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September 18, 1987 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-18

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4

Page 8 -The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 18, 1987
South Africa leans toward reforms

CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP)
A presidential commission
yesterday recommended the biggest
changes in South Africa's system of
legalized racial segregation since
apartheid laws went into effect in the
1950s.
Even if the government adopted
the proposals in full, however, most
of South Africa would remain ra-
cially segregated.
A leading anti-apartheid group, the
United Democratic Front, said Wed-
nesday that the advisory council pro-
posal was a "tragicomic farce" de-
signed to prolong white domination.
The recommendations were pre-
pared over three years by a 17-mem-

ber committee of the President's
Council, an appointed, 60-member
advisory body.
They would do the following:
-Replace the Group Areas Act,
which mandates racially segregated
neighborhoods, with legislation that
would allow localities to establish
multiracial areas, subject to veto by a
government-appointed provincial
administrator.
-Make possible voting for local
authorities on a non-racial basis in
the new mixed communities.
-Scrap the law that designates seg-
regated public amenities on a na-
tionwide basis, but allow local gov-
ernments and individuals to

discriminate.
-Eliminate all segregated business
districts.
The 250-page report will be de-
bated by the President's Council,
then presented to the Cabinet, which
is expected to announce its reaction
next week.
President Botha has frequently de-
clared his support for racially seg-
regated neighborhoods, hospitals and
schools as ways of preserving
distinct cultures.
But his appointment of the study
committee in 1984 was an indication
he was willing to accept some
change.
South Africa has 5 million

whites, who control the economy,
and 25.6 million blacks, who have
no vote in national affairs and who
are predominantly poor.
One official source, speaking on
condition of anonymity, said the
government has no objections to the
recommendation to abolish the 1953
Separate Amenities Act and allow
people to discriminate on an
individual and local basis.
It also may be willing to allow
local experiments in multiracial com-
munities, but is not prepared to re-
peal the entire Group Areas Act, en-
acted in 1950, the source indicated.
He said the government also has res-
ervations about different races voting
together in local elections.
There was no indication how the
government feels about eliminating
segregation on trains and buses, re-
moving national government control
of beaches, and dropping racial re-
strictions on use of farm, commercial
and religious property.

Adult & Youth Hockey Refs Needed for '87-'88 Season
Returning Refs
bring full equip. Sunday,"Set.27
New Refs 900 a'rn

-Associated Press
Judge Robert Bork emphasizes a point during his testimony before
the Senate Judiciary Committee, yesterday. The committee is in the
process of considering Bork's bid to become a Supreme Court Justice.

1

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444

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I

U.S., Russian
officials
agree
on arms ban
principles
(continued from Page 1)
State Department spokesperson said
at the windup of 9 and 1/2 hours of
talks between Shultz and She-
vardnadze. "The ministers, in es-
sence, have completed their business.
There will be a statement tomorrow
at a very early hour."
Word of the tentative agreement
came after Shultz and Shevardnadze
dramatically decided to extend their
talks on the treaty that could pave the
way to a superpower summit by
year's end.
An official, who demanded
anonymity, said earlier that experts
on both sides were trying to nail
down procedures for verifying the
destruction of all U.S. and Soviet
missiles with a range of 315 to
3,125 miles and the schedule for
dismantling them.
"They are very close to
agreement," he said at the time. He
said Shultz and Shevardnadze had
virtually settled a dispute over
missiles.

Students
Welcome

Information
Call: 971-8847

A MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTATION
CHEVYS
F A-ERIC

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ATTENTION!!!
ARCHITECTS, COMPOSERS, COSTUMERS, FILMMAKERS, LIGHT AND SET DESIGNERS,
POETS, VISUAL ARTISTS IN CERAMICS, FIBER, PAINTING, PHOTOGRAPHY, SCULPTURE AND
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OPPORTUNITY TO COLLABORATE WITH ADVANCED STUDENTS IN CHOREOGRAPHY FOR 2
HOURS CREDIT WITH FINAL PROJECTS PRESENTED IN PERFORMANCE, FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20 AND 21, 1987.
REGISTER FOR DANCE AND RELATED ARTS 530 IN THE DANCE DEPARTMENT,
SCHOOL OF MUSIC, DANCE BUILDING, MAIN CAMPUS.
MASS MEETING TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 AT 8 PM, IN THE DANCE BUILDING,
STUDIO A. FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT PROFESSOR GAY DELANGHE, 763-5460,
747-2288 OR 996-4759.

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