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September 22, 1987 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-22

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RTS
The Michigan Daily Tuesday, September 22, 1987

Two

new

exhibits

fill 'U'

Pae 7
galleries

"36th Annual Exhi-
bition of W o m e n
Painters," R a c k h a m
Galleries, Third Floor
The 36th Annual Exhibition of the
Ann Arbor Women Painters is
hidden away in Rackham's third
floor gallery. Judging by the guest
log, however, quite a few people
have managed to find it. That's
food; the exhibit is interesting and it
deserves to be seen.
This year's show features 60
pieces by 40 artists. These are
,mainly watercolors and oils, but
work in screenprint, pastel, ink,
'acrylic, and photography is also on
display. Of all the paintings, two are
most immediately striking. "Jungle
Dream," a vivid piece by Maureen
"Hoffman, is the winner of one of the
exhibition's Merit awards.
"Wicker Garden" by Jane Coates
is also very well-executed. Coates
},currently has work on display at the
Ann Arbor Art Association. Her
style is pleasing and distinctive.

All the paintings exhibited are in
competition and for sale. This year's
juror is William Lewis, a professor
of art at the University. Lewis says
he based his selections on "quality in
composition and content,
successfully expressed."
Bearing this in mind, some of
Lewis' selections seem arbitrary.
Honorable mention was awarded to
some rather prosaic pieces while
more unusual work was ignored.
"Liberty After the Rain," Barbara
MacKeller's watercolor of traffic on
East Liberty, was uncited.
"Primitive Music," Benita
Goodman's Dada-influenced collage,
was also passed over.
The main criticism of the
Rackham exhibit is that few, if any,
of the paintings shown are extremely
innovative or startling. The artists
have,
by and large, chosen to pursue well-
traveled paths. Their work is good
but traditional. This does not negate
the value of the show, however, and
anyone interested in local talent
should stop by Rackham Galleries
this month, weekdays 10 a.m. - 5

p.m. or Saturdays 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.
The exhibit will move to the
University Hospital Galleries
October 5th through the 30th.
-Avra Kouffman
"Native Americans of
the Northwest Terri-
tories," University
Museum of Art
Throughout the rest of September
and until the 11th of October, the
University's Museum of Art is
sponsoring a visual history lesson of
the Native Americans of the
Northwest Territories, with works
dated from 3,500 B.C. to 1985 A.D.
The exhibit, honoring the
Bicentennial of the Constitution and
Michigan's Sesquicentennial,
features the works of individuals
from the Chippewa, Winnebago,
Eastern Sioux, Potawatomi, and
Ottawa tribes.
The works, totaling close to
eighty objects, are divided into five
categories, according to the purposes

they served for the Indian tribes.
Each honors the culture of the tribes
from which they were made.
The oldest category, the lithic
tools, contains stone implements
including birdstones from the Late
Archiac period 1500-1000 B.C.
The fine details demonstrate the
accuracy needed to make the tools
functional.
The other four categories
represent works of later times than
the lithic tools. Instead they stress
the sign of the times when the
objects were created. In the ceramic
and bark containers category, the
ceramic bowls presented from 100
B.C. to 1600 A.D. stress the
Indians' need to create functional
objects. The variety of design on the
bowls, ranging from crude stick
marks to intricate bird designs, stress
the individual's use of creativity.
The bark containers exhibited,
however, were created after the
tribes' contact with European settlers
and traders. The European influence

is represented by the fact that these
containers, made of birch bark and
decorated with moose hair, porcupine
quills, and natural dyes began to be
made for trade instead of for personal
containers.
The bandolier bags from the
Chippewa and Winnebago tribes
represent the greatest influence of the
European Settlement in the exhibit.
These bags were originally created
with animal skins and decorated with
porcupine quills. The exhibit
contains one such bag, dated from
the early 1800s. The other seven
bags, however, were created after
European contact, and are decorated
with imported glass beads and cotton
and wool.
The pipe bowls show the sense
of tradition and continuity that also
marked the American Indian history.
All 12 pipe bowls are typical of the
middlel9th century design and
construction of black stone, pewter,
and lead. The importance of the pipe
bowls is shown by the 1837 peace

medal displayed that is illustrated
with a handshake,. the tomahawk,
and the peace pipe.
The two contemporary drawings
by George Morrison and Lowe
portray the Indian concern for the
spiritual environment, thus stressing
the continuity of the American
Indian tradition. Photographs that are
displayed above the artworks are a
reminder that there are people behind
these historical artworks.
In conjunction with the exhibit,
various programs featuring local
Native American culture will be
presented at the museum. On
October 4, atl p.m., Jerry Hopeless,
a champion Alogonquin traditional
dance and craftsman, will present
oral history stories. The White Eye
Drum Group will also be featured.
-Marie Wesaw

'Condom Sense' delivers mes

sage

By Lisa Pollack
The 25-minute film Condom
Sense, being shown tonight in
conjunction with Safer S e x
Awareness Day, has been billed by
various press releases as a "wildly
funny and enormously entertaining
film."
That may be an exaggeration.
What this 1981 film does offer is a
wildly original and enormously
informative presentation of the
misconceptions and facts
surrounding condom use. As an
educational film, it works.
Condom Sense, however, is
certainly not going to be winning
any awards for its style, direction,

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.;
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writing, or acting. Lead actor
Michael Pritchard - a cross between
a shaggy Gomer Pyle and columnist
Bob Greene - plays at least seven
different roles. One is a giant penis.
Get the idea? The theme song - "I
don't want no baby now/Keep using
that condom sense" - is crooned to
music reminiscent of what happens
when you push the auto-percussion
button on a do-it-yourself home
synthesizer. The awkward script is
uttered with a minimum o f
eloquence. A typical exchange (no
set-up necessary):
Connie Sense: (Before having
sex) "Condom, think."
Condo the Magnificent: "But I
can't think about anything but you,
Connie."
Connie Sense: "Condo, think
about a small latex object that goes
on your penis."

And so on. But truthfully, it
seems rather low to artistically
evaluate a film that in such a small
space manages to dispense so much
solid information about how and
why condoms are used. The writers
obviously put some time into

THE
Uof M PUBLIC SERVICE INTERN PROGRAM
MASS MEETING: Summer A
Sept. 23,6:00 pm for All
Inder- /A% \

devising a wealth of "condom
rationalizations" like the following.
"Condoms are as natural a s
showering with a ring on your
finger."
"If it's okay to dance close with
See FILM Page 8

Rackham Auditorium
Application
Deadline:
October 1

graduates
CareerPlanning
& Placement
AUnit of
Student Services

Starship guitarist Craig Chaquico (left): "I use condoms."

U

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