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September 24, 1987 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-24

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4at
Ninety-eight years of editorialfreedom
Volume XCVII - No.11 Ann Arbor, Michigan -Thursday, September 24, 1987 Copyright 1987, The Michigan Daily

Biden ends q
for White Hc
Dukakis 'saddened'

[est
ruse

by news

Daily Photo by ANDI SCHREIBER
Injured band members-(from left to right) Steve Pearson, Steve Damm, Liz Chamberlain, and Missy
Tajer-sit along the side of Elbell Field and watch the band practice for Saturday's football game.
Band practice gOeso
either rain or shine

WASHINGTON (AP) - Sen.
Joseph Biden ended his quest for the
1988 Democratic presidential nomi-
nation "with incredible reluctance"
yesterday, saying the "exaggerated
shadow" of mistakes made it
impossible to continue his candi-
dacy.
Biden withdrew from the cam-
paign after a week in which his
campaign was rocked by admissions
of plagiarism and false claims about
his academic record.
The Delaware Democrat is the
second candidate to be forced from
the race by questions of character and
integrity.
"I made some mistakes," Biden
told a room crowded with reporters,
his wife by his side. "Now the
exaggerated shadow of those mis-
takes has begun to obscure the es-
sence of my candidacy and the es-
sence of Joe Biden."
Biden said he had to choose be-
tween continuing his presidential
campaign and chairing the Senate
Judiciary Committee hearings on the

Supreme Court nomination o f
Robert Bork.
"And although it's awfully clear
to me what choice I have to make, I
have to tell you honestly I do it with
incredible reluctance and it makes me
angry. I'm angry with myself for
having been out in the position -
put myself in the position - of
having to make this choice," he said.
"And I am no less frustrated at the
environment of presidential politics
that makes it so difficult to let the
American people measure the whole
Joe Biden and not just misstatements
that I have made."
Biden refused to take reporters
questions and returned to the
Judiciary hearings, where he was
lauded by his fellow senators.
"I would like to say the Dem-
ocrats have no lost their most artic-
ulate spokesman," said Sen. Strom
Thurmond of South Carolina, the
ranking Republican on the commit-
tee.
Biden's rivals for the Democratic
nomination were quick to react to

maen
... withdraws from race
his withdrawal.
"It's one more down note," Rep.
Patricia Schroeder, (D-Colo.) "And I
think we all get' tarnished by that
type of news."
Biden's staff said the former
candidate would travel to Iowa and
New Hampshire today to thank his
supporters.

By ANDY JORDAN
On a blacktop practice ground near Elbel Field, the
Michigan Marching Band works to perfect its routines
every afternoon for an hour and a half, rain or shine.
And they do get rained on.
"You'd better go," some of them said as the storm
clouds rolled in for the second day in a row. "Trust us,
it'll get really bad."
It started to sprinkle.
"Are you crazy?"they said. "Go while you still
can!"
It was too late. The skies opened up and within a
few moments, 300 band members and their instruments
were drenched.
But that didn't stop them. The -band marched on

through the rain, practicing their formations until
given the signal to go dry off.
During Band Week, a.k.a. Hell Week which comes
immediately before the start of classes, band members
begin practicing and polishing at 9 a.m. and finish at 9
p.m.
Several of those who have gone through Band Week
described it as "very difficult." Mike Thomas, a first-
year student and trumpet player, said, "All you do is
march and eat."
Debra Gmerek, a former band member and current
fan, said that by the end of Band Week, "you are sore
and tired and ready for school to start so you can rest."
See BAND, Page 2

'U' law deans testify on
Bork's nomination

By NANCY DRISCOLL
Former Law School Dean Ter-
rance Sandalow will testify on the
Supreme Court nomination of
Robert Bork within the next week,
he said yesterday.
Sandalow, who supports the
nomination, testifies just days after
current law dean Lee Bollinger spoke
out against Bork before the Senate
Judiciary committee.
"Nobody appointed to the court in
my professional life, for the last 30
years, has had better qualifications
than Bork does," Sandalow said. He
is expected to give 20 pages of tes-
timony. Five present and former law
deans from other universities will be
on a panel with Sandalow.
Bollinger, an expert on the First
Amendment, said during the hearings
on Tuesday that Bork had a radical
view of the freedom of speech, not
shared by others in the judicial or
academic community.
"The main point I tried to make

is if you look at Bork's scholarly
writings and his speeches as a pro-
fessor, from 1971 to 1979, you see
that he took a position on freedom
of speech, a scope of the First
Amendment that was very narrow.
One of the central elements of his
view is that the First Amendment
should only protect political speech,
which is a very extreme view."
Bollinger, who spoke on a panel
with author William Styron and
artist Robert Rauschberg for about
an hour, said he met Bork in 1979
when the judge visited the Universi-
ty.
Although Bork has renounced his
limited view of First Amendment
protection during testimony at the
hearings, Bollinger isn't buying it.
"With someone who held a view
for so many years, and held it so
strongly, it's fair to say that's what
he really believes," Bollinger said.
See DEAN'S, Page 5

Burger
... supports Bork nomination

Burger endorses Bork, criticizes
opposition's techniques as 'hype'

WASHINGTON (AP) - Retired
Chief Justice Warren Burger, stirred
by what he called unprecedented dis-
information, declared yesterday that
Supreme Court nominee Robert
Bork is not "an extremist any more
than I'm an extremist" and deserves
confirmation.
Burger, in an extraordinary ap-
pearance for a sitting or former
member of the high court, told the
Senate Judiciary Committee, "If

Judge Bork is not in the mainstream
then neither am I. It would astonish
me to. think he's an extremist any
more than I'm an extremist."
In particular, he criticized paid
newspaper advertisements that have
suggested dire consequences for the
nation if Bork's nomination is con-

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Take that !
Sensei Gozo Shioda demonstrates Aikido Yoshinkai at the Michigan Theater last night. Shioda, a ninth degree
black belt, is a master of this Japanese martial art. See story, Page 7.

eph Biden (D-Delaware), and Sen.
Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), were over-
shadowed to some extent by Biden's
midday announcement that he was
withdrawing from the presidential
race.
Biden took time out from
presiding over the hearings to tell a
news conference he was quitting the
campaign in the wake of damaging
disclosures that he committed plag-
See RETIRED, Page 2

firmed.
The hearings, despite
appearance and a heated
later between committeec

Burger's
exchange
chair Jos-

Jazz for Life begins third seaso

By GRACE HILL
Jazz For Life, an organization that
uses music to raise money for poor
children, began plans for its third
year during an organizational and in-
formational mass meeting Monday
night.

'We want to move out like McDonald's and get going in
other areas.'
- Louis Johnson, jazz musician

i at 'U' INSIDE
The indictment of Gide
new fundraisers such as a raffle for a Israel is an indictme
hot air balloon ride. speech.
The group is presently in the pro- OPINI
cess of branching out with projects
in Ann Arbor, Detroit, and Milwau- The Papagena Opera (
kee. "We want to move out like production of Moza
McDonald's and get going in other Pastore comes to the
areas," said Johnson. Opera House this weeke

on Spiro in
nt of free
ON, Page 4
Company's
rt's Il Re
Kerrytown
end.

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t'pniacp mnthe~r ~wsrrntpnt rnwl

wnvc r~ino krk Qin frn~m Inwjinco~me

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