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September 18, 1987 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-18

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4

ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Friday, September 18, 1987

Page 10

A

Local film fest

begins

By Daniel Rosenberg
The 25th Ann Arbor Film
Festival (AAFF) returns to its roots
this weekend at the Performance
Network with a series of films Made
in Michigan. What started in 1963 as
a forum for local filmmakers to
display their works has become one
of North America's most
prestigious, and longest running
16mm festivals; this year's festival
features films from six continents.
The Festival series' fin al
installment, Made in Michigan,
features only local talent. However,
what is lacking in diversity is made
up for with quality.
Tonight's show features the Ann
Arbor production company, Meridian
Films. The program begins at 8
p.m. with "Waiting Tables," a
documentary on the food service
industry. F o r m e r
waitpersons-turned-filmmakers Pam
Chapman, Freddi Stevens Jacobi, and
Pam LeBlanc produced this 20
minute video exploring the
principally female profession
shrouded by stereotypes and public
misconceptions.

This award-winning film (First
place in the Great Lakes Film
Festival) successfully mixes social
commentary with light-hearted
humor. Featured is an interview with
Gloria Steinem, where she discusses
the labor group for which she coined
the term "pink collar,"and a routine
by Lily Tomlin as a struggling
actress trying to make it as a
waitress.
Following "Tables" will be
Meridian's 1982 Academy Award
Nominee, "See What I Say." The
concert film shows feminist
folksinger Holly Near accompanied
by American Sign Language
interpreter Susan Freundlich, who
combines both mime and dance to
communicate Near's message. This
film provides a unique opportunity
for communication between the
hearing and the deaf.
Tomorrow night's show features
animations by Andrea Gomez
starting at 8 p.m. It will feature six
animated shorts from the Detroit
artist. Two of the features, "Nigun"
and "Bus Stop" are previous winners
at the AAFF. "Nigun" is a dance
film telling the story of Adam and
Eve's exodus from Eden; "Bus Stop"
is a subjective ride through an urban

landscape escalating to apocalyptic
visions. Also featured:
"The Masque of the Red Death,"
an animated version of the Edgar All
Poe short story.
"Studies in Movement," a
compilation of drawn experiments in
motion.
"Isaac," the biblical tale of God's
testing of Abraham.
"The Enchanted Horse," a work-
in-progress based on the Tales of the
Arabian Nights.
In addition to participating in the
Made in Michigan festival, Gomez
will run a new all-level Animation
Workshop beginning September 26
at Performance Network.
The festival winds up Sunday
with a documentary seminar hosted
by George Corsetti featuring local
filmmakers. Corsetti, a local
filmmaker himself, documented the
struggle between a neighborhood and
General Motors in "Poletown
Lives."
The seminar begins at 1 p.m.
where Meridian filmmakers Linda
Chapnan and Pamela Leblanc will
discuss distribution and marketing
strategies for the grant-funded film.
They will also talk upon how to use
the festival circuit to reach a broader

audience.
At 2pm, the former editor ,of
"The Michigan Voice," Michael
Moore will discuss his strategies for
obtaining private funding for the
work-in-progress, "Roger and Me: ,A
Humorous Look at How General
Motors Destroyed Flint, Michiganor
The program continues at 3 prm.
with political activist Bill Brice
discussing low-budget. filmmaking.
This will be followed by a brief
workshop at 4 p,m. where Corsefi,
Moore, and Brice will present
participants with a hypothetical
project to accomplish.
Later that evening, a series,,of
documentaries will be presente,
starting with a reprisal of Meridian
Films' "Waiting Tables." Algo
featured is "Courage to Care," Sister
Carole Rittner's interviews wih
non-Semetic Europeans who aided
Jewish persons during World War II.
The festival concludes with
Michael Moore's presentation of
"Roger and Me: A Humorous Loo~d
at How General Motors Destroyed
Flint, Michigan." m
Admission is $3 nightly, and $12
for both Sunday's seminar and
documentary showings.

On location, Linda Chapman of Ann Arbor-based Meridan Films.

d

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3

Lopez-Ramos plays with Spanish flair

By Negin Mohtadi
Manuel Lopez-Ramos, world re-
nowned Argentine classical guitarist
and guest instructor of master classes
at the University, comes to Ann
Arbor once a year to visit an d
perform before his greater family,
the students.
Lopez-Ramos's ability to
captivate his students through the
warmth of his personality and the

love of his instrument is quite
unique. Through this interaction he
has created a strong bond with those
he has come into contact with. His
concert tonight at the Kerrytown
Concert House promises to be rich
in the sensitivity Lopez-Ramos feels
towards his instrument and his
audience.
Lopez-Ramos began his studies
at the age of ten, growing up in a
performance-oriented family.
Together they toured the country

performing in their own vaudeville-
type show. To this day Andres
Segovia remains his only idol. Early
on he followed Segovia's legendary
style to later develop his o w n
Spanish guitar style.
Since 1948 he has travelled
around the world, performing
throughout South America, Europe,
and the United States. His numerous
albums have been released under
Boston, RCA Victor, and currently
Angel record labels.

For his students, he has created
his own mesmerizing, eloquent
language of teaching. Based in
Mexico City, he is the founder of
the internationally known "Estudio
de Arte Guitarristico" where he
teaches students from all over the
world. These students are also
among the most prominent classical
guitar performers in the world.
Join the Daily
Artstaff.
Look for
announcements
about our
general meeting.

His methods of teaching and
performance convey music not only
in the realms of technical virtuosity,
but through feeling, emotion, and
artistic warmth. He attempts to give.
the audience an understanding of hoW
he feels about the music in hope thk
-they will leave his performance wim
a sense of fulfillment.
Helene Rottenburg-Jablonski,, 4,
former student of Lopez-Ramos sai
of the instructor, "He has that abilif
to show love through his muse;
both as a performer and a teacher." '
Lopez-Ramos also writes fot
television during his spare time
Some of his shows written for
children and situation comedies have'
been aired on Mexican television.
Manuel Lopez-Ramos will
performing this evening at t
Kerrytown -Concert lHouse. T?,
performance is scheduled to beginmt'
8 p.m. Tickets are $5 for studene
and $7 for non students.

I
I

IT'S

OUTRAGEOUS!
ALSO SUNDAY)

(IT'S

/

rI

/

'I
/N
N ,

HELP NEEDY
CHILDREN IN THE
ANN ARBOR AREA
q
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
7:30 P.M.
THE PENDLETON ROOM,
MICHIGAN UNION
A MASS MEETING FOR LIFE

4

4

ANW
U-M's all campus
yearbook mass
meeting this Sunday,
1 p.m., at the Student
Publications Building,
420 Maynard St. People

_..

H( .;{;t

K

WANTED

USHE

S

("I
fI

For Major Events Concerts
MASS MEETING E

needed for layout, writing,

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