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September 10, 1987 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-10

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily, Thursday, September 10, 1987

Students turn to

'U'

computers

By HAL KANE
The late nights spent in front of
typewriters most students face when
cranking out papers are rapidly
being replaced by late nights in
front of computers. A trend due
largely to the University's expan-
sion of its microcomputing net-
work.
The 21 University computing
centers - located throughout cam-
pus in dormitories, libraries, and
classroom buildings - are always
filled with students and faculty
working on papers, resumes,
announcements, graphs, and a broad
range of other activities. Most say
they are pleased with the University
facilities which combined provide
an estimated 1,000 terminals. The
largest center, located at 611
Church Street, has 161 computers.
Hours at each of the centers
vary. Some like 611 Church St. are
only open until 12:00 am, while
others like the centers in the North
University Building and Union are
open for 24 hours a day.
Last January the University

began offering computers to Uni-
versity community members at
approximately half of list price, and
during a two-day promotion last
spring, the University sold over
1,700 Macintosh Plus computers.
Although there are many
computers to work with, computer
use on campus is by no means is

and perhaps the most frightening
problem with computer use is
malfunction.
Computer malfunction resulting
in loss of data is a possibility for
any computer, and University
computers are no exception. Caused
by anything from dust in the
auxiliary disk drive to wristwatch

If you're careful, and you really know what you're
doing, maybe only once in a blue moon will you lose
data.
- Brian Wolfe,
a consultant at the Computing Assistance Center

but if not, they can always be
reached by picking up the red
phones in any of the centers and
dialing 4-HELP.
But According to Brian Wolfe,
a consultant at the Computing
Assistance Center, said "If you're
careful and you really know what
you're doing, maybe only once in a
blue moon will you lose data."
Consultants also teach courses
covering computer use at the
Microcomputer Education Center
located in the School of Education
building.
But computer use on campus has
not gained total popularity. Many
students prefer using typewriters
because they find typewriters to be
more reliable and simpler. Staunch
typewriter advocates defend their
preference, saying there is no way
for a typewriter to zap completed
work out of existence.
But Music School senior Alicia
Hunter disagrees. When asked if she
ever type even a small item, Hunter
said, "Type it? No, no - that
takes a lot more time."

problem-free. At times, especially
toward the end of a semester,
students can expect to wait any-
where from a half an hour to an
hour for a terminal due to increased
demand.
Users may also face other
bothers like University computer/
personal computer incompatibility,
confusing software, and long waits
for laser printers, but the biggest

demagnetization, malfunctions can
result in the loss of time, effort,
and a term paper.
But data loss is not always
permanent. The University employs
several computer consultants who
are usually able to retrieve lost data
from memory banks if the damage
isn't too severe.
A few consultants have their
offices in the computing centers,

Daily rnoto Dy yAN HABI
An Apple Macintosh Plus computer in the Undergraduate Library's
computing center welcomes users to come and explore the many ways
this and the nearly 1,000 other computers on campus can help them

LET OFF SOME STEAM

'U' Recreation build

By HAL KANE
If campus begin looks like all
work and no play this year, then
take a trip to either the Central
Campus Recreation Building
(CCRB) or the North Campus
Recreation Building (NCRB). Both
buildings offer a range of sports
opportunities from racket sports and
weight lifting to swimming and
track.
According to CCRB Building
Director Robert Fox, both centers
"provide a place where people can

take a little of the stress and strain
off."
Fox also said the sports facilities
provide a convenient means for
physical exercise which many
believe is vital to physical and
emotional well-being. "Medical
research has indicated that activity
does produce more effective and
more efficient working afterward,"
he said.
Several people interviewed said
that they use the CCRB to get
together with friends, while others

ings: place
said they go for the physical
enjoyment of it. "Some times after
a really heavy day of classes or
studying, I go just to get it all
out," Music School senior Jerry
Weir said.
Both the CCRB and NCRB offer
unique services. The CCRB keeps
lists of students looking for part-
ners for activities such as
racketball, tennis, and squash.
The NCRB offers the Outdoor
Recreational Center, which rents
outdoor sports equipment, sponsors
trips, and provides clinics which
discuss many of the aspects of
outdoor sports.
Canoes, windsurfers, camping
gear, bicycle accessories, and skis
are among the items the center rents
per day, per weekend, or per week.

s to play
Clinics are offered in bike repair and
canoeing, and trips include horse-
back riding, rock climbing, and
whitewater rafting.
The most frequent criticism of
the CCRB and the NCRB is that it
is difficult to make reservations for
racquetball, basketball, squash, and
other courts. Court users must
make their reservations during a set
one hour period on the day before
they intend to play. But there are
different reservation hours for
racquetball courts, squash courts,
and basketball courts, and the phone
lines are often busy when
reservations are accepted.
Both recreation building offer
free admission to students but
require faculty, staff, and guests to
purchase a pass.

NEED MONEY?
WORK FOR
HOUSING!
Jobs with Housing Division's
Food Service offer
4. 50 /hr. starting wages
FLEXIBLE HOURS
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
Phone or stop by the Food Service
Office of any Hall.
Alice Lloyd ..... 764-1183
Bursley . . . . . . . . 763-1121
East Quad... ...764-0136
Couzens-Hall ... 764-2142
Law Quad.. .3...764-1115
Mosher Jordan . 763-9946
Markley Hall ... 764-1151
South Quad .... 764-0169
Stockwell ...... 764-1194
West Quad ..... 764-1111
A non-discrininatory, affirmative action employer.

A . DOMINO'S
PIZZA
i DELIVERS"
" FREE.
WELCOME TO ANN ARBOR
and The University of Michigan
Domino's Pizza@ of Ann Arbor
would like to give you an
introductory Offer to our
delicious pizza.
---- --------- ---------

Daily Photo
A group of University students take some time off from studying and take
out a little stress on the basketball court of the Central Campus
Recreation Building.

9 9

Recreational Sports
Welcomes Students

Central Campus
761-1111
North Campus
769-5511
South West Quad
761-9393
Mich Daily
01987 Domino's Pizza

INTRODUCTORY
OFFER
A single 12' pizza
with one topping
FOR ONLY $4.50 plus tax
A savings of $1.48
Additional toppings 990
ONE COUPON PER ORDER
ANN ARBOR LOCATIONS ONLY
OFFER EXPIRES
September 30, 1987

*Get Excited * Get Energized e Get Exercised*
* Intramural Sports
- Sports Clubs
* Outdoor Recreation Center
" and much, much more!
Stop by one of our three indoor facilities
for further information on what
Recreational Sports can offer you.

4
I
0
0

Central Campus
Recreation Building
401 Washtenaw
763-3084

North Campus
Recreation Building
2375 Hubbard
763-4560

Intramural
Sports Building
606 E. Hoover
763-3562

I-

Stop by or call UHS Health Promotion and Community Relations

Stop by or call UHS Health Promotion and Community Relations
for a detailed information brochure.
U1:S

Department (763-1320)

WE WORK AS
LATE AS YOU DO

Health

Care

for the Campus Community
* Primary health care for students, UM faculty, staff, and significant others
* Confidential, anonymous AIDS testing and education

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