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September 25, 1987 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-25

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0 The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 25, 1987- Page 7

Size requirements lead
to discrimination suit

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CHICAGO (AP) - Libby-
Owens-Ford Co. will pay up to $10
million for lost wages and make 342
jobs available to women over five
years under a settlement with the
federal government of a sex
discrimination lawsuit, attorneys
said yesterday.
"This settlement is historic for its
cooperative disposition of a major
lawsuit," Charles Shanor, general
counsel of the Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission, said at a
news conference announcing the
agreement with the Ohio-based glass
manufacturer.
The settlement still must be
approved by a federal judge.
The EEOC filed the lawsuit in
1978 after receiving a complaint
from a woman who said she had
been denied a job at the company's
Ottawa Ill., plant because she didn't
meet minimum height and weight
requirements, he said.
Under a 16-year-old policy, the
company required factory employees
to be at least 5 feet, 4 inches tall and
weigh at least 110 pounds.
About1,700 women were refused
work at eight Libby-Owens-Ford
plants, and probably three times that
many refrained from applying
because they knew the company's
policy, said Margaret Herbert, an
EEOC attorney who worked on the

case.
All would be eligible to benefit
under the proposed settlement, to be
advertised in five states where the
company operates plants and in three
where it once did, said EEOC
attorney John Rowe.
"LOF's position is that its hiring
requirements were job-related and
necessary for the safe and efficient
operation of its plants," said Byron
Quandt, a company spokesperson.

Quandt added that the height-
weight requirement was used by the
company under terms of a 1971
consent decree, reached in federal
court in Toledo to set hiring
guidelines.
Under terms of the settlement,
outreach programs will be
established to try to locate women
excluded from jobs because of the
company's height and weight
requirements, EEOC attorneys said.

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Coming up for air
Clint Payne of Genesse Bay Construction Company takes a break after digging. The company is
constructing footings for girders extending the walkway in front of the Great Lakes Bank.

Visiting professor program
seeks to provide role models
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(Continued from Page 1)

has brought 16 instructors from var-
ious fields to the University last
year. One of the professors, Homer
; Neal, currently chairs the Universi-
ty's physics department.
Annette Bardouille-Crema, an of-
ficial at the Office for Minority Af-
fairs, said the state gave $80,000 to
the program last year. She said the
University, which will probably re-
ceive the same amount this year,
must match whatever funds the state
contributes.
Bardouile-Crema added that, al-
though the program is not designed
to recruit faculty members, it pro-
vides prospective professors with an
opportunity to work at the
University.
The University has already sched-
uled 18 visiting professors for this
year, but Crema said the figure will
probably increase because not all
the invitees have responded yet. The

professors come from such fields as basis for taking on role mo u , silo
Afro American studies, American said.
culture, classical studies, engineer- Lawrence Norris, engineering
ing, and Russian and East European school senior, said he met Prof.
studies. Robert Evans, of Cass Institute of
Minority Student Services Black Technology, through the program

r
F

IF YOU ORDERED'
LAST YEAR'S YEARBOOK...
1987 Ensians are still available for pickup at the
Student Publications Building,
420 Maynard, M-F, 8-5.
Bring some form of ID.

'If we can bring visiting professors to this campus, the
students will be exposed to a variety of faculty ...
which will enhance their basis for taking on role
models.'
- Barbara Robinson,
Minority Student Services Black Representative

Representative Barbara Robinson
feels the program directly benefits
minority students because it gives
role models.
"If we can bring visiting profes-
sors to this campus, the students
will be exposed to a variety of
faculty ... which will enhance their

last year.
But Norris thinks visiting
professors aren't at the University
long enough to fully establish
themselves as role models.
"As roles models per se, they
may not work out that way," he
said.

All purchased yearbooks
must be claimed by
December 31, 1987.

LNSIAN
ALL-CAMPUS YEARBOOK
EST 1897

Speaker urges continuation of
unfinished civil rights agenda

11

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(Continued from Page 3)
assault, the defeat of the Equal
Rights Amendment, and the debate
over Affirmative Action gains as
components of the current civil
rights struggle.
She said when she worked under
the Carter administration, Blacks had
positions in every level of the gov-
ernment. "We had people everywhere
and were working on the agenda"
She said during that time Black en-
rollment in college was equal to
white enrollment.
Now, she said, "Black students
are becoming a vanishing species."
She said it is important for Blacks to
be educated because "we need educa-
tion to change things."
Berry then discussed Supreme
e Court nominee Robert Bork's Senate
confirmation hearings, saying that
Bork would pose a serious threat to
civil rights legislation if allowed to
take the bench.
"He's a smart lawyer," Berry said.
But she said she does not believe
Bork has softened his conservative
stance on Constitutional issues like
freedom of the speech or press, as he
has indicated during the hearing.
"I'd rely on the statements Bork
has made in the past twenty years
rather than rely on what he's said to
get confirmed,' "Berry said..
Before Berry spoke, BSU Presi-
dent Jeffery Williams said that the
group will press the University ad-
ministration to make good on its
goals to increase the number of mi-
nority students and faculty on cam-
1i§101W
Gomia4

pus.
BSU member Denise Brooks said
the group will sponsor speakers, fo-
rums, and cultural events "to
synthesize unity on campus."
Brooks also said, "Ultimately our
goal is to aid and improve Black life
here."
Stephan Tibbs, BSU vice presi-
dent, told the group the welcoming
ceremony was BSU's first use of the
$35,000 it got through the

University administration's plan to
fight racism on campus.
Tibbs also warned students to be
aware of the administration's actions
on its promises to fight racism made
last year and be prepared to protest
again if necessary.
"We have learned we cannot
merely be reactive, but we must be
proactive," he said.

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