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December 04, 1987 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ARTS
Friday, December 4, 1987

The Michigan Daily

Page 9

Ark

to

By Todd Shanker
A variety of Ann Arbor's most prolific
performers will be donating their talents at a
benefit concert for the homeless at 8 p.m., Sun-
day night at the Ark. All proceeds will go to Ann
Arbor's Day Drop-In Shelter, which has been
temporarily relocated in the old Michigan Na-
tional Bank building on South Ashley.
Some of the bountiful talent that will be vol-
unteering their time and effort to this worthy
cause include the dynamic jazz duo of Ozer and
Moore, folk artists Mustard's Retreat, masterful
jazz/ragtime pianist James Dapogny, and the
dramatic performances of the effervescent Elise
Bryant.
Stephanie Ozer (vocalist) and pianist Kathleen
Moore recently won the Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity jazz competition and play everything
from jazz and fun '40s standards to invigorating
original material.
James Dapogny, a professor in the University
Music school, is a virtuoso pianist who is well
known for his mastery of the thrilling
jazz/ragtime of all-time great Jellyroll Morton.
He has also published a book on this great per-
former.
Formerly of the socially/politically conscious
Common Ground Theatre, Elise Bryant will

stage I
probably act and read scenes from her one-woman
show currently in the works. And topping of the
entertainment, folk duo Mustard's Retreat will
also lend their hands to the homeless as they play
tunes from their recently released third album.
In addition, Senator Lana Pollack will host
the event. Pollack has gained a longstanding rep-
utation as an ardent supporter of the Arts, as well
as an outspoken leader in the struggle to help the
homeless. "This is not just a problem in our
own backyard," she says. "It's a national problem
that needs attention not only from local govern-
ment but also the federal government. The re-
sponse needs to be strong on all levels."
Last year the Day Drop-In program helped 857
homeless people, and this year the cries for help
are likely to be just as numerous. Cathy Zick,
coordinator of the program, says the Day Drop-In
shelter is unique because "it searches for a per-
manent solution to the problem of the home-
less."
The shelter utilizes three basic components to
help homeless people out of their squalid envi-
ronments, depression, and unemployment. There
is the informal drop-in component, whereby the
shelter provides a place for the homeless to be re-
energized with care and encouragement offered by
trained counselors as well as other homeless
people. The shelter also provides them with food,

enefit
shelter, and a place to sleep on weekends.
Next, there is the advocacy service compo-
nent. This offers guests personal assistance in
obtaining employment, housing, and public
health services, while working with each
individual as they struggle to gain independence
and stability. Emergency needs such as access to
a phone, a bus ticket, a pair of shoes, are taken
care of under this component. In addition, on-
sight medical service is administered twice a
week by trained professionals.
Lastly, there is the shelter's formal program-
ming component. Trained staff work with the
guests on long term goals to aid their assimila-
tion back into society. For example, classes are
offered in a group setting that explore such topics
as substance abuse therapy, literacy, job training,
and permanent housing. These three components
work synergistically to help permanently allevi-
ate the intolerable conditions of life lived on the
streets.
Sunday's benefit concert promises to be a very
special evening of visual and aural entertainment.
It will also be a chance for all of us to join in the
holiday spirit and help those less fortunate than
ourselves.
Tickets will be available Sunday night at the
Ark's door for $10, or on an ability-to-pay slid-
ing scale.

)et Elise Bryant will be among the several area artists performing a
nefit concert for the homeless at the Ark Sunday night.

- - --------

Java and Jazz offers an exciting Holl

y Brian Bonet
This Sunday, Eclipse's Java and
:z special returns for one last time
fore the holidays, and will feature
iowned baritone saxophonist Mar-
"Doc" Holladay and his Trio.
Holladay, who resides next door
Ypsilanti, has blown with the
st. He has played big band orches-
i style with Stan Kenton, Woody
-rman, Quincy Jones, Duke Pear-
n, and was a member of the Duke
ilington Alumni Orchestra.
This is just a partial list, how-
ier. His versatile talents have en-
)mpassed all areas of the music.
lusicians such as Dizzy Gillespie,
harles Mingus, Ella Fitzgerald,
illy Eckstine, Herbie Hancock, and
ill Evans have utilized Holladay
nd his horn for numerous live
hows and recordings.
As the director of jazz studies at
)akland University in Rochester,
Michigan, the recipient of a Ph.D.
n Ethnomusicology at Wesleyan
Jniversity, and graduate student at
(ale, Holladay is a well-schooled
authority on the music's roots and
nasters. This, coupled with his ver-
;atile, well respected musicianship
makes him a contributor as well as a
scholar of what he dubs "the indige-
nous music of the United States."
So with this knowledge and
experience, is there one artist Holla-
day has enjoyed or admired playing
with the most?

"Everybody has a unique voice.
The uniqueness of that voice is im-
portant. Because I know- Dizzy
(Gillespie), it would be easy for me
to -name Dizzy as the most impor-
tant, most influential, most every-
thing person in jazz. But that
wouldn't be fair. I know his be-
liefs..."
And personal beliefs are impor-
tant to Holladay where jazz is con-
cerned. "You can't define jazz," he
says. "Jazz is a very personal thing."
"If I was to say 'this guy has in-
fluenced my playing more than any-
one' I'd have to say Ben Webster.
But I didn't really know him. I'd
love to play like him."
But is jazz abandoning its roots,
or is jazz in the ear of the beholder?
Should interpretations of Cyndi
Lauper and Scritti Polliti pop songs
be coming out of Miles Davis' leg-
endary trumpet? And what about this
monster called Sting?
"I don't think it has totally aban-
doned its roots," says Holladay. "It's
strayed away from its roots, but I
wouldn't say what you're hearing
today ain't jazz."
Holladay likens the music to the
nurturing of a child. "Jazz was born
to an African mother and the child
)kATARI
COMMODORE
IBM COMPATIBLE
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had certain European gen
father. It was first in a to
community and moved on
outside influences," he sa'
So can an artist survi
traditional jazz?
"It depends what you
survive," responds Hollac
ing. "They're not going
money playing jazz. It h
some element of rock 'n
it."
Because of his positioi
Holladay has been able1
sonal motivations aheadc
ones. "There are those p
yours truly, who say 'tha
I ain't gonna do it."'
It is these people who
able to give young musi
up in the industry and
Holladay relishes his
amongst this contingent.
had to compromise anyth
play is me. I'm not co
people are going to say'(
Isn't what he's playing v
ME _mo

aday treat
es from its I'm going to play my music. Just
tally Black like Duke Ellington."
to pick up Holladay has an ideal notion tW
ys. create what he calls "Symphony S
ve playing cieties" whose structural framew ;k
would resemble classical symphony
u mean by orchestras.
day, laugh- The Doc Holladay Trio also fer
to get the tures two promising young m
ias to have cians, Marion Hayden on bass
' roll about drummer Randy Gillespie, who
cently played in town with Toi
n, however, Flanagan.
to put per- THE DOC HOLLADAY
of financial will be performing two sets
)eople, like Sunday at the Michigan Unionr
t's not me. room (located on the ground floor
part of Eclipse's Java and Jazz see;
).have been Sets are at 5 and 6 p.m., wor-,
cians a leg is at 4:30 p.m.
professor
position
S"I haven't
ing. What I
ncerned if
XOO-AHH!

wonderful...
U .

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'Doc' Holladay has a unique insight into the realm of jazz. He is a
scholar of and a premiere contributor to the music.

Records

Friday
Tuna Salad &
Cup of Bay Chowde-
served
11:30-2:30
3385S. State St.

Warlock
Triumph and Agony
Mercury Records
It's not unusual for a band to have
a beautiful woman on their cover,
and it's not unusual for bands to have
good looking women in them. Case
in point: Warlock's lead singer Doro
Pensch, who is quite good looking,
is all over the cover of her band's
latest album. Sad to say, Pensch's
good looks aren't enough to save this
album. Maybe the record company
executives are hoping albums will
sell merely on the strength of their
covers. It works, up to a point, but

eventually someone will listen to the
album and discover they have been
duped.
Doro Pensch is from Germany,
and I hope for her sake she doesn't
understand much English. The lyrics
on this album are a compilation of
every bad cliche ever to appear in a
heavy metal song. No credits are
given on the album for whoever
perpetrated this crime upon our ears,
but that's probably because whoever
wrote them didn't want anyone to
know they did it.
The songs are musically passable;
Pensch has recruited an able group of
musicians, but if I were them I

wouldn't let my name be used in
conjunction with this material.
Avoid this album.
-Chuck Skarsaune

CLIP GC JAZZ

J/1v

A4

and J14ZZ

sunday, december 6
THE DOC HO L L IDAY TRIO
5:00 pm-the TAP room
(next to the MUG)
Michigan Union-ground floor
FREE!!!

1 ~COOKIES1
NIGHT OWLS TAKE A STUDY BREAK! 1
tBUY 2 COOKIES, GET 1 F=RE!
1 I
1 I
1 Open till11 p.m. daily COUPON MUST BE A
I 715 N. University PRESENTED WITH PURCHASE
I 1227 S. University OFFER VALID THROUGH I
I 761-CHIP DECEMBER 22,1987 1
S - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

M..

0"

Sun.,
Dec. 6

The University of Michigan
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Campus Chamber Orchestra
Yves Cohen, conductor
Saint-Saens: Carnival of the Animals
Raval: Pavanne for a Dead Princess
Schubert: Symphony No. 5

CONSULTANTS TO INTERNATIONAL FIRMS
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