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September 22, 1987 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-22

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4

Page 2 -The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 22, 1987
Campus magazine shifts focus

IN BRIEF

By FRANCIE ARENSON
The days of the big blue cover are
gone for The Michigan Review, just
one part of the magazine's staff move
to moderate The Review's reputation
as a "Republican rag."
Originally a 16-page tabloid, The
Review was established six years ago
as a conservative response to The
Michigan Daily, according to Editor
in, Chief Seth Klukoff. W it h
decreased political discrepancy
between the two papers, and
increasing financial problems,
however, the Review's editorial board
decided to start fresh this month with
a new 32-page magazine format and
editorial concept.
Rather than attempting to combat
and compete with the Daily, the
Review now tries to serve as its
complement, Klukoff said.
The board hopes students will
come to rely on The Review for
intensive coverage of issues, as they
do The Daily for day-to-day reports.
"The Review, by nature, is different
than the Daily," said Executive
Editor Rebecca Chung. "Articles
take months of research. We have a
month.We can reflect."
"We have decided to fill the void

on campus for a thorough, well-
written student affairs magazine,"
wrote Klukoff in this month's issue.
"To that end we will attempt to
cover, in complete a manner as
possible, the major issues which
affect the University of Michigan."
Although the magazine maintains
a moderate slant, its staff encourages
the objective discussion of ideas. To
this end, each issue contains a
Review Forum column through
which controversial issues are
debated. Said Klukoff, "The new
Review provides students with a
much needed forum for rational dis-
cussion."
The first issue of the revised
Review includes articles on a wide
range of topics. Stories range from
"U.S. Policy in Central America" to
a discussion of "Pop vs. Soda." The
issue features the beginning of a
series of exclusive interviews with
presidential candidates of both the
Republican and Democratic parties.
The September edition of The
Review also includes an analysis of
the Madonna craze and articles
covering women's issues,
engineering, and sports. In upcoming
issues, the staff hopes to embellish
the art and investigative sections.
Reports on minority and academic
affairs and PIRGIM will also be

included.
In response to the new Review,
Daily Editor in Chief Rob Earle,
said, "I like the direction they're
moving. However, I never saw them
as competition. We're not connected
any more than Time Magazine is
connected to the New York Times.
It's hard for a monthly magazine to
compete with a daily paper."
The Review decided to change its

format last April.
"There was approximately a four
fold increase in cost going from the
tabloid to the magazine," said
Publisher David Katz. "Funds were
raised through fund raising,-
advertisement, and private donation."
The Review is a non-profit organi-
zation and is not affiliated with a'
political party or the University,
according to the magazine's logo.

Alleged assault victim
begins testimony in court

(Continued from Page 1)
Defense attorney Steven Boak
began to establish that point during
his cross examination, yesterday,
when he questioned the victim about
discrepancies between her statements
during the pre-trial examination and
her testimony before the jury. He
constantly asked whether her memo-
ry was better now than it had been
during the weeks following the inci-
dent.
She responded to his probing of
her memory by saying, "I may have
gotten things out of sequence at the
preliminary exam," before denying
Boak's inference thatshe rhadpossi-
bly changed her story.
THE PROSECUTOR said the

victim had diverged from what she
had previously said, but both he and
the defense attorneys declined any
further comment.
One point of contention was the
time period surrounding the alleged
assault. The witness maintained she
is not clear about the timing of rele-
vant events as she did not have a
watch on, nor could she see a clock.
Also, the defense questioned her rec-
ollection of the loft in which the al-
leged rape took place as what she
testified to remember differs from the
type of loft existing in the room,
according to police pictures.
Neal previously pleaded not.
guilty to the rape charge, which car-
ries a maximum penalty of life im-
prisonment. He also has filed a civil
suit charging the victim with false
prosecution, defamation of character,
and intentional infliction of emo-
tional distress, in which he is seek-
ing legal fees and damages in excess
of S10,000.

Compiled from Associated Press reports
Reagan urges Mideast peace
UNITED NATIONS - President Reagan confronted Iran at the
United Nations yesterday with a demand that it must "clearly and
unequivocally" accept a cease-fire in its Persian Gulf war with Iraq or
face a worldwide arms embargo spearheaded by the United States.
Reagan set a new deadline of 24 hours for Tehran to accept the cease-
fire resolution approved unanimously July 20 by the U.N. Security
Council
Referring to the speech Iranian President Ali Khamenei is scheduled
to deliver today to the 42nd U.N. General Assembly session, the
president said: "I take this opportunity to call upon him clearly and
unequivocally to state whether Iran accepts 598 (the resolution) or not.
"If the answer is positive, it would be a welcome step and major
breakthrough. If it is negative, the council has no choice but rapidly to
adopt enforcement measures."
Atlanta mayor criticizes Bork
WASHINGTON - Civil rights leaders yesterday urged the Senate
to reject the nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court, with
Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young attacking him as "a protector of
privilege and power rather than opportunity and freedom."
Had Bork's views prevailed in the United States, Young testified,
"Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would not be a venerated national hero. He
would instead be serving a jail sentence in Alabama."
Young, a former aide to King, told the Senate Judiciary Committee:
"I might have been branded a terrorist and jailed for my participation in
the civil rights movement instead of becoming the first black elected to
Congress from Atlanta in more than 100 years."
UAW, GM negotiate contract
DETROIT - United Auto Workers union leaders turned their
attention Monday to how they will make the job-protecting pact with
Ford Motor Co. fit General Motors Corp., the nation's largest
manufacturer.
But that may turn out to be less difficult than it appears because the
UAW purposely created a contract designed to be. a pattern for the
industry, said Harley Shaiken, labor relations expert with the
University of California at San Diego.
"What was just concluded at Ford were not simply Ford negotiations
but industrywide negotiations that happened to take place at Ford. This
was not an agreement tailored to Ford's particular condition but rather
an agreement negotiated at Ford, tailored to the UAW's perception of
the industry," Shaiken said.
"Were the contract tailored specifically to Ford, it probably would
have been significantly richer," he said.
Jury selection begins in
LaRouche conspiracy trial
BOSTON - Jury selection began yesterday for the trial of political
extremist Lyndon LaRouche, five of his organizations and seven aides
on federal charges that they raised more than $1 million through credit
card fraud and then conspired to obstruct an investigation.
LaRouche was absent, campaigning for the presidency, his lawyer
said.
An unsettled dispute over the prosecutor's job status left the
availability of key government witnesses uncertain.
The case, coming to trial after a year of maneuvering by the
government and 19 defence attorneys, began with screening of more
than 300 prospective jurors.

IF YOU ORDERED
LAST YEAR'S YEARBOOK...
1987 Ensians are still available for pickup at the
Student Publications Building,
420 Maynard, M-F, 8-5.
Bring some form of ID. 9

All purchased yearbooks
must be claimed by
December 31, 1987..

IZNSIAN
ALL-CAMPUS YEARBOOK
EST. 1897

Ii _________

I.

,
'*

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDERGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM SERIES
ANNOUNCES:
A CALL FOR PAPERS
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNDERGRAD UATE
COLLOQUIUM SERIES IS A PROGRAM SPONSORED BY THE
UNDERGRADUATE INITIATIVES FUND AND THE MICHIGAN
STUDENT ASSEMBLY. CREATED AND IMPLEMENTED BY
STUDENTS, IT IS ENVISIONED AS PROVIDING A MEDIUM
THROUGH WHICH STUDENTS FROM DIVERSE AREAS OF THE
UNIVERSITY CAN PRESENT PAPERS ON TIMELY EDUCATIONAL
AND SOCIETAL ISSUES TO THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY FOR
PEER INPUT AND DISCUSSION.
ALL PAPERS SUBMITTED BYAND RESTRICTED TO UNDER-
GRADUATES WILL BE REVIEWED BY STUDENTS AND FACULTY,
WHEREUPON THREE TO FOUR PAPERS WILL BE SELECTED FOR
ORAL PRESENTATIONAND PUBLICATION IN A BOUND
COLLOQUIUM SERIES EDITION AND ADVICE. A PANEL OF SIX
STUDENTS IN ADDITION TO A "DISTINGUISHED GUEST" WILL
COMMENT ON AND PROPOSE RELEVANT QUESTIONS ON VARIOUS
POINTS AND ISSUES ADDRESSED BY THE STUDENT READ PAPERS.
PARTICIPATION BY THE AUDIENCE WILL BE IN THE FORM. OF
QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS DIRECTED TO READERS, PANEL
MEMBERS AND THE DISTINGUISHED GUEST.
TOPIC: "INDIVIDUALISM, SOCIETY AND A
LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION"
DISTINGUISHED GUEST: RALPH KETCHAM
PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR
(PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE,
HISTORY, AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS,
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, NY)

EXTRAS
Soviet baubles baffle leaders
MOSCOW - Dolls whose hair falls out or whose legs don't match
or chemistry sets that can send a budding young scientist to the hospital
or a toy camel that, for no apparent reason, has stripes like a zebra are
some of the poorly designed and shoddily manufactured toys now being
created for Soviet boys and girls, Pravda reported.
"You rarely find so much junk, lack of taste, and technical ineptitude
as you do in the toy sector," the Communist Party daily said in a sharp
criticism of goods on sale in Soviet toy stores.
Under Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, the Kremlin leadership has
vowed to improve the quality and variety of housing, food, and other
goods, but admits that progress is slow. There has been little time to deal
with consumer items, even though Pravda said toys have a serious side
that should concern everyone.
"In essence, all of us who are now adults, even the most important
and serious among us, began with toys," said Pravda columnist V.
Prokhorov.
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.
Vol. XCVIII- No.9
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$25 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term: $13
in Ann Arbor; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub -
scribes to the Los Angeles Times Syndicate and the National Student
News Service.

Editor in Chief.................................ROB EARLE
Managing Editor ..................AMY MINDELL
New, Editor...... .........PHILIP I. LEVY
City Editor ...............MELISSA BIRKS
Feature Editor ...r...................MARTIN FRANK
University Editor...... ....KERY MURAKAMI
NEWS ST A Elizabeth Atkins, Vicki Bauer, Eve
Becker, Steve Blonder, Jim Bray, Dov Cohen,
Hamnpton Dellinger, Kenneth Dintzer, Sheala Durant,
Stephen Gregory, Edward Kleine, Steve Knopper,
Carrie Loranger, Michael Lustig, Alyssa Lustiginan,
Jerry Markon, Andrew Mills, Eugene Pak, Lisa Pollak,
Melissa Ramnsdell, Martha Sevetson, Steve Tuch, David
Webster, Rose Mary Wummiel.
Opinion Page Editors...................PETER MOONEY
HENRY PARK
ABsoc. Opinion Page Editor....CALE SOUTHWORTH
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Muzammil Ahimed,
Rosemary Chinnock, Tim Huet, Josh Levint, Jeff
Rutherford, Steve Semenuk, Mark Williams.
Arts Editors .......................BRIAN BONET
BETH FERTIG
Books ........................LISA MAGNINO
Film.........................................JOHN SHEA
Theatre......................................AMY KOCH

Walter Kopf, Rob Levine, Ian Ratner, Adam Schufter,
Adam Schrager, Scott Shaffer, Pete Steinert, Douglas
Volan, Peter Zellen, Bill Zolla.
Photo Editors .. ...........SCOTT LITUCHY
ANDI SCHREIBER
PHOTO STAFF: Karen Handelman, Dana
Mendelssohn, John Munson, GrameTsai.
Weekend Editors...........REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
ALAN PAUL
Business Manager..............REBECCA LAWRENCE
Sales Manager.............................ANNE KUBEK
Assistant Sales Manager................KAREN BROWN
SALES STAFF: Gail Belennni, Sherri Blansky, Julie
Bowers, Valerie B ier, Pam Bullock, Stephanie Burg,
Milton Feld, Kim Feuerstein, Lisa George, Michelle
Gill, Jeff Grant, Missy Hambrick, Ginger Heyman,
Mary Johnson, Matt Lane, Denis Levy, Jodi Manchik,
Mindy Mendonsa, Eddy Meng. Jackie Miller, Jaunie
Parsells, Jackie Rosenberg, Jennifer Rowe, Jim Ryan,
Laura Schlanger, Jennifer Siegel, Michelle Slavik, Mary
Snyder.
NATIONALS: Michelle Ketcham

DATE AND PLACE:
PAPER LENGTH:
T%" 9A ~T T FLTT~lW

DECEMBER 5,1987, SCHORLING AUD.,
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
1100-1700 WORDS

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