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November 30, 1987 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-11-30

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The Michigan Daily-Monday, November 30, 1987- Page 3

Prof. works to repair
U.S.-Japan war wounds

By VICKI BAUER
For the last four years Yuzuru Takeshita, a professor
of health behavior in the University's School of Public
Health, has worked to "heal the wounds" of World War
II between the United States and Japan. Last August,
he arranged a memorial service in Bly, Ore., for a
tragedy that occurred more than forty years ago.
In May 1945, five children and a pregnant woman
picnicing in Bly were killed by an exploding Japanese-
made balloon bomb. The balloon bomb, launched by
Japanese school children, travelled across the Pacific
Ocean by jet streams. The six were the only World War
II victims to die on the U.S. continent, said Takeshita.
He said the Japanese children were instructed by
their teacher to make and launch 9,000 rice paper
balloon bombs. Only 1,000 balloon bombs arrived in
the United States; three landed in Michigan and caused
a forest fire in the Upper Peninsula and damage in
Farmington and Grand Rapids.
Takeshita became interested in the balloon bombs as
a teenager when he was imprisoned for four years in a
relocation camp in Northern California. Ironically, the
camp in which Takeshita was imprisoned was only 60
miles from Bly.
Takeshita's interest in the balloon bombs was
rekindled four years ago after seeing a balloon bomb on
exhibit at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. Next
to the exhibit were the names of the victims.
"To me six lives are six lives. When I learned the
identity of them, it hit me hard," Takeshita said.
"People are always talking about starting peace, yet
we cannot forget the last war," Takeshita continued. "In
the Japanese context, the last war was World War II. If
we really want peace, we have to heal the wounds that
happened 40 years ago."
Through a series of coincidences and four years of
investigative work, Takeshita tracked down the now
adult Japanese school children and their 74-year-old
teacher responsible for the balloon bombs as well as
the relatives of the victims in Oregon.
Takeshita presented the names of the survivors to
the teacher and her former students and asked them to
pray and send them their condolences.
A few months later, Takeshita received a request
from teacher in Japan to deliver a gift to the survivors
in Oregon. The teacher and the students made 1,000
paper cranes, Japanese oragami symbolic of peace and
healing.
Takeshita and his family represented the Japanese

'If we really want peace, we have to
heal the wounds that happened 40 years
ago.'
- Health Behavior Prof.
Yuzuru Takeshita
teacher and her students at the memorial service.
Takeshita chose the month of August for the
memorial because it is the the anniversary of the end of
World War II as well as the anniversary of the atomic
bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Takeshita's 10-year-old daughter Junko presented the
paper cranes to the three survivors and relatives of the
victims.
"They were very touched by the gesture," Takeshita
said. "Very few people in the town even remembered
the incident. We were touched how graciously they
accepted the gesture."
Through his efforts, Takeshita also wants to remind
people of the past injustices inflicted against Japanese
Americans during World War II.
During World War II 120,000 Japanese were
imprisoned in relocation camps on the West Coast of
the U.S.; 70,000 of 120,000 were American-born
citizens, said history Prof. Gerald Linderman.
"It took 40 years to put things in order," Takeshita
said about his experience in the relocation camp. "It
took me 30 years before I could talk about it in public.
I talk about it now more than ever to remind us that
this can happen to anybody."
Ron Aramaki, an Asian representative at Minority
Student Services, said Takeshita's "point is well taken.
The act of hysteria, racism, and scapegoating concerns
everyone. It could happen again to anyone, anywhere.
Rights could be taken away."
"I think it's a beautiful gesture," said Sociology
Prof. Robert Cole of the memorial service. "It's a
meaningful thing that moves even the most cynical. If
more people did things like this, it would be a better
world." Cole is the former director of Japanese studies
at the University.

Daily Photo by DAVID LUBLINEA
Students demonstrate against Central Intelligence Agency recruiting interviews outside the Career Planning
and Placement office at the Student Activities Building last Wednesday. Rackham graduate student Harold
Marcuse (center) was later kicked in the groin as protestors pushed into the CPP offices.
Witnesses say campus ofcer
kicked student at (714protest

Multi-cultural books featured at UGLi

(ConUnued from Page 1)
Marcuse was lying on the floor,
groaning, as protestors shouted de-
mands that the police arrest the per-
son who, they said, kicked Marcuse.
Marcuse lay in the hallway for
about 45 minutes before he was es-
corted to City Hall. He had a cut on
his elbow, but was able to walk.
Protestor Tina Mahler, a regis-
tered nurse, tried to get into the
hallway, but was refused access.
LATER, POLICE called
Mahler into the hallway to help
Marcuse. "His testicles were mashed
in," Mahler said later, "and he has a
rug burn."
At 9:10 a.m., May read protestors
the Trespass Act as they clapped and
chanted. Ten minutes later, Conn
threatened to arrest the protestors if
they did not peacefully move back
into the room. At that point, about
15 protestors moved back into the
room, and 20 minutes later, the oth-
ers left the building.
Conn said University public
safety officers wanted police to arrest
the protestors. But, he said, by not
arresting anybody, the incident had
"a positive end, and hopefully I will
be judged accordingly."
Heatley refused to comment.
PROTESTOR JEFF Gearhart,
a graduate student in the School of
Natural Resources, said the Marcuse
incident is a reason not'to deputize

University security officials. The
officer kicked Marcuse, but if he had
a gun, Gearhart said, the conse-1
quences would be worse.
The State Senate approved a bill
last month that would allow the
University to deputize public safety
officers, but left final decisions up to
the Board of Regents.
Similar protests against CIA
recruiting occur periodically at uni-
versities around the nation, since the
CIA recruits at over 300 schools,
said CIA spokesperson Sharon Fos-
ter.
IN OCTOBER 1984, a CIA
presentation was interrupted at the
University's Modern Languages
Building, and interviews were post-
poned.
The following year, 26 students
were arrested, during a similar
protest at the Student Activities;
Building.
LSA senior Donna Napiewocki,
one of those interviewed by CIA re-1
cruiters Wednesday, said she was
"surprised there were so many people
around to protest."
"I wanted to see what they're all
about," she said, adding, "I'm sick of
people protesting every time people
care politically. This gives the
school a bad reputation - they don't
need to have security guys in the
lobby."
Napiewocki, who interviewed be-

fore the protestors charged the office,
said she plans to take the CIA's
professional test next January, andj
that she will work there if she
doesn't get other offers in Washing
ton, D.C.
LSA FIRST YEAR .student
Mark Brotherton said he wanted to
make an interview appointment, bui
didn't set one up in advance, so h4
was not interviewed .Wednesday
"I'm here, strangely enough, for a
lot of the same reasons the
protestors are here," Brotherton said.
"The best way to make changes is
from within... It's possible to influ-
ence or remedy problems internally
through the CIA."
According to a press release from
the University's Latin American
Solidarity Committee, which sup-
ported the protest, the CIA has a
"heinous record of crimes against
humanity. From Guatemala in 1954,
,o the Dominican Republic in 1965,
to Chile in 1973, the CIA has suc-
ceeded in toppling governments and
instating terror-torture regimes
which protect American business
interests.... In (Nicaragua) it has
created, trained and funded a 'contra'
force, whose strategy is to defeat the
democratically- elected Sandinista
government by terrorizing the popu-
lace and sabotaging their resources."

By JEFF ARCHER
The display of book jackets from
newly-ordered books in the lobby of
the Undergraduate Library is the
work of the Peer Information Coun-
seling program.
' PIC made the display, entitled
"Celebrate Diversity," to show the
UGLi's current efforts to keep its
circulation up with many of the
timely subjects which are of interest
on campus. The new books cover
feminism, Black history, and inter-
national relations.
PIC is a "minority support
group" which operates through the
UGLi. It was established in 1985
and it has kept the reference and aca-
demic resource center desks at the
UGLi staffed with minority students,
said PIC head Darlene Nickols.
The PIC program was created to
increase the minority presence at the
UGLi and to make all students more
comfortable with using the library's
services.
Group members have also written
bibliographies of minority writings,
which are at the disposal of students

conducting research.
In addition, the program has
sponsored efforts such as the Dorm
Outreach Program, which taught
students in dormitories how to do
research in the University's library
system.
PIC is staffed by a group of nine
counselors, and a group of under-
graduate student volunteers. These
counselors and volunteers work on
preparing the bibliographies and try-
ing to keep information posted at the
UGLi concerning student organiza-
tions.
Nickols said PIC will continue to
prepare more minority bibliogra-
phies for student research. One
problem, she said, is the program
doesn't get enough publicity, and
few students know it exists.
Nickols said the "Celebrate Di-
versity" display demonstrates "the
library's special effort to order cul-
turally diverse literature." There has
been an movement at the UGli over
the past year to try to be more aware
of current student interests, she said.
Richard Jasper, coordinator of

Collection Development at the
UGli, said, though, that the library
staff has always strived to meet the
current interests of the student body.
One member of the Collection
Development department said that
campus interest in racism, arms-
control, and feminism are prompting
the library to order more books from
non-traditional publishers.
The staff also tries to keep aware
of what new kinds of courses are be-
ing offered at the University and or-
der books that meet the needs of
those courses.
Jasper, with the assistance of
seven or eight librarians, decides
what books the UGLi orders. He said
the UGLi orders about 10,000 new
volumes a year.
WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
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Stock crash won't limit jobs

EAST LANSING (AP) - The
job outlook for college graduates is
largely unaffected by the recent stock
market crash, according to a Michi-
gan State University recruiting sur-
vey.
Employers plan to hire 3.8 per-
cent more college graduates this
year, with starting salaries for
graduates with a bachelor's degree

averaging $22,600, the survey
shows.
"Apparently the economy is more
solid than reflected by 'Black Mon-
day' and it did not shake the confi-
dence of the employers as much as
many people believed," said John
Shingleton, who conducted the sur-
vey at Michigan State's placement
services.

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