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December 11, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Soviets
forbid
activists'
meeting

MOSCOW (AP) - Activists
who organized a human rights sem-
inar to test the new Soviet "open-
ness" got official warnings yesterday
that it was illegal and found the
meeting hall they had rented closed
for a "sanitary day."
Sponsors of the seminar said
many foreign guests could not get
visas.
By contrast, Pushkin Square and
the House of Union were filled by
official groups holding approved
rallies on International Human

Rights Day.
Alexander Rubchenko, whose un-
official organization tries to build
trust between the United States and
Soviet Union, said about 20 police
officers detained him and seven other
members for several hours when they
left an apartment for Pushkin Square
to hold their own demonstration.
The unofficial seminar came the
day after Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev defended Soviet human rights
policies in a talk with U.S. journal-
ists in Washington.

Four members of the U.S. House
of representatives and a Czech dis-
sident received permission to travel
to Moscow for the seminar sponsored
by Press Club Glasnost, named for
Gorbachev's policy of greater open-
ness in Soviet society.
Lef Timofeyev, the organizer of
the seminar, said more foreign guests
had been expected from the United
States, Poland and West Germany,
but they had been refused Soviet
visas.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, December 11, 1987- Page 5
A Dickens of A Sale
(I) All Fall
0 C.P. Shades
Z $29.95
Uj Values to $76.00
Happy Holidays To All!
W on East Liberty between 4th & 5th
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REAR ENDS'

Protesters confront 'U' and

cit

(Contnuedfrom Page 1)
questions to Director of Public
Safety Leo Heatley about Marcuse's;
arrest, chanting, "Public safety's not
safe lately," while carrying signs
proclaiming, "Fire Patrick," and "say
no to low blows."
Heatley, addressing the protesters
outside the Department of Public
Safety, would not comment on Mar-
cuse's charges, saying, "It's pending

in court."
The rally continued at City Attor-
ney Bruce Laidlaw's City Hall office.
Laidlaw said he would review the
case once more during the next week,
because he said he "didn't recall" see-
ing testimony from protesters. But
the police report does include three
students' testimony.
After leaving City Hall, the
protesters went to County Prosecutor

Students help homeless

William Delhey's office in an at-
tempt to open an investigation for
conspiracy. Delhey was unavailable,
and the students were told that a case
involving Ann Arbor police must be
investigated by state officials.
Two weeks ago, about 30 student
protesters pushed past Heatley at the
Student Activities Building to gain
access to a hallway that led to CIA
interviews.
In the police report, Heatley testi-
fied to Det. Richard Kinsey that he
saw Marcuse grab Ann Arbor Police
Det. Douglas Barbour, who was
standing behind Heatley in the hall-
)k ATARI'
COMMODORE
IBM COMPATIBLE
" Hardware
* Software
" Supplies
" Service

y officials
way, and knee him in the back.
After protesters gained access to
another hallway, Marcuse said he was
kicked in the groin by Patrick. But in
the report, Patrick said Marcuse
kneed Assistant Director of Public
Safety Robert Pifer in the back, and
when Marcuse turned toward him, he
kicked Marcuse in self-defense.
Pifer's statement agrees, but Pifer
said he did not see his assailant or
Patrick's action.
- Daily Staffers Andrew Mills
and David Schwartz filed reports for
this story.

CLASSIFIED ADSI Call 764-0557

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(Continued from Page 3)
leased from the federal government
through the Freedom of Information
Act.
"It's a disgrace that as the wealth-
iest, most advanced country in the
world, people are starving," Klein
said.
Project Warmth, a group started
in November by two students, raised

over $1,000 through campus bucket
drives last month. With the money,
members bought wool socks, hats,
and gloves to send to a shelter for
the homeless in Detroit and Ann
Arbor.
"I was ignored when I started
holding the bucket outside," said
LSA junior David Cracchiolo,
founder of Project Warmth.

'
', L

House to vote on bill

(Continued from Page 1)
rent control, but the anti-rent control
legislation would effect both Detroit
and Ann Arbor. Detroit, with 12,000
signatures, has a rent control pro-
posal on the ballot for August, and
Reason No. 17 for
living in a house
or condominium your
parents own:
When you own the space, you
can change and develop it-you
know you'llbe there for several
years, and the improvements
belong to you, not to the landlord.
Condos and houses are
going fast-Call Today!
Free Brochure from:
The Michigan Group, Inc.
2350 Washtenaw, AA 48104
or call Bob Hefner
(313) 662-3958

Ann Arbor already has more than
5,000 signatures - more than re-
quired an initiative to go to the vot-
ers.

STATE STRET
663-0090
334 1/2 So. State St. Ann Arbor, Mi

-The Associated
tributed to this report.

Press con-

E

eate
Celebrate
CetIpat 0e

46ae a4'
111111111

Iii

00
Good Luck with
Your Examinations!
See You in January

Happy
Hoi'days
oFrom Domino's Pizza

uA

I

,ov

CANDLES AND MENORAHS
ON SALE AT HILLEL 339 E. LIBERTY
FOR CHANUKAH 663-3336
CHANUKAH
1st NIGHT

;

DEC. 15

Iliwi

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North Campus
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pays
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for your textbooks
whether used
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or not!
Store Hours:
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Friday 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

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