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September 10, 1987 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-10

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Page 8 -The Michigan Daily, Thursday, September 10, 1987
To many racism on
campus went to' far

I

Fleming chose damage
over possible injury

(Continued from Page 7)
In the Michigan League, the
regents vote to give jailed African'
National Congress leader Nelson
Mandela an honorary degree, which
is one of UCAR's 12 demands. '
March 20: Students sitting-in
at the Fleming Building move
outside and chain the doors to bar
any access. The action ends when
students realize that employees have
entered the building through under-
ground steam tunnels.
Nearly 50 student leave the sit-in
and march to the Michigan League
were the regents are meeting. The
students ask to be heard, but the
regents recess the meeting and
proceed to the Fleming Building.
The students follow Shapiro and
the regents to the building attemp-
ting to bar their entrance. They
demand to meet with Shapiro, and
at 11:15 a.m. he agrees speak with
them. During the meeting, Shapiro
agrees to hold two more meetings
the following week.
March 22: Reverend Jesse
Jackson arrives on campus to meet
with Black student leaders who have

asked him to come and help ease
the tensions on campus. Jackson is
scheduled to meet with Shapiro the
next day.
March 23: BAM III members
call off the scheduled meeting with
Shapiro, saying they want to await
the outcome of his talks with
Jackson. Jackson meets all day with
faculty members, students, and
other administrators as well as
Shapiro. Shapiro announces the
fruits of the negotiations at a rally
in Hill Auditorium. He announces
six resolutions to increase Black
student and faculty enrollment:
-the creation of the Vice Provost
for Minority Affairs position,
-an annual budget for the Black
Student Union,
-the appointment of a Black
senior administrator to the Office of
Affirmative Action,
-budgetary incentives to attract
and retain Black faculty and admin-
istrators.
-the weighing of affirmative
action accomplishment as part of
performance reviews for each depart-
ment, and
-the creation of a standing com-
mission to advise the president on
racial affairs.
In a speech following the
disclosure of the resolutions,
Jackson says he is pleased with the
outcome of the negotiations.
Although many see Shapiro's
resolutions as a step forward, the
battle is not completely won. Two
more racist fliers will appear in
Mosher Jordan Hall before the end
of March. And students will
discover that commencement key-
note speaker Mike Wallace is, him -
self, guilty of a racist incident six
years ago. Protests ensue.

Doily Photo by KAREN HANDELMAN
Turning away
A group of University graduates turn their backs on last spring's
commencement speaker Mike Wallace due to racist remarks he made six
years ago.
BAM to continue protests

(Continued from Page 6)
for other people to judge. There
were certainly critics - everybody
from the vice president of the
United States on down criticized
me. They said I was much too easy
on students.
We had very deep tensions
caused by the Vietnam War, which
I thought was wrong too and by
racial injustice which I have long
felt was wrong. I felt then, and I
still feel, that you can't subdue
protest by force. Things will get
out of hand occasionally. As I used
to tell the regents sometimes you
have a series of bad options, and the
question is which is the least bad
option.
D: You're saying a little damage
is better than calling in the national
guard and risking lives?
F: Yes, I would rather incur
some damage and get it over with
than bring in the sheriff. You'd get
some windows broken, but life
would go on. We'd get called names
by people who'd say we had no
guts because we didn't throw any
students in jail. The end result was
we didn't have anybody killed. We
didn't have any buildings blown up.
From our stand point we came out
ahead. But there were a lot of
people who disagreed with me.
D: Didn't some students feel
your methods frustrated any pro-
gress on the issues they were
advocating?
F: Yes, I know they felt that
way. That was, by and large,
because people who wanted to
change the University were fru-
strated because they couldn't bring
it about. (My tactic) wasn't well
done from their point of view
because it didn't allow them to

(Continued from Page 6)
A M O N G the fall plans for
dances, discussion, educational and
support groups for Asian students,
Lin said that a major UMASC
project will be examining
University admission policies for a
possible "cap" on Asian enrollment
that is now a common "and unfair"
practice at many universities.
Although the endless acronyms
may seem confusing to new
students, it is important to
remember only that minority
student activism will probably be a
powerful campus force come fall.

And while the names may
change, many of the sentiments are
the same - most notably student
activists' opinions of the admini -
stration. Described repeatedly as
"slow," "non-commital," and "say -
ing one thing and doing another,"
the administrations actions will be
the deciding factor in most minority
groups' fall plans..
"We would hope that they will
be as responsive in a non-crisis
situation as they were in a crisis
situation," said Ransby. "We hope
response won't come only from
people screaming at their doors."

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bring about their desired objectives.
It wasn't always well done from the
regents standpoint; the regents
sometime found it very hard to sit
and wait with me.
D: Last winter there was a rash
of protests on campus. Do you see
the University moving into another
period of heavy protesting?
F: People know numbers are
effective, so the protest were not
surprising. It did look like there
were more protests last year.
although if the racial thing hadn't
come along, I'm not sure if it
would have been thought of as
more.
D: So you don't foresee the
BAM III movement being as
disruptive as the original BAM
movement in 1970 when students
broke windows and trashed a couple
of the libraries?
F: Well, it didn't certainly
(winter semester). My impression
is that while the degree of rhetoric
is as high, tactically it is not as
serious as it was in 1970. I think
(disruptive protesting) is less likely'
because you don't have anything
like Vietnam which is unsettling to
the whole student body. You do
have the racial issue and that's an
ongoing, unsettled agenda. But,
clearly-the administration has taken
a lot of steps to try to deal with
that.
D: Do you have any advice for
President Shapiro or the future
president on how to deal with
protest?
F: No, I never give advice to
other people on how to del with
these things.
Profs: Past
protests had
more unity
(Continued frou Page 2)
agrees with Eldersveld that more
reaction could be expected if a
proposal which was more clearly a
code received approval.
"The strong reaction I anticipate
would come in the face of a
proposal passed by the regents that
was a straight out code," Weine
said.
Weine, whose Students First
party was considered the most
liberal in last year's MSA
elections, feels that his election
demonstrates a shift in student
attitudes. "I think the elections were
among several things that
demonstrate a shift in student
ideology." Weine said.
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