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April 22, 1987 - Image 14

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-22

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Page 14 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, April 22, 1987

Black
student
union to
* set new
agenda

(Continued from Page 1)
Black student and faculty
enrollment as well as improve
campus life for minority students.
Several of the BAM and UCAR
demands were partially met or
touched upon by the six initiatives,
but others were not. Four demands
were fully met, such as BAM's
request of a $35,000 annual budget
for the Black Student Union (BSU)
and UCAR's demand for an
honorary degree for jailed South
African anti-apartheid leader Nelson
Mandela.
At the today's rally, the BSU
will present a political agenda for

next year.
BAM member Baron Wallace, a
first-year law student, said that
although all minorities have
common interests and objectives,
each minority group has its own
agenda and specific interests.
BLACK student interests can
be voiced through the BSU, he said.
"We feel that the BSU is the
political arm and umbrella
organization for all Black students,"
Wallace said.
Wallace emphasized that BAM
leaders have always purported that

BAM is not an organization but
rather a mobilization of Black
students and Black student groups.
He said that although the BSU
will be the taking a more
politically active position in
leading Black student causes, BAM
"still has the potential to resurface."
Wallace also suggested the
University's Board of Regents ratify
the six initiatives in order to make
them binding for future,
administrations. In 1970 regents'
ratified the agreement reached by
protesters and the administration.

Veteran officer
loves his work

Vigil to be held in Nag

(Continued from Rage 1)
concentrating on the horror. We're;
trying to capture the cultural beauty
which was threatened as well."
MEMBERS of the Armenian
Students Club draw parallels
between the Armenian genocide and
the Holocaust during World War II.

Unlike the horrors of the
Holocaust, the Armenian case has
gone unremembered, Gurahian said.
Turkey, for instance, denies that
any such event took place.
Governor Blanchard recognized the
Armenian case in a state document
a few years ago.

POLICE NOTES
West Quad Fires
The Ann Arbor Fire Department is investigating five recent trash-can
fires on the fifth floor of West Quad's Williams House, according to
Assistant Director of Public Safety Robert Patrick. According to West
Quad Building Director, Alan Levy, "they were arson, no question."
Patrick said the fires, the last of which occurred Friday night, did not
cause property damage. "This type of fire is common. Even on campus,
people don't agree with a poster and they burn it," he said.
Levy said precautionary measures have been taken. "Smoke detectors
have been put in all of the trash closets and security in the building has
been increased," he said. Also, Levy said all of the trash cans have been
removed from the floor and residents are now being provided with
plastic bags for their garbage.
by Steve Blonder
Let Them Know
How You Feel! !
DAILY PERSONALS 764-0557

(Continued from Page 1)
dramatically. "The biggest change,"
he says, "is that Ann Arbor now is
really a big city in terms of
population, area, and the range of
activities offered."
He attributes this change to the
expansion of the University. "The
University community is now
bigger, more sophisticated, and
seems to draw a better quality of
kids," he continued.
As a result of the growing
University community, "kids are so
in-depth into studying, they are
removed from the real world. They
unintentionally overlook the little
things," Suomala said. Because of
this, the number of larcenies around
campus have increased in the past
years. Still, Suomala considers the
University of Michigan to be the
best in the country.
In addition to working at the
Police department, Suomala is

involved with the Elks, the
Washte.aw County Law
Enforcement, of which he was
president in 1970, and the Michigan
Emergency Management Asso -
ciation.
He is currently secretary of the
MEMA, an organization committed
to improving emergency manage -
ment responses in different parts of
the state. As director of disaster
preparedness, Suomala is in charge
of setting off tornado warnings,
emergency evacuations, and pub-
lishing information on disasters.
Executive Deputy Police Chief
William Hoover said Suomala's
sense of humor makes the work
environment more enjoyable.
"Suomala always has a smile,
and always has got something light
to say which adds to the
pleasurability of working with
him," he said.

I

I.

Move Yourself,,
All Your Stuff,
And Save, Too!

Chin trial jury chosen

7 1oG E
s _.
00 4

CINCINNATI (AP) - The
retrial of a Detroit autoworker
accused in the fatal beating of a
Chinese-American began with jury
selection yesterday, a day after a
prayer service and vigil to show
support for the victim's family.
Ronald Ebens is being tried on
charges he violated the civil rights
of Vincent Chin by fatally beating
him with a baseball bat June 19,
1982, in Highland Park, Mich.

Ebens was convicted in Detroit
in 1984 of violating Chin's civil
rights in the killing, but a federal
appeals court last year reversed the
conviction and ordered a new trial.
U.S. District Judge Anna
Taylor, who is based in Detroit and
who presided at Ebens' original
trial, moved the case to Cincinnati
to avoid the possible impact of
publicity in Detroit.

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