100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Monday, September 21, 1987- Page 5
Miss Michigan receives Miss

America crown in

By LISA GEBAUER
Miss Michigan Kaye Lani Rae
Rafko emerged as the winner of the
1988 Miss America Pageant Saturday
night, and her victory may draw
some national attention to the state.
Rafko, a Monroe resident, won
the swimsuit competition and per-
formed a Hawaiian-Tahitian dance in
the talent competition before
continuing to the final stages of the
contest Saturday.
Miss Michigan cited AIDS as
one of the major problems facing the
country. A registered nurse, Rafko
hopes to obtain a master's degree
from the University and manage a
hospice program. As winner of the
pageant, she will receive a $30,000

cash scholarship.M
"I find it gratifying to hear of
someone committed to staying in
nursing," said Dr. Phillip Kalisch, a
professor in the University School
of Nursing. "She has a real opportu-
nity to promote a positive image of
nursing and I hope she takes advan-
tage of it."
Miss America's impact on stu-
dents, however, appears to be slight.
"I would have rather watched 'Satur-
day Night Live,"' Denis Dolgachev,
an LSA junior, said. "Beauty con-
tests are harmless entertainment, but
the traits and talent which they
praise are pretty useless."
Not everyone feels the entertain-
ment is harmless. Lynn Sanders, a

ageant
graduate student who has taught
classes in Feminist and Political
Theory, feels such contests are po-
tentially harmful in supporting
traditional concepts of women.
"Teaching, singing, and nursing are
valuable careers, but they are careers
which are not only for women."
But Sanders said the fact that
most people seem to view the con-
test as a source of laughable enter-
tainment is perhaps a healthy sign.
Engineering first year student
Matt Supina found the evening en-
tertaining, "It was fun to see Miss
Michigan win... although I did think
it was odd that she won by perform-
ing a Hawaiian dance."

Rafko
...gets crowned

Daily Photo by ANDI SCHREIBER
Ann Arbor resident Bob Corrie helps out Thursday with a bucket drive
to benefit the Women's Crisis Center.
Bucket drive raises over
$2,000 for crisis center

Taubman Program
in American Institutions
Summer Internships
Business
Government
Social Organizations
Unions
Mass Meeting
September 21, 4:00 P.M
Kuenzel Room
Michigan Union
Application Deadline: September 30
For more information, call 763-2584
TUESDAY LUNCH FORUM
at the
INT ER NATIONALCENTER - 603 E. MADISON

CHISTIN

FELLOWSHIP

Students Dedicated to
Knowing and
Communicating
Jesus Christ!

Pastor Mike Caulk
Diag Evangelist
Tuesdays
7p.m.
2231 Angell Hall
971-9150

i Cornerstone

By ELIZABETH ATKINS
The Women's Crisis Center of
Washtenaw County raised over
$2,000 on Thursday and Friday in
their largest fundraiser of the year.
The money will be used to increase
the center's resources for women.
Andrea Walsh, a coordinator of
the center, said the annual bucket
drive raises between $1,000 and
$2,500 for the center's $30,000
budget each year. She said the mon-
ey goes to the center's general fund
and helps pay for free counseling
services, crisis intervention, support
groups, its monthly newspaper, fi-
nancial assistance for women in
sums less than $50, and its library
of women's books.
Walsh said the drive was success-
ful. "It was nice to have such great
community support. The success
shows how much everyone recog-
nizes the need for the Women's Cri-
sis Center," she said.
The center, which started in 1972,
helps women who are victims of
sexual assault and domestic violence;
counselors refer patients to other re-
sources in the city. It also sponsors
support groups for women, includ-
ing Self-Defense, Divorce and Sepa-
ration, Anti-Racism, and Compul-
slive Eating.
"We teach empathy and problem
Normandie
Flowers
1104 S. UNIVERSITY
996-1811
2 1 Carnations
WITH THIS COUPON
(Good unlt 9125187)
Q Resumes
Q Word Processing
Q Transparencies
QBooks
QBinding
QBrochures
Q Typesetting
Q Padding
1 Carbonless Forms
Q Business Cards
Q Color Copying
Q Dissertations
Q Stapling
rl Resumes

solving to help women with their
problems. Women just don't have.
the same economic advantages as
men," said Catherine Fischer, a cen-
ter coordinator.
Walsh said between 20 and 60
volunteers, including many students,
participate in the bucket drive each
year, and work one or two hour
shifts from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
"There's quite a lot of support
(for the bucket drive). Some people
who give money are familiar with
the center and want to help, but there
a lot of people who just want to
make sexist jokes," Fischer said.
"There's something about women
helping women. We've left it up to
men and nothing happened, so we're
doing it ourselves," said Kim Kratz,
a public health and social work
graduate student.

September22: "Developments In Nigeria,
Prospects and Problems"
Speaker: Victor Obinna, University of Michigan
doctoral candidate In Urban Planning, from Nigeria
ared by: Lunch Available:
cumenical Campus Center $1.00 (students)
he International Center $1.50 (others)

Sponso
The E
Sandth

gi

I lc It ucI I Ia wl 1c 1 vv av

A

(no I , r rArd
t ariu . l~d 40
ab v*l 1~4 .j moo eke
,d D Q y c ye

Join
the
Daily
Arts
Page
Call: 763-0379

mass rn

HALLOWEEN

SEPTEMBER
UAC C
2ND FLOOR M
parade, bonfire, twister, p
U-club happy hour, & mo

HOMECOMING
ieeting
22, 23, 7:30
)FFICES
ICHIGAN UNION
Sep rally
re

Can I tell you
something personal?
P
0
Personals

(/

- -Mpw

w

MEMO

mmm -

D

.
l!* X
f

1

i

Copies
121

1 f ,

A.

WE SPEAK TECHNOLOGY.
DO YOU?
If you're a science or engineering major. you II wart to be part of
today's Air Force. We're developing lasers and satellites that make
science fiction seem dated Air Force ROTC is one way to be part of
this fast-paced technology
Air Force ROTC has 2- through 4-year scholarship programs that
can help defray some of the college costs, plus you'l receive $100 per
academic month for living expenses
After graduation, you'll be an Air Force officer and will join those who

i

I.

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan