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September 23, 1987 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-23

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'The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, September 23, 1987- Page 11

0 Adamantly Speaking
a S BY ADAM OCHLIS
All right. On the count of three, everybody go on
strike. Hell, it's the in thing to do these days isn't it?
The pro football players are on strike at this moment,
and the pro basketball players are going on strike in
November. So on three, everybody just stop what
you're doing.
Whether it be taking notes in class, or doing the
dishes, just stop. I'll even join in and stop writing
this column. Let's prove a point.
One...
Two...
Three.
Now that you have no notes, the dishes aren't
done, and I've got a big blank space in the middle of
my column, don't you think our strike proved a lot?
About as much as this football strike is going to.
I'm a football fan. I like to watch football. Real
football. NFL style. Now I can't.
Yet the thing that irks me most is that this strike
is totally unnecessary. It also isn't going to be settled
for a while.
Granted I'm not familiar with the intricate details
of labor negotiations and collective bargaining
agreements. However, I do know, in my limited
wisdom, that both Gene Upshaw (the players union
representative) and Jack Donlan (the owners
representative) have to sit down together, stop talking
crap and start progressing on a new contract.
Thus, it came as a surprise to me (and I hope to
others) to watch the halftime show Monday and see
Upshaw in Washington and Donlan in New York.
"Something is wrong here," I said to my
roommate.
Is it just me or is this entire situation a senseless
hodgepodge of incompetent fools arguing with
another hodgepodge of incompetent fools? Both sides
knew the contract was going to run out, yet the first
series of talks didn't even commence until a month
ago. With eight major issues on the table, didn't
either side learn from the 1982 strike (which lasted 57

NFL strike talks...
..let's all do it
days) that it is difficult, er impossible, to settle their
differences in less than a month?
And on the same subject, didn't either side learn
anything from the last strike at all? The owners lost
millions of dollars, the players lost thousands of
dollars, and the NFL, some people argue, still hasn't
recovered. If the last strike kept a lot of fans away
from the stadium, what is this strike going to do?
Since both parties are too stupid to figure out the
answer to this question, I'll be glad to tell them -
it'll keep even more people away when they do come
back. Duh!
I know I'll be back, but a lot of people won't. In
addition, it's not like the NFL is over forever.
Eventually, the players will be back. None of them,
if they had their druthers, even want to strike.
The younger players don't understand what they are
striking over. The older players, who earn a lot of
money, would rather keep earning their salary than
hold picket signs - especially since the strike is
mainly for players who just entered the league. The
only people who really want to strike are Upshaw,
Brian Holloway (the big-mouthed Raider offensive
tackle) and a few of the player reps. But no one wants
to defy the union, and so we have a strike.
For the first time in the pro sports' strike era
(since 1981), I side with the owners. The players are
being ludicrous. Free agency is not going to occur.
Period. Once the players get this in their head, we'll
have football again.
"But what happens if we suffer a career-ending
injury?," is another player complaint. "We want to be
assured financial security the rest of our lives."
I have never and will never buy this argument. The
players all went to college in case this happens. They
received access to an education. If they didn't use that
opportunity to their advantage, well that's their
problem. Besides, the owners are willing to increase
the pension benefits.
The resolution: The strike will either last five days
or five weeks. When the players do come back,
they'll probably come back complaining that they
didn't get what they wanted anyway. But football will
be back, the players having proved nothing.
And you'll still be without class notes, and the
dirty dishes will still be waiting for you in the sink.

Serving-ace Davidson leads 'M'
s pikers past Bowl ing Green

By PETER ZELLEN'
Big Ten volleyball look out. Here
come the Wolverines. Michigan
continued to impress and improve as
it swept Bowling Green last night,
17-15, 15-7, and 16-14, to raise its
record to 11-2.
"We played some really good
volleyball," said Wolverine head
coach Joyce Davis.
The first game was a tough and
drawn out victory. With Bowling
Green leading, 14-13, Michigan
failed to convert on four consecutive
serves. The Wolverine defense,
however, kept them alive. Michigan
prevented the Falcons from scoring
until it could tie the game. Rising
star sophomore Karen Marshall came
in to notch the final two points for
the victory.
THE SECOND game was a
blowout. Michigan dominated with
good defense and blocking. Freshman
Julia Sturm had two powerful blocks
early in the game that exemplified
the Wolverines play. "Sturm and
Kim Clover had great games at the
net tonight," stated Davis. At one
point Michigan led 11-3.
The third game capped an exciting
evening at the Intramural Building.
The Falcons took control early with
excellent all-around play. They served
effectively, blocked successfully, and
set up their shots well. T h e
Wolverines looked tired and ragged
but refused to quit. The outlook
seemed dim for Michigan as Bowling
Green led, 13-4.
But heroes emerged. Marie-Anr
Davidson's turned the tide on her
serve. The six-foot junior from
Ontario, Canada came in and served
point after point to rally Michigan to
a 13-13 tie. The team enjoyed a
swing in momentum.
CLOVER AND T h u r m
continued their defensive prowess
throughout the game. Senior co-
captain Lisa Vahi lost her serve.
Bowling Green scored one on it next
drive to make it 14-13 Falcons.
With fire in their eyes, the
Wolverines took charge. Michigar
served for three-straight points with
its other senior co-captain Heather
Olsen getting the final kill for the
victory and the match.

"The keys to the match were that
we passed and served real well, and
we didn't allow strings of points,"
said Davis.
The Wolverines received more

good news yesterday. Junior Carla
Hunter is working out after knee
surgery and is expected back in
October for the second week of Big
Ten matches.

THE SPORTING VIEWS

Early start for NHL...
...Red Wings ready

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY
Michigan's Karen Marshall (10) watches the result of her spike in
last night's victory against Bowling Green.
AIKIDO k
DEMONSTRATION!
Tonight-Sept. 23-From Japan, see one of the world's highest
ranking aikido masters, 9th degree black belt Gozo Shioda, at the
Michigan Theatre, 6:30 pm. Tickets $10 at the door.
INTRODUCTION TO AIKIDO
An introductory course taught by Sensei Takashi Kushida, 8th
degree black 1belt from Japan. Two classes start in October:
- Thursdays 6:30-7:30 pm (October 1, 8, 15, 22)
- Saturdays 10:30-11:30 am (October 3, 10, 17, 24)
Cost: $15 for four sessions. Classes held in the Genyokan Dojo
in Ann Arbor, 749 Airport Blvd. (behind the State Rd. K-Mart).
For information, call 662-4686.
AIKIDO YOSHINKAI ASSOCIATION OF NORTH AMERICA

By JOHN McDERMOTT
As autumn officially arrives, the
last thing on the minds of most
sports fans is the National Hockey
League. But, early as it seems, the
Red Wings have already begun their
exhibition season.
With the Stanley Cup completed
less than four months ago, the
players are gearing for another 80-
game schedule to eliminate five
teams. Then it's on to four rounds of
playoffs to crown the eventual
league champion.
Some say the season is too long,
and too many teams make the
playoffs. It is unfair that the team
with the best record during the
regular season could lose in the first
round to the 16th-best team.
THE NHL responds to these
complaints by pointing out it has no
big-money television contracts so it
,,relies on the long season and
extensive playoff system to pay the
bills. The league can also point to
its frequent dynasties, a thing of the
past in other major sports, as
evidence that its playoff system
works. The Stanley Cup final
usually features two deserving clubs.
To true fans, though, the long
season means more opportunities to
take in a good hockey game. '.
Locally, there is more reason than
ever to anticipate the upcoming
season. Not since the Gordy Howe
era have the Detroit Red Wings
excited their fans the way they did
a last year, and there is no reason to
think that this campaign won't be as
successful or better.
Under the guidance of new head
M coach Jacques Demers, the Wings
compiled a 34-36-10 record and
advanced to the Campbell
Conference finals. After a hard
fought loss in that series to the
Oilers, the league's most dominant
team, Detroit proved that the
nickname Dead Wings no longer
applies.
General Manager J i m m y
Devellano has assembled a young
team capable winning the Norris
Division crown. As a potentially
good team in a bad division, they
have a chance of returning to the
xconference finals. The most obvious
reason for the turnabout is last year's
SDemers, last year's NHL Coach of
the Year. He motivated his young
team to play above itself last season,
and this year he's dealing with even
' more experience and talent.

Adam Oates, Shawn Burr, Gerard
Gallant, and the erratic Petr Klima
are all capable of putting the puck in
the net. It's just a matter of these
players maturing together.
The defense, ranked fifth in the
NHL last year, appears to be strong.
Led by Darren Veitch, Lee Norwood,
and Mike O'Connell, they should
once again provide adequate
protection for the right-handed, left-
handed goaltending combination of
Greg Stefan and Glen Hanlon. The
defense is a tough-checking unit re-
enforced by the two scrappy veteran
goalies.
The key, however, may lie in
avoiding mental breakdowns. There
are strict new rules against fighting,

and Demers must calm some of the
more feisty players. After leading the
league in penalties last year, the
coach is ready to crack down.
The recent demotion of Joe Kocur
for disciplinary reasons proves that
Demers won't let the players rest on
their laurels. After the team's recent
weekend sweep of the St. Louis
Blues, he also warned the veterans
that many of the new players are
ready to step in. That motivational
comment should push all of the
veterans.
This is a potentially big year for
the Red Wings, so with the
possibility of no pro football to
watch, why not enjoy an NHL
game, even in the fall?

O ┬░

ija

"
L,
i o

/O/Q'

r L/-r

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