBA
Consulting,
Robert Elliott, MBA
Consulting
Terry Greenleaf, BA/ACCT
Audit
John Lectka, BBA/FIN
Consulting
Diana Li, BBA/ACCT
Audit
John McBride, BBA/FIN
Consulting
Thomas McMillan, BS/ACCT
Audit
Thomas Pahl, BBA/ACCT
Audit
Roshunda Price, BBA/ACCT
Audit
Susan Prill, MBA
Consulting
Linda Runson, MAcc
Tax
Lesley Winograd, BBA/MKTG
Consulting

ATLANTA OFFICE
Karen Curry, BBA/ACCT
Audit
BOSTON OFFICE
Linso Van Der Burg, MBA
Audit
CHICAGO OFFICE
Christopher Block, MBA
Consulting
Richard Costolo, BBA/CS
Consulting
Kimberly Dolan, BBA/ACCT
Audit
Lori Freedland, BBA/ACCT
Audit
John Guldan, MBA
Consulting
Jay Heller, BBA/ACCT
Audit
Thomas May, BBA/ACCT
Audit
Nancy McAdam, MBA
Consulting
Julian Murphy, BBA/ACCT
Tax
Christine Scheidt, BBA/ACCT
Audit
John Solberg, BBA/FIN
Consulting
Sheryl Trivers, BBA/ACCT
Audit
HONG KONG OFFICE
Terence Choi, MBA
Audit

INDIANAPOLIS OFFICE
Karin Myers, MBA
Tax
LOS ANGELES OFFICE
Lisa Herrick, BBA/FIN
Consulting
MINNEAPOLIS OFFICE
David Jaqua, BBA/FIN
Consulting
NEW YORK OFFICE
Edward Solomon, BBA/ACCT
Audit
SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE
Jerome Drobny, MBA
Consulting
Eric Hoover, MBA
Consulting
Darin Stoddard, BBA/MKTG
Consulting
SAN JOSE OFFICE
Christopher Potter, BBA/ACCT
Audit
TORONTO OFFICE
Stephen Wilson, BBA/FIN
Consulting

By PAUL HENRY CHO
Although University computers
seem to offer nothing but word
processing programs to weary
students the night before a paper's
due, they also offer electronic mail
and intercollegiate communication
services.
The Michigan Terminal System
(MTS) - a campus-wide computer
network - gives students and
faculty an alternative academic
computer system.
An IBM 3090-400, located at the
University Computing Center on
North Campus, provides the database
for MTS and is described as a "small
supercomputer."
RICHARD Conto, a University
computer consultant, said that

students use MTS primarily to
exchange and share information.
MTS is not, however, connected
with the University computers used
to store grades, CRISP information,
student accounts, and other
administrative information.
"A student cannot use the MTS
system to gain access to this type of
information, because the database is
stored on a completely different
computer, separate from, the IBM
(3090-400)," Conto said.
He also added that MTS is strictly
an academic computer system.
THE system is divided into two
different "units" which students and
faculty can use. The UB unit is
generally used by students and offers
request accounts at no charge. The

UM unit offers accounts which users
pay for according to time logged on
the computer.
The computer language,
PASCAL, is the most commonly
used language on MTS, but BASIC,
C, and FORTRAN are also used.
The system is part of the Merit
Network, a state-wide computer
network that links the University
with Michigan State, Wayne State,
Oakland, and Western Michigan
Universities as well as other major
academic computer systems.
This fall, the University
Computing Center, along with the
Campus Information Center (CIC),
will be offering a public events
message service through MTS
available to all students and faculty.
ACCORDING to Leslie Perrin,
events manager at the CIC, the
message system - called the.
Public Server - will allow students
to acquire information concerning
various events on campus as well as
selected events at the University's
Flint and Dearborn campuses.
Non-profit, cultural events such
as those offered at the Ark are also
included in the Public Server
listings.
For those who have computers at
home or in their dormitory, the

/ rs only'
Public Server, as well as MTS, can'
be accessed via a phone modem;
system. Access numbers may be
obtained at the computing center on
North Campus.
Frank Pinkelman, a Computet
Science and Psychology major who
graduated from the University in
1985, designed the Public Serve
program.
He plans to install a messago
service within the program that will
enable students without computer
accounts to leave messages' for the
CIC directly on the Public Servet
system. Student may use thg
system to obtain information at no
cost

0

Conto urged students interested in
MTS to take the introductory to
MTS courses offered at thd
Microcomputer Education
Center(MEC) at the School of
Education.
The MEC also offers information
on the various computer networks
available at the University, such as
the one used by the University
library system.
"MTS is useful to students for
programming, exchanging electronic
mail cross-country, holding
computer conferences, and as a
commonplace for sharing
information," Conto said..

We are pleased to announce the following 1987 graduates of the University of
Michigan School of Engineering have recently become associated with our Firm.

DETROIT OFFICE
Fay Barinka, BS/ENG
Consulting
Thomas Butcher, BS/CS
Consulting
Joan Cartter, BS/ENG
Consulting
Diana Daugherty, BS/ENG
Consulting
Timothy DenBesten, BS/ENG
Consulting
Timothy Gerios, BS/ENG
Consulting
Stephanie Hanks, BS/ENG
Consulting
Jeffrey Head, BS/ENG
Consulting
Glenn Kraskey, BS/ENG
Consulting
Stuart Lewis, BS/ENG
Consulting
Steven Lyons, MS/ENG
Audit

Scot McConkey, MS/CIS
Consulting
Marc Parrish, BS/ENG
Consulting
Melinda Rock, BS/ENG
Consulting
Carolyn Rowles, BS/ENG
Consulting
Ann Scott, BS/ENG
Consulting
David Shuart, BS/ENG
Consulting
James Smith, BS/ENG
Consulting
Michael Warner, BS/ENG
Cons'ulting
BOSTON OFFICE
Thomas Vandini, MS/ENG
Consulting
CHICAGO OFFICE
Stephanie Bickelmann, BS/ENG
Consulting
Jeffrey Keller, BS/ENG
Consulting

Stephen Robb, BS/ENG
Consulting
CHICAGO OFFICE -
Technical Services
Christopher Sagastume, BS/CS
Consulting
Todd Wilson, BS/ENG
Consulting
LOS ANGELES OFFICE
Peter Goettner. BS/ENG
Consulting
MEMPHIS OFFICE
Robert Tracy, BS/ENG
Consulting
PITTSBURG OFFICE
Steven Wachs,FBS/ENG
Consulting
SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE
Kenneth Smith, BS/ENG
Consulting

Vol. XCVIII - No.1
The Michigan Daily (IS SN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One
term-$10 in town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan-Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub -
scribes to Pacific News Service and the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

New Student Edition Editor.... STEPHEN GREGORY
Summer Editor in Chief............REBECCA
BLUMENSTEIN
Managing Editor...................MARTIN FRANK
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Lisa Babcock, Vicki
Bauer, Ted Blum, Brian Bonet, Chris Borris, Christina
Brown, Paul Henry Cho, Dan Cooke, Rebecca Cox,
Sheala Durant, John Ein, Grace Hill, Hal Kane, Angie
Jakary, Catherine Kim, Edward Kleine, Taylor Lincoln,
Andrew McCuaig, Lisa Pollak, Melissa Ramsdell; Martha
Sevetson, Cathy Shap, Ryan Tutak, Jim Vana
Opinion Page Editors.......................TIM HUET
LISA JORDAN
OPINION PAGE STAFF:
Henry Park, Arlin Wasserman, Mark Williams
Entertainment Editor................ ALAN PAUL
ENTERTAINMENT STAFF:
Stephanie Brown, Seth Flicker, Brian Jarvinen, Cathy
Joliffe, Mike Rubin, Marc Taras

Sports Editors....................... DARRENJASEY
UREGMOLZON
JEFF RUSH
SPORTS STAFF:
Scott G. Miller, Adam Schefier, Pete Steinert
Photo Editors SCOTT LITUCHY
JOHN MUNSON
Business Manager............ REBECCA LAWRENCE
Sales Manager............................ ANNE KUBEK
Assistant Finance Manager.............. ANNE KARLE
SALES STAFF:
Tom Kerr, Eva Mendelson, Sherry Picklo, Jill Shiner,
Tracey Sugg
PHONE NUMBERS: Newsroom (313) 764-0552,
Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 763-0376,.
Circulation 764-0558, Classified Advertising 764-0557,
Display Advertising 764-05.4, Billing 764-0550

We are pleased to announce the following 1987 graduates of the University of
Michigan School of Public Health have recently become associated with our Firm.

DETROIT OFFICE
Thomas Brisse, MHSA
Consuiting

DETROIT OFFICE
Nancy Heinlein, MHSA
Consulting

CHICAGO OFFICE
Jennifer Krock, MHSA
Consulting

Congratulations to our summer interns who will be returning to the University of
Michigan this fall.

Glenn Barba
Audit
Scott Cousino
Audit
Ursula Cunningham
Audit

Michelle Harlton
Tax
Michael Moore
Audit
Daniel Palomaki
Audit

Christopher Tressler
Tax
Christopher Wylie
Audit
Sherry Brand
Audit/Grand Rapids

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PHONE NUMBERS: Newsroom (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814,
Arts 763-0379, Sports 763-0376, Circulation 764-0558, Classified
Advertising 764-0557, Display Advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-
0550.
Section cover photos by: Sports- John Munson,
City Dana Mendelssohn, Activism - Darrian
Smith
W E ARE H E R E FOR YOU!
Monday - Friday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Visit our office for:

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