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October 01, 1987 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-10-01

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 1, 1987

Apple challenges 'U'

By RYAN TUTAK
Apple Computers has chosen the
University as one of only a handful of
campuses to participate in a pair of contests to
design the personal computers of the future.
One contest, open to twelve universities,
challenges students in teams of no more than
five to envision the technology of computers
by the year 2000. Each member of the winning
team will be awarded $2,000 of Apple products
and a summer internship at the company. The
school of the winning team will receive five
Macintosh computers, a LaserWriter printer and
an AppleTalk network.
Laura Reynolds, Apple's coordinator of the
contest, said the University was selected to
participate in the contest because it "is on the
leading edge of Macintosh technology. We were
looking for minds that are leading us into the
21st century. And the (University) fits that

mold."
The contest is as unusual in its guidelines
as it is creative in its concept. Students have
less than a month to design a computer; Oct.
30 is the deadline for entries. It is open to all
students, but only the top two entries will
represent the University. i
Ed Saunders, a director of User Services at
the Computer Center and supervisor of the
contest, said the short time span of the contest
may limit the technical development of ideas.
"I'm not sure how realistic it is that
students will come up with something that
(Apple) has not designed in the lab already,"
Saunders said.
Reynolds said Apple does not expect
students to build a new computer. "The contest
is very intangible," she said. "We want this to
be an intellectual exercise that is fun. We want
to students to think about the possibilities that
will exist in computing in the 21st century."
LSA Senior Haran Rashes has started to

students
design a computer which is smaller than the
current Macintosh, has artificial intelligence and
responds to verbal commands.
"I'm always interested in improving the
Macintosh," said Rashes, coordinator of the
Residential College Computer Program.
Students at 28 universities will participate
in the other contest to design a system of
software consistent with Apple's research goals
in education. A winner will be selected from
each school, and will receive a $2,500 stipend.
Each school will receive a Macintosh computer
and accompanying software.
Reynolds said this contest is "geared toward
motivating engineers to design specific software
systems."
The University's Information Technology
Division will hold meetings at Chrysler Center
Auditorium tonight and Oct. 13 at 7:00 p.m. to
answer questions and help students with their
projects.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
Mine scare reroutes ships
MANAMA, Bahrain - A new mine scare yesterday sent commercial
shipping on a circuitous route through the northern Persian Gulf as two
U.S.-escorted convoys steamed north and south through the waterway.
The latest reported danger zones were near Farsi Island, a stronghold
of Iran's Revolutionary Guards. Gulf-based shipping executives said
several possible sightings had been reported by ships sailing to and
from Kuwait.
British Royal Navy mine sweepers spent a second day searching
waters off the southern coast where possible sightings of mines were
reported, but they apparently found nothing.
Ford - UAW contract ratified
DETROIT - Ford Motor Co. workers' ratification of a new job-
protecting contract has cleared the way for intense negotiations with
General Motors Corp. today, a union spokesperson said yesterday.
Ford's 104,000 active United Auto Workers union members
approved the pact by a 72 percent margin in a weeklong vote, the union
said. It declined to release a final vote count.
"This strong margin of endorsement confirms that the-membership at
Ford recognizes that we achieved our No. 1 goal which is greatly
enhanced job security," UAW President Owen Bieber and Vice President
Stephen Yokich said in a statement.

A family tradition forover37 years

Statement defends
freedom of speech

Aquino forces s

urround

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(Continued from Page 1)
speeches.
The board released the n e w
statement to University President
Harold Shapiro, the Michigan
It's a way to codify what
principles ought to be
followed.'
-Jack Weigle, former
chair of Civil Liberties
Board
Student Assembly, and the Senate
Advisory Committee on University
Affairs (SACUA), asking for
feedback and approval.
"I think it's a carefully crafted

ALL SIZES &
MODELS
CUSTOMIZED
LEASES

document that attempts to express
the balance between the rights of
protesters and regularly scheduled
events," said SACUA chair Harris
McClamroch, a professor of
aerospace engineering.
McClamroch said he thought the
statement could be more explicit in
some areas, but he would not
elaborate. MSA President Ken Weine
and Shapiro were unavailable for
comment.
Weigel said that if the students,
faculty, and administration ratify the
statement, it will replace the 1977
statement as the University's official
stand. Although the statement
delegates enforcement power to the
University president, Weigel said it
is not an enforceable measure.
"There is no real enforcement
power," Weigel said. "It's a way to
codify what principles ought to be
followed."
UM News in
The Daily
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662-3175

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Manila to ward oll coup
MANILA, Philippines - Soldiers backed by tanks encircled Manila
yesterday to block any further attempt to topple President Corazon
Aquino, but they withdrew after the military said no mutineers tried to
enter the city.
Col. Emiliano Templo, chief of staff at the Capital Regional
Command, said hundreds of battle-ready soldiers and marines rushed to
the edge of the city late Tuesday after receiving reports "that rebel
soldiers were coming to Manila."
But Templo said Brig. Gen. Ramon Montano, commander of a new
"anti-coup" force, ordered the troops back to the barracks about 18 hours
later after no mutineers showed up.
The latest coup scare set in motion a chain of rumors about
"unauthorized troop movements" that highlighted command and control
problems within the divided, poorly trained armed forces.
Arms to China plot revealed
NEWARK - Authorities have uncovered a plot to export missiles
and F-14 fighter aircraft planes to the People's Republic of China
involving high-ranking Chinese officials, it was revealed in court yes-
terday.
The disclosure came during a detention hearing for businessman
Chang-Yao Chi who was arrested Sunday. He was charged with con-
spiracy to illegally export arms.
Chi has links to "high-ranking members of the United Nations
(Chinese) delegation and the People's Republic of China," said U.S.
Attorney Mark Olinsky.
The F-14 is the U.S. Navy's primary fighter jet and the U.S. has ne-
ver sold one to China. The missiles involved were the TOW and side-
winders.
EXTRAS
'Miami Vice' is nice, says squad,
but it ain't the real thing
MIAMI (AP) - Hold on. TV shows don't reflect real life?
The real Miami vice squad doesn't think so. It isn't particularly
impressed with "Miami Vice," the glamour-packed and gunshot-riddled
detective show that is beginning its fourth season on NBC-TV.
"The show to us is really farfetched, and we don't really pay a lot of
attention to it," said Miami vice detective Eladio "Crockett" Paez, whose
squad is officially known as the Miami Narcotics Detail of the Special
Investigations Section.
"It did a lot of good to the image of Miami with the scenery and
fashions. Other than that, it hasn't done much," he said, adding that he
wouldn't tune in for the show's season opener Friday.
So the moral of the story is, TV shows like "Miami Vice" are great
with fashion and scenery, but not with serious issues. You didn't really
have to read this article to figure that out, did you?
"Miami Vice" publicist Deborah Kelman said from Los Angeles, "I
have no interest on commenting on this."
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.
Vol. XCVIII- No.16
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April--$25 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term: $13
in Ann Arbor, $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub -
scribes to the Los Angeles Times Syndicate and the National Student
News Service.

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Well, not really obnoxious, just very enthusiastic about the
U of M! The College of Literature, Science and the Arts is
interviewing students to work for an alumni fundraising
telethon. The LS&A Phonathon runs five nights a week
from October 11 to November 19. You will be able to
select the two nights out of the five you wish to work with
some opportunity to work additional nights.
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT
Hours: 6:30 - 9:30
Pay: $4.00 / hr. plus bonus
LSA Students Preferred
763-5576
The University of Michigan is on Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer

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Guest Speakers
Career Decisions
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TEST DRIVE A YUGO BEFORE YOU DECIDE

Editor in Chief.................................ROB EARLE
Managing Editor........ ....AMY MINDELL
News Editor ......................PHLIP I. LEVY
City Editor ...............MELISSA BIRKS
Features Editor .............MARTIN FRANK
University Editor .......... ....KERY MURAKAMI
NEWS STAFF: Elizabethi Atkins, Francie Arenson,
Vicki Bauer, Eve Becker, Steve Blonder, Jim Bray,
Doy Cohen, Hampton Dell inger, Kenneth Dintzer,
Nancy Driscoll ,Sheala Durant, Stephen Gregory,
Edward Kleine, Steve Knopper, Carrie Loranger,
Michael Lustig, Alyssa Lustignan. Andrew Mills, Peter
Omrer, Eugene Pak, Lisa Pollak, Melissa Ramsdell,
MarthaSevetson, Steve Tuch, David Webster, Rose
Mary Wunmmel.
Opinion Page Editors...................PETER MOONEY
HENRY PARK
Assoc. Opinion Page Editor....CALE SOUTHWORTH
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Muzammil Ahmed,
Rosemary Chinnock. Tim Huet, Josh Levin., Jeff
Rutherford, Steve Semenuk, Mark Williams.
Arts Editors................................BRIAN BONET
BETH FERTIG
Books.................................LISA MAGNINO
Film................ JOHN SHEA
Theatre .................................AMY KOCH
ART T AFF:T on. Casso'. B~~"l~r.. .u... n 1 ..h

Adam Schrager, Scott Shaffer, Pete Steinert, Douglas
Volan, Peter Zellen, Bill Zoila.
Photo Editors......................SCOTT LITUCHY
AND! SCHEIBER
PHOTO STAFF: Karen Handelmean, Ellen Levy, Robin
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Weekend Editors .......REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
ALAN PAUL
Business Manager.. REBECCA LAWRENCE
Sales Manager............... KUBEK
Assistant Sales Manager...........KAREN BROWN
SALES STAFF: Gail Belenson, Sherri Blansky. Julie
Bowers, Valerie Breier. Pam Bullock, Stephanie Bm
Milton Fold, Kim Feuerstein, Lisa Geoge, Mid &l
Gill, Jeff Grant, Missy Hambrick. Ginger Heyman,
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Parmss Jackie Rosenberg, Jennifer Rowe, Jim Ryan.
Laura Sciilanger, Jennifer Siegel, Michelle Slavik, Mary
Snyder.
NATIONALS:Michelle Ketcham
Finance Manager..........................RYAN TUTAK
Assistant Finance Manager............ANNE KARLE

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