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September 30, 1987 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-30

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ARTS
Wednesday, September 30, 1987

The Michigan Daily

Page
autobiography

Miller to read

from his

By Lisa Magnino
In 1934 a young New Yorker
named Arthur Miller entered the
University of Michigan where he
majored in journalism and worked as
a nightside editor at the Michigan
Daily. However, Miller longed to
create his own works rather than
write of the news of others.
In his second year at t h e
University, Miller wrote a play
entitled No Villain . It took h im
about a week to write, and he won a
Hopwood for it. Encouraged by his
success, Miller took a class in which
he first encountered Henrik Ibsen's
domestic dramas, which were to be a
major influence on his socially
conscious work. He rewrote No
Villain for its production in Ann
Arbor and Detroit, and his second
play, Honors at Dawn, won him his
second Hopwood in June of 1936.
So began a praised and prolific
career for this Michigan alumnus
who went on to win the Pulitizer
Prize in 1949 forDeath of a
Salesman and the Antoinette Perry
award in 1953 for The Crucible.
Miller also acted as an adjunct
associate professor of drama at the
University from 1973-74.
Miller is known for his political
activism. While at the University,
he protested the Spanish Civil War
and supported liberal reform
programs during the Depression.
During the McCarthy era, he was

However, Miller is not expected
to discuss his plays or other
writings in depth. Those who saw
Joseph Heller at the Power Center
last year can expect the same sort of

reading - a more personal focus-on
the background of the plays and on
the writer's life.
In an introduction to a collect
See ARTHUR Page 10

JOSTENS
GOLD RING!SALE
IS COMING! _

$20 O FF

18K
14K
10K

While an undergrad at the University, Arthur Miller won two Hopwoods for his playwriting.

.A 1

accused of being a Communist
because of his past associations with
leftist groups. More recently, Miller
has continued his political
involvement through commentary
on his travels to China and the
Soviet Union.

Tonight, Arthur Miller returns to
Ann Arbor to read from his up-
comingautobiography, Timebends:
A Life. Miller's reading is the
inaugural event for the Institute for
the Humanities as part of its year-
long series on theater and society.

The Institute's purpose is "to
support study and research for the
humanities, to encourage inter-
disciplinary studies, and to make
connections outside the academic
world for the researchers," according
to Sue Coffman of the Institute.

Tetes Noires will turn heads

Jos,
A M E R I C A S
book & supply
341 East Liberety
(at Division Street)
Ann Arbor, MI
(313)665-4990

C 0 L L E G E

Ri N G

Monday, September 28
thru Friday, October 2,
11 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Stop by and see a
Jostens representative
to select from a com-
plete line of gold rings.
A $20.00 deposit is required.

By Timothy Huet
Thtes Noires will have come a
long way before reaching Ann Arbor
tonight. What began as a temporary
avant-garde project has become a
three-album band poised on the verge
of popular acceptance.
The band was originally created
by several -female Minneapolis
musicians who desired the kind of
musical exploration that their more
conventional ventures did not allow
for. In addition to the need for
stylistic exploration, these women
shared a common hair color, thus the
name, Tetes Noires, meaning "black
heads" in French.
Much to their surprise, these
women found that music tailored to
satisfy their own tastes was greeted
with enthusiasm by audiences. An
album and critical acclaim followed.
The question that remains for Tetes
Noires is whether or not their music

can attract a popular following. In an
effort to answer this question and
make their music more "accessible,"
Totes Noires has added a drummer for
their latest album, Clay Foot Gods.
With rave reviews and aggressive
promotion, the album is reaching
the hoped-for market.
Jennifer Holt, the band's violinist
and main driving force, explains the
band's new direction: "the feeling
was our music wasn't weird enough
to really get art grants and yet
without a drummer it wasn't
accessible enough to alot of people."
Holt admits her ambivalence about
the band's testing of mainstream
waters. Holt and other band members
have already begun independent
projects to pursue esoteric impulses.
That ambivalence comes through
in the latest album. There is a
perceptible tension between the
conventional percussion/bass
foundation and the more elaborate
musical edifice built upon it. The

contrast is especially sharp between
the conservative drum back-beat and
Holt-'s self-described "quirky" violin
musings.
Yet, the most salient element of
Tetes Noires' sound is their
intricately-layered harmonic vocals.

The band has one of those rarely
evocative deliveries that could make
the text of an economics book sound
beautiful.
But the lyrics to Thtes Noires'
See POISED Page 10

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDERGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM SERIES
ANNOUNCES:

A CALL FOR PAPERS

a F

STHE
I Ride
Ann Arbor Transportation Authorty
It's Required Riding!
Give yourself a new view of the world. Let
AATA take you wherever you're going
throughout the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.
Whether its shopping, a movie or restaurant,
or a part-time job, AATA service is convenient
and dependable.
For route and schedule information,
call 996-0400.
LARRY WANTS TO PROLONG
THE LIFE OF YOUR BIKE!
Jackson Ave.
across from Cottage Inn
A next to Capitol Cleaners
Liberty St.
Larry's Bike & Mower Shop
2306 W. Stadium Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48103
4 : 994-6555 HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 10-6

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNDERGRADUATE
COLLOQUIUM SERIES IS A PROGRAM SPONSORED BY THE
UNDERGRADUATE INITIATIVES FUND AND THE MICHIGAN
STUDENT ASSEMBLY. CREATED AND IMPLEMENTED BY
STUDENTS, IT IS ENVISIONED AS PROVIDING A MEDIUM
T HRO UGH WHICH ST UDENTS FROM DIVERSE AREAS OF THE
UNIVERSITY CAN PRESENT PAPERS ON TIMELY EDUCATIONAL
AND SOCIETAL ISSUES.TO THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY FOR
PEER INPUT AND DISCUSSION.
ALL PAPERS SUBMITTED BYAND RESTRICTED TO UNDER-
GRADUATES WILL BE REVIEWED BY STUDENTS AND FACULTY,
WHEREUPON THREE TO FOUR PAPERS WILL BE SELECTED FOR
ORAL PRESENTATION AND P UBLICATION IN A BOUND
COLLOQUIUM SERIES EDITION AND ADVICE. A PANEL OF SIX
STUDENTS IN ADDITION TO A "DISTINGUISHED GUEST" WILL
COMMENT ON AND PROPOSE RELEVANT QUESTIONS ON VARIOUS
POINTS AND ISSUES ADDRESSED BY THE STUDENT READ PAPERS.
PARTICIPATION BY THE AUDIENCE WILL BE IN THE FORM OF
QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS DIRECTED TO READERS, PANEL
MEMBERS AND THE DISTINGUISHED GUEST.
TOPIC: 'INDIVIDUALISM, SOCIETY AND A
LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION'

a.

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DISTINGUISHED GUEST:

RALPH KETCHAM
PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR
(PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE,
HISTORY, AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS,
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, NY)
DECEMBER 5,1987, SCHORLING AUD.,
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
1100-1700 WORDS

DATE AND PLACE:
PAPER LENGTH:
T1W9 A * U\ T TT F LMhF

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