100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 11, 1987 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-09-11
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U V V V U V U U S U I

w v

7W

a 0 a

Who's the quarterback?.
Brown, Taylor wait for decision

Stadium

enters 60th

3

By DARREN JASEY.
Replacing Jim Harbaugh has
turned out to be quite a chore for the
Michigan coaching staff, but head
coach Bo Schembechler insists that
it will not be a weak position.
According to Schembechler,
juniors Demetrius Brown and
Michael Taylor both have the
enough talent to take over as the
starting quarterback. "I feel we can
win with either one of them
starting," the 19-year Michigan
coach said.
OFFENSIVE lineman John
Elliott agrees. "I'm sure that
whoever Bo chooses could do the job
amply," he said.
Taylor saw action in three games
last season but did not attempt any

passes. The 6-foot, 190 pounder
rushed five times for 33 yards on the
year and scored a touchdown on a
six-yard keeper in the 69-13 Illinois
rout. Brown's only action as a
Wolverine came in that same Illinois
game.
In the '87 Spring Game Brown
gained some attention by completing
12 of 23 passes for 187 yards.
Taylor completed three of four
passes for 23 yards before leaving
with a broken left (non-throwing)
hand.
A 6-FOOT-1, 190 pounder,
Brown (a lefty) is considered the best
passer of the two. Said
Schembechler; "Demetrius Brown
has by far the best throwing arm."
Brown's stronger throwing arm

and performance in the Spring Game
has made him the favorite among the
media and fans. They can already
envision Brown teaming up with
Michigan's speedy receivers, John
Kolesar and Greg McMurtry.
But Schembechler didn't hedge in
Brown's favor during the summer.
At last month's Big Ten Kickoff
Luncheon the Wolverine coach
commented on the quarterback
decision. "It could be the week of the
Notre Dame game before we decide
that," he said. "And if it doesn't
work in the Notre Dame game then
we'll change for the Washington
State game."
BROWN knows that being a
good thrower does not lock him in
as the starter. "It's a nice thing to
say," said Brown after hearing the
high praise, "but it really doesn't say
that I'm the starting quarterback. I
just want to do what it takes to
win."
Meanwhile, Taylor has been
advertised as the quarterback who can
run. Said Schembechler; "Michael
Taylor is the best option quarterback
(of the two) and has a very fine
football mind."
Up until last week the quarterback
battle included Chris Zurbrugg, a
fifth-year senior who decided to forgo
his final year of eligibility. But that
didn't prompt Schembechler to make
an early choice.

mRIfl
STREET
mOTORS

By REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
When Roby Burley attended
Michigan football games as a
member of the class of 1920, the
team didn't play in a stadium, and
was not a member of the Big Ten.
But times have changed for
Burley and thousands of Wolverine
football fans.
Now 60 years old, Michigan
Stadium stands as the biggest
college owned stadium in the
country. It has grown from it's
initial 1927 capacity of 72,500 to its
present capacity of 101,701. And the
possibility of adding a second deck
and another 30,000 seats remains.
"IT'S SUCH a wonderful
feeling for me to walk into the
stadium, see the players and hear the
band," said Burley, 91, who has
flown in from Seattle for the last ten
Homecoming games.
Although Fielding Yost's
conception of the inground stadium
initially generated controversy during
times of a smaller emphasis upon
Michigan football, it has proved to
be a remarkable investment for
Michigan football and athletics.
"Any person who had foresight
like that was bound to be criticized
because he was so ahead of his
time," said Associate Athletic
Director Don Lund. "Yost was in a
class by himself."
Yost's dream for Michigan
athletics has undoubtedly turned into
reality marked by tradition. As
Ohio State has led the nation i n
attendance in 21 of the last 36
years. Michigan has led in
attendance for the past 13 seasons.

Yost built the stadium so that
capacity could grow with increasing
demand. When initially constructed
as a totally ingound stadium, the
72,500 capacity was already more
than 25,000 over what the old Ferry
Field could hold. Temporary circus
bleachers increased the capacity to
87,000 fans in time for the
stadium's dedication game against
Ohio State in 1927. In 1949 the
permanent exterior of the stadium
was completed to enlarge the
capacity to 97,239.
"Yost was so proud of the
stadium that he tried to get live
Wolverines into the games," said
Burley. "They didn't let him bring in
the live animals, but he did carry a
stuffed Wolverine."
EXPANSION continued in
1956 when the Communications
Center, or press box, freed some
space for additional seating.
Although 20 additional seats were
added this summer, today's official
capacity was reached in 1973 when a
small section of box seats was
replace by bleacher seats.
"Since the stadium was built into

over100,000 people have poured
through the stadium gates to watch
72 consecutive home games since
1975, Michigan has led the nation
for the past 13 seasons in attendance
and holds numerous NCAA
attendance marks. The last time that
attendance did not exceed 100,000
was on October 25, 1975 when a
crowd of 93,857 watched Michigan
beat Indiana.
AND THE tradition of
Michigan football continues to
grow. An increasing and sometimes
competitive demand for football
tickets generates enough revenue to
support the athletic department for
the entire year. Even with one of the

biggest stadium capacities in the
nation, the athletic ticket department
has to turn away a countless number
of requests each year for most
games.
"This year for the first time we
had to turn away a significant
number of people who wanted
season tickets," said Steve
Lambright, of the athletic ticker
office. According to Lambright,
since this year's student demand is
up 10 to 15 percent, there is not as
much room to seat others who want
to participate in the observance of
games that have become a sort of
religion in Ann Arbor.
As an investment for the future,

the s
not
Lund
B
stadi
accc
Man
cont
beau
he sa
throe
mon
this
not
gam
said
four
only
betw
A
$95,
sale
year
the t

Cl

I

Quality Care ForYour FineImported Automobile

l 1 --- ' ----_ 1..

Wf OFFER
Phone 663-5544
SENIOR
SAVINGS- MON.-FRI. 9AM-6PM.
MAIN STREET MOTORS
906 North Main Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48104

- j-'
M 1.,
I
7

FOR TOTAL
SPORTS COVERAGE.

"I still don't know," he said. "It's
going to be Brown or Taylor -
Taylor or Brown. And we may
change them during the game."
As the Notre Dame game draws
closer and closer it is more apparent
that even the quarterback who
doesn't start the game will still see
plenty of action during the year.

I eS

Football
Ride
Only $1.50
each way

RESTAURANT

Air Trainer High

Michigan Daily
SPORTS
763-0376

-f~v"

FAMOUS FOR OUR
HOME-MADE BREAD
" BEST BREAKFASTS IN TOWN (Try the waffles!)
" SANDWICHES *"SALADS
0 CARRY-OUT SERVICE - 761-8996
p Corner of Catherine and Glen
1100 E. CATHERINE (short walk from Med. Center)

Michael Taylor can pass as well as run.

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON

s <

What's
Happening

Air Trainer Low

The Air Trainer High and Law from NIKE
are great for aerobics, running, court sports
andmore. Performance Leather upper pro-
vides a comfortable el with excellent strength
and durabilityFulil-length NIKE-AIRĀ°
cushioning reduces shock and prevents injury.
Cover all your cross-training activities in
NIKE Air Trainers.

Recreational Sports
JOIN US DURING YOUR LEISURE TIME
Intramural Sports Building .....M-F 11am-
606 E. Hoover; 763-3562

8pm

DINEd DALNCE CLUB
powNTOWN YF'5lL.AMTi
SUN MONF~fE S WED 31Fu5J qFRI SAT
WE ALCOME FWY 11 IiTNA' .i
T~c U. 1RN Nt m r s wEFW ;iI z
CON li-of fwrc5of SI v..
SmCKofF Ai A5LE. strs f 4
fb 6f-Ra .ALfP P CAL,,W ~~R
PfYVCIIR GRW'tAcE NoW F

The Ann Arbor
Transporation
Authority provides
shuttle bus service
from most area hotels to the
Michigan Stadium. Enjoy a pr
meal with your out of town gt
at the hotel's restaurant or lo
hop on the bus for a ride righ
gate. After the game continu
the Wolverine's win back at t
For specific boarding informc
locations call (313) 996-0400.
I / THE
Ate' Ride

Central Campus Recreation Bldg. M-F
401 Washtenaw Avenue; 763-3084 Sa
Su

This certificate is
worth $5.00 off the
purchase of any
NIKE athletic shoe
at our price. Ex-
pires 10/31/87

1tP

7am-10pm
9am-10pm
12 N-IOpm
7am- 9pm
9am- 9pm
12N- 9pm

Top-Floor Sports
330 S. State St.
(inside Bivouac)
761-7615

North Campus Recreation Building
2375 Hubbard; 763-4560

M-F
Sa
Su

WATCH FOR REC. SPORTS "WHAT'S HAPPENING" IN
THE DAILY ON MONDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS!

PAGE4 EEND/EPT~yiQR1 ,~ 987 EEKND/SPTEBER 1,198

PAGE 4

W EKENWSEPT MQER;11,.1.487

WEEKEND/SEPTEMBER 11, 1987
h 4 art,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan