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September 14, 1987 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-14

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The Michigan Daily-Monday, September 14, 1987- Page 5

'U' unveils drawings for
new computer center
Will meet goal of 1500 terminals

By RYAN TUTAK
The University unveiled drawings
Friday of a computer center under
construction in the courtyard
between Angell and Mason Halls.
The facility will increase the number

million center should be completed
in time for next fall, according to
Jack Janveja, the architectural
coordinator of the center.
The center's architecture features a
ceiling with more than 140

The center is expected to house as many as 370
computers, 80 of which will be stationed in four
classrooms used for computer courses..-.

accessibility.
The unused courtyard was selected
as the site of the computer center
because of limited construction space
on campus and the need for "a good
significant-size general-access
facility in the LSA area," Halloway
said.
Masten said about 1000
computers are in operation on
campus now, and she expects 150
more to be in operation before the
center is completed. The center's
completion will boost the total to
the University's goal of1500.
Halloway said he does not expect
the construction of the center to
interfere with classes because the
land has already been excavated and
the groundwork for the cement
foundation of the center should be
laid within two weeks. Any further
construction, such as the fabrication
of the center's steel framework, will
continue off-campus until the winter
term of classes is over, he said.

of open campus terminals by almost
25 percent when it is completed in
September 1989.
The center is expected to house as
many as 370 computers, 80 of
which will be stationed in four
classrooms used for computer
courses, according to Deborah
Masten, assistant director at the
Computing Center for Public
Facility.
The classrooms in the $2.675

skylights. "It's an exciting concept,"
said Henry Holloway, manager of
space and equipment for the College
of Literature, Science and the Arts.
TWO depictions of the center are
displayed on a window in the
corridor between Angell and Mason
Halls.
Halloway said the corridor will be
widened and a lounge will be added
to decongest student traffic. A ramp
will be built for handicap

-Associated Press
Hispanic Heritage Celebrated
President Reagan, with Vice President George Bush and Katherine Ortega, Treasurer of the United
States, at his side, take part Friday in the White House Rose Garden, at a National Hispanic Heritage
Week Ceremony.

Residence hall staffers get free Mac use, teach computing

By KENNETH DINTZER
In the first program of its kind anywhere, more than
300 Apple Macintoshes have been loaned to residence
hall staff members with the hope that computer
proficiency will "trickle down" to students.
According to Marvin Parnes, assistant director of
Resident Education, the 319 computers were lent free
of charge to resident advisors and resident directors
when they were replaced at campus computer clusters.
PARNES said that once staff members learn how
to use the Macintoshes, they can help students use the
computers that are available in all residence halls. "The

pilot program (conducted in 1985) showed a trickle
down effect with clear impact on residence hall
members," he said. "They began using the clusters
more."
The pilot program also increased communication
among staff members. All the computers are connected
to the Michigan Terminal System, which allows users
to send messages, hold computer conferences, and
access the Campus Information Center. Parnes said
RAs and RDs used the system "more than I ever
thought they would."
When information needs to be distributed it can be

put on the computer in minutes, saving hours of phone
calling. Parnes said that the better, faster
communication will help the advisors address
problems, whether personal or security related, but the
main goal of the program remains educational.
Mary Simoni, coordinator for Computer Education.
said the residence halls feel obliged to teach students to
use word processors and statistics programs.
"HOUSING has many responsibilities besides
making sure people are sheltered and fed, including
teaching them things they may not learn in a
classroom," she said.

Each advisor goes through two three-hour classes
learning to use Microsoft Word and the features of the
MTS system, with more lessons available throughout
the year.
Robert Dunne, who's -in charge of training staff
members in East Quad, said most advisors have
experience working with computers but "some people
have absolutely zero, and some people are a little scared
of them... They will really benefit."
STAFF members sign contracts before they receiye
their Macintoshes, making them responsible for the
computer during the year.

Police Notes

Safewalk adds weekend walks

Assault
Ann Arbor Police a r e
investigating the assault of an Ann
Arbor woman early Saturday
morning as she was entering her
residence in the 1000 block of Olivia
Street, according to Lieutenant G.
Miller. The woman told police the
suspect appered from behind some
bushes, grabl~d her shoulder, fondled
her, and attempted to kiss her. The
woman said she freed herself from
the man's grasp after whiph he ran
off.
Fake gun
The police are also investigating
an incident Friday night when a
fifteen year-old juvenile brandished
an Uzi look-alike gun at a fraternity
party after he and two companions
were barred from entering the door at
1315 Hill Street. The youth was
actually carrying a BB gun and was
taken to the Washtenaw County
Juvenile Detention Center after
being arrested. -by Steve Blonder

(Continued from Page 1)
Roberto Frisancho, an
engineering junior, said he has been
a Safewalk volunteer for the past
two years.
"It's a good feeling to walk
people home. I like helping people,"
Frisancho said. Also, he said he was
impressed by the dedication of the
volunteers.
Leo Heatley, director of
University Safety, said Safewalk

improves campus safety because it
frees security officers to do other
things while volunteers walk people
home. Before Safewalk began,
students walking late at night would
call for a security officer escort,
Heatley said.
"It's a really positive thing tc
have students helping students. It's
outstanding," he said.
H E A T L E Y said campus
security assigns one or two security

officers to help coordinate Safewalk.
Vern Baisden, a public safety
officer, said he has been a liason
between Safewalk and the safety
department for the past year.
"It's a joint coordinating effort.
Everything went smoothly last year,
and we're expecting a lot of
requests," he said.

TUESDAYLUNCH FORUM
at the
INTERNATIONAL CENTER - 603 E. MADISON
September 15: "Snapshots & Reflections, Study In West Africa"
Speaker: Jennifer Sharpe, Residence Director of
Emanuel Co-Op, French House at Oxford Housing and
international student from Zimbabwe

Sponsored by:
The Ecumenical Campus Center
Aand the International Center

Lunch Available:
$1.00 (students)
$1.50 (others)

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For More Info.
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