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December 02, 1987 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-12-02

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Page 2 -The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, December 2, 1987

Court
rejects
moment
of s11ence
In schools
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Supreme Court yesterday refused to
let New Jersey provide moments of
silence for public school students,
but gave no hint whether similar
laws in other states impermissibly
promote school prayer.
The court ruled unanimously that
the New Jersey legislators w h o
sought to press the controversy in
court no longer have the proper legal
standing.
The ruling therefore said nothing
about the constitutionality of a 1982
New Jersey law that said students
may use the daily silent moments
"for quiet and private contemplation
or introspection." About half the
states have similar laws.
A federal appeals court struck
down the New Jersey law, ruling
that it violated the constitutionally
required separation of church and
state.
The issue has always been politi-
cally charged. And it is likely that a
case testing the validity ofanother
state's moment-of-silence law will
reach the high court.
"The constitutional issue is still a
live question," said Steven McDow-
ejl of the Milwaukee-based Catholic
League for Religious and Civil
Rights, which had urged the court to
uphold the New Jersey law.
"I expect that some other state's
law will be reviewed by the high
court. With a new justice joining the
court, I believe we will see that law
being upheld."

-Associated Press
Crack attack
Detroit police narcotics officers conduct a raid yesterday as part of Mayor Coleman Young's war against
crack cocaine trafficking.
Man charged inWIVIU murder
to undergo psychiatric exams

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
U.S. blames Haitian army for
terrorizing, dissolving elections
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - U.S. observers yesterday blamed the ar-
my for the terror campaign that thwarted elections, and some leading
presidential candidates vowed to boycott any balloting supervised by the
military-led junta.
Calls increased for multinational intervention to oversee national elec-
tions, which the government claims it still intends to hold before a Feb.
7 deadline.
Most Haitians distrust the government, which dissolved the au-
tonomous Provisional Electoral Council Sunday after voter-targeted vio-
lence forced it to call off the nation's first free elections in 30 years.
Meanwhile, the streets of this impoverished capital of one million be-
gan to show signs of life yesterday, although schools and some busi-
nesses stayed closed.
Talks with Cuban inmates
progress, hostages still held
C~an C1
ATLANTA - Negotiators for 1,110 Cuban inmates holding hostages
at a federal prison reached "substantial agreement" with government
representatives yesterday on a number of issues, a government spokesper-
son said.
A one-hour negotiating session was "considerably more encouraging
than others we have had over the last few days," the department said in a
statement.
The inmate leaders took the proposals back to the detainees, who are
fighting plans to deport them back to Cuba, and another bargaining ses-
sion was scheduled for later, the department said.
Patrick Korten, deputy director of public affairs for the U.S. Justice
Department, said the "very businesslike" bargains with four inmate repre-
sentatives seemed to indicate that the negotiations were losing ground.
Senate discusses drug charges
LANSING - Worried Senate leaders huddled behind closed doors
yesterday with a colleague who pleaded guilty to drug charges the day
before, but agreed to delay any action while Michigan's senior senator
decides his next step.
Sen. Basil Brown (D-Highland Park), who faces up to 20 years in
prison after pleading guilty to delivery of cocaine and marijuana, has
agreed to skip Senate session for the rest of this week, said Senate
Majority Leader John Engler (R-Mount Pleasant), and Minority Leader
Arthur Miller (D-Warren).
Sen. Brown is expected to decide what action to take after meeting
with his attorneys, family and majority Republicans in the Senate.
NASA awards space contracts
WASHINGTON - NASA named four companies yesterday as win-
ners of billions of dollars in contracts for construction of a space station,
the next major site for U.S. exploration and use of space.
The contracts may eventually be valued at $6.5 billion and could pro-
vide about 12,000 jobs, officials said.
The contractors selected for the space station hardware design and de-
velopment included Boeing Aerospace of Huntsville, Ala.; McDonnell
Douglas Astronautics Co. of Huntington Beach, Calif, and Houston; and
General Electric Co., Astro-Space Division, Valley Forge, Pa.
"The best minds in the nation went to work on this project and all of
the proposals we received were outstanding," said James Fletcher, the ad-
ministrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
EXTRAS

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KALAMAZOO (AP) - A man
charged in the slaying of a Western
Michigan University student was
ordered by a district judge yesterday
to undergo psychiatric evaluation.
Judge James Coyle of the 9th
District Court sent Timothy Berg-
man to the State Forensic Center in
Ypsilanti for testing that will de-
termine whether Bergman is fit to
stand trial.
"He (Bergman) will be evaluated
for competency and criminal respon-
sibility," said David Westol, a Ka-

lamazoo County assistant prose-
cutor.
Bergman is accused of the rape
and strangulation of 18-year-old Julie
Cunningham, a Western Michigan
first-year student. She was killed
Nov. 14 and her body was found the
next day at the university's track.
Bergman was arrested Nov. 24
and arraigned the next day.
The psychiatric testing forced

Bergman's preliminary hearing to be
postponed from tomorrow to Feb.
11, 1988, said Charlene Goodpaster,
a 9th District Court official.
The results of Bergman's psychi-
atric tests should be known at that
time, she added.
Meanwhile, two people who
knew Bergman told the Kalamazoo
Gazette that Michigan's correctional
and mental health systems are partly
to blame if he is convicted.

HEALTH & FITNESS
What's
(4 Hap pe ning
Recreational Sports
. SKI WAXING CLINIC
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3,1987
7pm -9 pm NORTH CAMPUS RECREATION BUILDING
Call 764-3967 for registration information
. USER PASSES AND LOCKERS FOR FALL
TERM ONLY EXPIRE DECEMBER 22, 1987
RENEW NOW!
CCRB OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI.8:30am -8:00pm
m,

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Chinese ambassador
speaks on U.S. trade

I

(Continued from Page 1)
security (against the U.S.S.R.).
They are based upon real political
and economic reasons."
Han cited the recent opening of a
Kentucky Fried Chicken in
downtown Beijing that seats 500 as
an example of American investment

FULL PRIVILEGE
ADULT NAUTILUS
CLUB MEMBERSHIP
ONLY $75.00 DOWN AND
$20.00 A MONTH.
ANN ARBOR 'Y'"
350 S. FIFTH AVE.
663-0536

there. Han said he hadn't eaten there
yet, but heard that the prices were
"very reasonable."
Han, who has been the ambas-
sador to America since 1985, first
served at the Chinese Liaison Office
in Washington when relations were
first established in 1972. He served
there until 1978 when he returned to
China to serve as Vice-Foreign
Minister.
As a youth, Han took an active
part in the Communist revolution.
He fought the Japanese and Chinese
Nationalist forces in Mao Tse-
Tung's 8th Route Aimy. He became
active in Chinese foreign policy
when he attended the Chinese
Mission to Moscow in the 1960s
during China's break-off with
U.S.S.R.
Political Science Prof. Leonard
Woodcock, the first American
ambassador to the People's Republic
of China following the Shanghai
Communique and full normalization
of relations in 1978, introduced
Ambassador Han. Woodcock first
met Han in China during the late
1970s, and the two became friends.
Han is currently a guest of the
University and the Center for
Chinese Studies. He has toured the
University, met with the faculty of
the Center for Chinese Studies and
talked with students.
CLASSIFIED ADS;
Call 764-0557

Vault Opening in Detroit
upstages Geraldo Rivera
DETROIT - At least they didn't make a televison show out of it.
Jack Bates and John Caswell of the Redford Safe and Lock Co. in
November cracked open a half-ton safe, circa early 1900s, that carpenters
discovered at Orchestra Hall.
Inside the safe was another safe. Inside that was a safety deposit box
key, a 1956 penny and a roll of theatre tickets, said Jeff Montgomery,
Orchestra Hall spokesperson.
"We didn't have grand illusions, but at least we have a lucky penny
and a key to the future," Montgomery said.
Earlier, Montgomery joked that he hoped the safe contained $7.5
million to cover the remainder of Orchestra Hall's $12 million capital
improvement fund drive.
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.

1

01~ he Mihigan BaI

Vol. XCVIII - No. 58
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$25 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term: $13 in
Ann Arbor; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and subscribes
to the Los Angeles Times Syndicate and the National Student News Ser-
Vice.

screenplay by based on the film by Music by

CHARLES GRIFFITH

ROGER CORMAN
0?

Alan Menken

c /
Mendelssohn
Theater
4 ~

Book and Lyrics by
Howard Ashman

ASSISTANT EDITORS
Gale Research Company, a major
publisher of reference books for
libraries worldwide, is seeking
candidates for editorial positions to
do research and writing for our
books. Bachelor's degree in English,
Language or Humanities is highly
preferred; college course work and
interest in literature of many peri-
ods is required. These are entry
level positions that offer advance-
ment opportunities. Our benefit
package includes flexible working
hours; medical, dental, optical and
prescription drug insurance; tuition
assistance; and paid time off be-
tween Christmas and New Year's.
If interested, please send resume,

>L7- i A, , <
:q- -7
A UAC/SOPH SHOW
'+ PRODUCTION .<

Editor in Chiel..............................................ROB EARLE
ManagingEditor.......... ....AMY MINDELL
News Editor ................................PHILIP I. LEVY
City Editor..............................................MELISSA BIRKS
Features Editor.......................................MARTIN FRANK
University Editor............KERY MURAKAMI
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Francis Arenson,
Vicki Bauer, Eve Becker, Katherine Beitner, Steve
Blonder, Keith Brand, Jim Bray, Dov Cohen,
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Lustig, Alyssa Lustigman, Tom MacKinnon, Andrew
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Miller, Jeffrey Rutherford, Steve Semenuk, Tony
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BETH FERTIG
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Film............................JOHN SHEA
Theatre..........................JENNIFER KOHN
ARTS STAFF: V.J. Beauchamp, Scott Collins, Robert
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. ANDI SCHREIBER
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ALAN PAUL
CARTOONISTS: Aaron Chassy, Fred Zinn.
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