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September 14, 1987 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-14

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SPORTS

The Michigan Daily

Monday, September 14, 1987

Page 12

NFL ROUNDUP

44

Vikings,

Wilson rip

Lions in opener, 34-19

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - Wade
Wilson, whose three interceptions
put Minnesota in a 16-3 first-half
hole, threw a 73-yard touchdown
pass to Anthony Carter to spark a
21-point third quarter rally as the
Vikings overcame the Detroit Lions
34-19 in NFL action yesterday.
Carter was an even bigger culprit
than Wilson on two of the
interceptions, as perfect passes from
Wilson went right through his arms
and into the hands of Detroit
defenders.
But with Minnesota trailing 19-
x

10, Carter got behind Duane
Galloway, who had two of the
Lions' interceptions, and Wilson hit
Carter in stride. Wilson, starting in
place of the injured Tommy Kramer,
finished with 12 completions in 22
attempts for 248 yards and three
touchdowns.
Lions quarterback Chuck Long
was 24-for-38 for 195 yards and a
touchdown but was intercepted by
Neal Guggemos three plays after
Wilson's bomb to Carter.
Guggemos' 26-yard return set up
D.J. Dozier's 1-yard touchdown run,

which put
good with
quarter.

the Vikings ahead for
6:30 left in the third

Patriots 28, Dolphins 21
FOXBORO, Mass. - New
England scored twice within 50
seconds on Tony Collins' seven-yard
run and Ronnie Lippett's 20-yard
interception return to take a third-
quarter lead, and the Patriots beat the
Miami Dolphins 28-21 yesterday.
Steelers 30, 49ers 17
PITTSBURGH - Rookie
cornerback Delton Hall put

BUSINESS

Pittsburgh in the lead with a 50-yard
fumble recovery return and Mark
Malone overcame a nine-of-33
passing performance to throw a 2-
yard touchdown pass to Preston
Gothard as the Steelers stunned the
turnover-prone San Francisco 49ers
30-17 yesterday.
The Steelers, coming off their
first winless preseason in 22 years,
took a 20-3 lead by shutting down
the 49ers' running game and
pressuring 49ers quarterback Joe
Montana into throwing hurried
incompletions. Pittsburgh forced
five turnovers and converted three of
them into points.
Buccaneers 48, Falcons 10
TAMPA, Fla. - Steve DeBerg
passed for 333 yards and a team-
record five touchdowns yesterday,
leading Tampa Bay to a 48-10
victory over the Atlanta Falcons in
the Buccaneers' debut under Coach
Ray Perkins.
DeBerg, who threw seven
interceptions in the Bucs season
opener a year ago, completed 24 of
34 passes as Tampa Bay set club
records for points scored and largest
margin of victory in the franchise's
12-year history.
The Tampa Bay offense, which

f''

P RE-MED
ORIENTATION
MEETING

See CHIEFS, Page

13

-Associated Press
Minnesota running back D.J. Dozier tries for a first down against Detroit
in NFL action yesterday.

1NFORMATION & REGISTRATION
COURSE REQUIREMENTS, ADMISSIONS, PREPARATION
FOR MED SCHOOL, VISIT WITH UM MEDICAL STUDENTS.
THURSDAY, SEPT.17
7 P.M.
ROOM 170, DENNISON
OW PRE-PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
A UNIT OF STUDENT SERVICES

/. -

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Michigan Daily
SPORTS
763-0376
Have you
Considered
Navy ROTC?

C.e, Bd in.

540 E. Liberty
(across from the Mich. Theater)
761-4539

1220 S. University
(across from Village Corner)
747-9070

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Spn...lM p on Cbkg o e,,

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Macintosh'personal computers have
been getting quite an education over the
past few years. Fm faculty members
and administrators at colleges and uni-
versities worldwide.
And based in no small part on what
we've learned in higher education, we
proudly introduce two new classes of
higher'technology:
The Macintosh SE.
And the Macintosh II.
The SE is a direct descendant of the
Macintosh Plus-the computer that's
performing brilliantly in school even as
we speak.
Like all Macintoshes both larger and
smaller, it's extremely simple to learn.

point-and-click commands and pull-
down menus.
So once you've learned the basics,
you can concentrate on learning all kinds
of other things. Or teaching them, for
that matter.
And like the Macintosh Plus, the SE
comes standard with a 32-bit Motorola
68000 microprocessor and a full mega-
byte of internal memory expandable to
4 megabytes.
But since SE is short for "System Ex-
pansion,'you can a lot further
You get your choice of either two
internal 800K disk drives or one 800K
drive plus an internal 20-megabyte
SCSI hard disk So you can store tremen-

old floppy disk shuffle.
You also get a choice of keyboards.
Either a Macintosh Plus-li' m figuration,
or one complete with function keys for
more-specialized applications.
For an even brighter future, the SE
has its very own expansion slot. So you
can add cards that let you do everything
from tie into the campus computer net-
work to work with data created on
MS-DOS computers.
Now between the Macintosh Plus
and the Macintosh SE, most of the fac-
ulty and administration will find all
the power and flexibility they may ever
need-a condition technically known
as "happiness"

mance personal compute; we present
the Macintosh ll. The Open Macintosh.
It's the fastest Macintosh yet. With an
even more advanced 32-bit Motorola
68020 microprocessor.As well as a 68881
floating point processor that gives you
even faster processing speeds for heavy
duty number crunching. (Yes, fans,the II
has the capacity to run Unix:)
You can expand its standard 1 mega-

byte of memory up to 8 megabytes on
the motherboard, and up to a chilling 15
gigabytes of memory throu ghthe slots.
You can add an interna 20, 40 or
80-megabyte hard disk. Choose from two
keyboards-one with and one without
function keys.'Ivo Apple monitors-
12"B&Wor 13"color. Or other third party
high resolution, large screen monitors.-
And the Macintosh II has 6 expansion
slots. So its open for just about anything
the future may hold.
Like an Ethernet interface card for
network connections. A card for running
MS-DOS software. An IEEE interface card
to monitor and control laboratory instru-
ments. Even an enhanced color graphics

Yet powerful as it is, the Macintosh II
hasn't forgotten its first name.
It can still run most advanced Mac-
intosh business and academic software.
And it's still supported by all those
great programs that made Macintosh a
hit on campus. For example, Kinko's
Academic Courseware Exchange, Apple's
faculty journal, Whedsfor/heMi and
academic conferences.
So if your department is actively re-
cruiting computers, we su ggestthat you
review the qualifications ofany or
the Macintoshes.
Because our family is ready to make
a huge contribution to'the college
of your choice.

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