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April 20, 1987 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-20

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ARTS

.TJe Michigan Daily

Monday, April 20, 1987

Page 7

Director Seidelman talks

I

on parents,

pop-culture

By Seth Flicker
Susan Seidelman is a rare breed
of filmmaker in more ways than
one. Firstly, her past two films,
Desperately Seeking Susan and
Making Mr. Right, have been com -
mercial successes. This is unusual
enough but Seidelman has done
something even more unique: she
has kept her identity. Unlike most
filmmakers she has avoided the
Hollywood pitfall of making, what
she calls, the "generic" film. She is
a woman director making films
with a female point of view.
While still at NYU film school,
she made her first feature, Smithe -
reens, the story about a woman try -
ing to get into the nightlife of New
York, got screened at Cannes. Her
second movie, Desperately Seeking
Susan, starring Madonna and Ro -
sanna Arquette, dealt with amnesia,
a stolen pair of earrings and femi -
nist liberation. In Making Mr.
Right , her latest starring John
Malkovich and Ann Magnuson,
Seidelman experiments with sci -

ence-fiction. She's unsure of her
next venture within her three film
contract with Orion. It could be a
black comedy or a female ganster
movie ("It'll be fun to try to do
something with a little action in
it"). Whatever it is though, Sei -
delman refuses to fall prey to the
ways of Hollywood.
D: With your dad as a hardware
salesperson and your mom a tea -
cher, where did your interest in film
come from?
S: I had no interest in film
really until about 19 or 20. In fact,
I rarely went to them that much as
a kid. But I was always interested in
visual arts. I was one of those kids
who took the art tract through high
school and went to art classes start -
ing from age four or five. Then I
went to college actually as a design
major at a place called Drexsal Uni -
versity. You had to pick a major,
so I said, "O.K. I'll be a fashion de -
signer." It was my second year that
I realized that I was getting kind of
locked behind a sewing machine.
This was about 1970, 1971 and
there was so many interesting

things going on in the world and
here I was sitting behind a sewing
machine.
Really as a way just to get
credits to graduate from college, I
started taking classes in the
humanities department and one of
those classes was film appreciation
101. And I had a great teacher. It's
funny how sometimes in your life
one person can kind of turn the
course of your life around. He was
so funny and inspiring about mo -
vies that I became interested.
D: Where did you go from there?
S: Then I took film appreciation
202 and 303. By the time I got to
be a senior I knew that I liked
watching movies but didn't think
seriously about being able to make
one. I didn't even make a short film
in college...I knew that what I
thought I wanted to be, a fashion
designer, I was no longer interested
in. I applied to film school and I
got in. As soon as I started film
school I knew that this is where I
wanted to be. I made my first short
film and I knew that this is what I
See SEIDELMAN, Page 9

Doily Photo by GRACE TSAI

CLASSIFIED ADS 764-0557

Goodbye, winter
The difference was one of eight bands that played under the sun at the first annual Spring Thaw that
drew over 3000 students and $1250 for the Ronald McDonald House.
'Love Life': A celebration of
laughter, family-life,. survival

Continued from Previous Page
HELP WANTED
RESORT HOTELS CRUISELINES, AIR-
LINES, AMUSEMENT PARKS, now ac-
c. ing applications. For more info. & an ap-
rthc. write: National Collegiate Recreation
'Service, PO Box 8074, Hilton Head, SC
2,4938.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF. Work well with
children? Village supervisors, waterfront
staff, (WSI & boating) outdoor education
camp crafts, drama, arts & crafts, sports. Cal
or write for application Jewish Community
tCenter, Camp Wise, B~05 Mayfield Road
Cleveland Heights, OH 44118. (216) 382-
4000, Ext. 267.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT POSITIONS
AVAILABLE MURRAY HOTEL, MACK-
INAC ISLA]b MICHi: Rotation waitresses
& counter sales, cooks & general kitchen
help. Desk Clerks
Dock Porters
Housekeepers
Call, Write or send a resume to:
Murray Hotel Winter Office:
*PO Box 7706 Ann Arbor MI 48107
ACT NOW! (313)66 -5750
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT- Waiters-Wait-
resses. New Baltimore- Al gonac area. Deck-
ers Landing 794-4641 EXP. PREF. Will
train.
Summer Grounds and Maintenance work
help for large housingcoop. May-Aug. Ap-
ply in person-Mon., ue., Thur Fn., be-
tween loam & 3pm at Forest Hill Coopera-
tive, 2351 Shadowood, Ann Arbor. EOE.
SUMMER JOBS
BE ALL YOU CAN BE. WORK FOR
PEACE. SANE is working nationally to re-
verse the arms race and halt military inter-
vention. We're hirng articulate, energetic
people to work in the Ann Arbor office ofour
expanding field network. Salary, benefits
. aid vacation. 663-3913, between la
and4.EE
SUMMER JOBS
$9.00 to start. National chain accepting a i-
cations for full and part-time positions. Inter-
view now, start after finals. Call 728-5101
from 2-6 pm.
SUMMER WORK
ATTENTION PreLaw PreMed, and Busi-
ness majors looking for an opportunity to
gain experience to help with major. Univer-
/sity of Michigan Students that are selected
will have the chance to spend the summer in
Southem Califomia and eam $4,440. Inter-
views held April 20 and 21 at the Michigan
League at 1:00, 4:00 and 7:00 in the Studio
Room (20th) and the Conference Room 1 and
2 (2 1st) Please be prompt.
LOOKING FOR SUMMER WORK?
Contact
Norrell Temporary Services
769-0588
" Excellent pay
" All shifts
" Flexible scheduling
STUDENT
NURSES
Learn While You Earn!
The Ann Arbor Veteran's Administra-
tion Medical Center is offering a Nurse
'Extern Program for Baccalaureate Stu-
;dents successfully completing the third
year. The Program begins May 11,
1987, and operates thru August 22. The
following benefits are offered:
"Learning experiences available in
Med/Surg, Critical care, Psych,
Ambulatory Care and Geriatrics.
" $6.35 per hour.
Opportunities on all shifts.
* 24-40 hours per week.
" No holiday duty, Memorial or
Independence Day.
Option to continue on a reduced
schedule with resumption of aca-
demic vear.

HELP WANTED

GOING PLACES

THERE'S A JOB FOR YOU IN A SUM-
MER CAMP. The American Camping Asso-
ciation (NY) will make your appication
avail, to over 300 cams in the Northeast.
Exciting opportunities or colle e students
and professionals. Positions availi all land &
water sports, arts & crafts drama, music,
dance, tnpping, nature I.N.'s L M D's
Aides, kitchen & maintenance. C~OLLEGE~
CREDIT AVAYABLE. CALL OR WRITE
FOR APPLICATION. AMERICAN CAMP-
ING ASSOCIATION, 43 W. 23 St., Dept
S4M1), New York, N.Y. 10010, 212-645-
6620.
TRAVEL On campus sales persons wanted.
Excellent Commissions. Grand View Travel
313-583-7555.
WANT TOENJOY SUMMER IN A2?
Loving childcare needed in our home, begin.
May179. Position incl. responsibilit forin-
fant girl 8-5 M-F, & 5 yr. old gir M &F
only. Lge, comf. home w/ decks & pool.
Live-in or live out. Own transportation &
non-smoker desired. 747-7182.
WANTED: GUITAR INSTRUCTOR FOR
SPRING TERM DURING FREE TIME.
Denise, 996-4152.
WORK FOR ACADEMIC CREDIT OR
VOLUNTEER at the Pound House Chil-
dren's Center this Spring and Summer. Reg-
ister for Project Community or Project Out-
reach for Fall Placement at Pound House.
Located at Hill and E. University. Come over
for a visit or call 764-2547 for more informa-
tion.
WORK OUT WEST THIS SUMMER
Last chance...Don't miss out! Find out why
3,500 students nationwide will be working
with us this summer. Students selected have
the opportunity to make $1,480/month. Inter-
views Monday April 20 at 1:00, 4:00, and
7:00 at the Michigan League (Studio Room)
and Tuesday Apri21 at :00, 4:00 and 7:00
in conferenceb oom 1Iand 2. Bring Pen and
Paper. Please be on time.
Writers; Good pay! Send your resume and
ten best writing samples in your major or
specialty to COLLEGIATE REFERECE
PUBLICATIONS, P.O. Box 2964, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48106. Positions are limited!
BUSINESS SERVICES
ELLIOTT DELIVERY-- Specializing in
moving sinle items or vanloads. 995-4220
SUMMER STORAGE! Also SHIPPING to
NY, NJ. Student rates include pick-up & de-
liv. Call MICHIGAN MOVERS today- 668-
0972.

BIKE THE ROCKIES!!
AND RAFT THE COLORADO
Call Bivouac Travel, 761-8777
BUMPED FROM AIRLINE?
We'll buy your ticket
Paying CASH DOLLARS now
Jeff 662-3709

CALIFORNIA BOUND
Excellent summer .opportunity! Students
looking for a challenging way to spend their
summer while developing effective commu-
nication skills and eaming $4,440 should call
662-2902 for more information. Don't hesi-
tate ...Go for it!
CALL REGENCY TRAVEL for low fares to
Europe. the Orient, and around the world.
Ask about Eurail and Britrail passes. Call
665-6122.
FREE TRIPS to China & Orient. Ask how.
Grand View Travel 313-583-7555.
Spring fever?
Get away for 3 days, 2 nights in Traverse
Cit. Cheap off-season rates, lodging for 2
$0 Cabin for 4, $60. That is total cost folks!
(616)-276-9502.
TRAVEL PLANS: For interviews,going
home, pleasure. Complete Travel, 761-6500.

By Sherry Lichtenwalner
Those of us who don't have one
of our own and even those who do
should definately see Love Life.
The University's revival of this
1948 musical is a fabulous produc -
tion; a gala spectacle full of magic,
love, and music, complete with
show girls in spangled leotards with
feathered headpieces. This past
Thursday at the Power Center, uni -
versity students staged this first-
time revival of the Lerner/Weill
vaudeville with finesse and an un -
beatable cast.
The show, called a "concept
musical", depicts the life of Sam
and Susan Cooper and their two
children over a 150 year span, be-
ginning in 1791 and continuing to
1948. It is interspersed with vaude -
ville acts that parallel the events
that touch the lives of this family
in Mayville, Connecticut. As Sam
and Susan progress through the
industrial revolution, emancipation,
and the stock market crash, they
change and grow apart. This mu -
sical is the story of their love and
the effect society has on that love.
The excellent, and rather large
cast, was headed by Sam (Doug
LaBrecque), Susan (Sharon Rosin),
and a series of vaudeville actors led
by Matt Chellis and Ty Hreben.

LaBrecque was just wonderful; a
powerful stage presence with a great
voice to boot. Although the orche -
stra tended to overpower the singers
at times, on the whole the text was
easily understood. The vaudeville
songs in particular were very hum -
orous and the words are important.
Chellis and Hreben, both strong
singers, successfully imported these
words to the audience.
Chellis has a ridiculously won -
derful voice, complete with a range
that seems to extend to the near
heavens. All of the vaudeville
scenes were terrific. Among the
best were "Progress"(which is, as
they say, "bigger than sex"), "Eco -
nomics" ("bad for love"), and "Ho,
Billy-O", a hysterical madrigal seg -
ment. The cast's enthusiasm
throughout the show was conta -
gious and the audience had as much
fun as they did. I found myself
wishing I was one of the two wo -
men who carry in the vaudeville
placards before each act, resplendent
in shimmer tights and a sequined
leotard.
The technical aspects of this pro -
duction were also excellent. The
costumes were fantastic (I wanted
all the 1930's dresses), the set was
simple yet perfect for the pro -
duction, and the lighting carried
much of the dramatic impact. After
Susan and Sam separate, Sam sits
alone in a small hotel room as a
purple light blinks bleakly in front
of him. It makes his desolation

complete. The orchestra, although
small, was excellent and the cho -
reography was especially well-done.
The first act, concerning Sam
and Susan at their happiest, was so
upbeat and cheerful that when the
woman seated behind me vomited
in my ample nest of hair and on my
sweater and skirt, I took it very
well. Isn't that special?
I laughed, and so did everyone
around me. Of course, the woman
didn't bother to apologize, but no
matter. Just the fact that out of all
the people in the theatre she could
have spewed on, it had to be me.
Good news travels fast and I heard
from a cast member that my un -
fortunate incident had reached the
cast's theatrical ears. Yes, it was
me. If it had been any other time, I
would have possibly belted her one
or at least yelled at her. But this
musical was so dang happy (I'm
serious, here) that what did I do?
Laughed!
The final conflict in the show is
between reality and illusion. Sam
and Susan struggle to find true hap -
piness and each other as they are
shown illusion after illusion but,
on the other hand, reality is not
always the happiest road. Remem -
ber: "The children are watching."
More than the children should be
watching this funny yet poignant
musical. In light of the superior
production of the University, this
musical will hopefully enjoy a long
and successful revival.

TICKETS

**U2 T1X** 1 pr. 3rd row center. Chance of
a lifetime! Best offer. 763-2905.
2 R.T. AIRFARES TO CALIFORNIA. 4/30-
5/12. $200 each. Call Nancy, 764-5108.
DETROIT-BOS'lON TICKET. $50. Sat.,
May 2. Departs at 6:40 am., 764-5026, Pedro.
Detroit-Newark Ticket. $45. Fri May 1.
Leaves at 4:55pm. Call Dan, 668-2417.
FLY EAST CHEAPLY! One ticket from
Detroit to Washington/Dulles for $39! Ticket
is good Ma 3 for a 7:15pm plane. Call Lau-
ren at 747-7520.
FLY TO WASH DC CHEAP! R.T. or one
way 5/2-5/19. $50. Call 764-8620.
U2 TICKETS!!! Main Floor-14th row-
WOW! Best offer. Call 764-6979 or 764-
4868.
MISCELLAN EQUS

ROOMMATES

Join
the
summer
Daily
Arts

IT'S COOL TO SAY "HI"!

1/2 FEMALES TO SHARE A 2 BEDROOM
APT. with other female May-Aug. AC, dish-
washer, 1333 Wilmot b-3. 663-21.
2 ROOMS-HUGE HOUSE. 2 ktchns./living
rms., 3 bath, laund., park. Ma-May, $258 +
util. Great housemates. 747-811.
FALL SUBLET-FEMALE WANTED TO
SHR. 1 BDRM. CHEAP RENT. Good loca-
tion. Sept.-Deconly. Call now for info, 747-
6649.
HOUSEMATES NEEDED-State and
Kingsley. May-May lease. $222/mo. Must
Seel Call 761-3729, evenings.
MALE NEEDED FOR SPRING-SUMMER
SUBLET in 2 bedroom apt. near athletic
campus. Parking, laundry & AC $125
(Negotiable). 747-6142.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED TO LIVE
W/ 3 OTHERS. $200/mo. Good location.
Sept. to Sept. lease. Call 665-4870..
NEED COOL PEOPLE TO SHARE a hap-
penin' house- 5 minutes from campus. Rent
neg. Call 764-8736 or 764-5778.
NOT A CAMPUS DUMP! MUST SEE!
CALL NOW! 1 bdrm. in coed home 839
Oakland. Non-smoker, Grad/Prof. I rian,
663-3444.

Reggae drummer killed

THE BAHA'I FAITH: God is one, man is
one, and all the religions are one.

Kingston, Jamaica (AP) --
Carlton Barrett, drummer for the
late reggae musician Bob Marley,
was shot and killed outside his
Kingston house, police said.
Authorities said the 40-year old
Barrett was killed Friday night.
His widow, Albertine Barrett,
told police she was watching
television when she heard gunfire.
Authorities said Barrett was shot

twice in the head.
Police said the killing was under
investigation, no motive has been
determined and no suspects have
been arrested.
Barrett, a member of the Wailers
Musical Group, had just returned to
Jamaica following an engagement
in Miami. He had been scheduled to
tour Europe with the band starting
May14.

MUSICAL

STEREO EQUIP- Carver Sonic Holigram
$125 JVC TX-900 Tuner $199. Mike 747-
6385.
TAPES: Maxell XL1190 and TDK SA90 as
low as $1.90/tape. Other avail. 668-7981.
VIOLIN 1971 G.A. FICKER, exc. tone, var-
nish. $1 00.763-2886 Bryan.
COMPUTER MDSE.
COMPUTERS printers, modems. Specials
this month on 200B Modem only $ . Call
Automation Link, 747-9000.
SOFTWARE, MS WORKS $149, MS
WORD (PC), $239, MS MOU'SE, $59. 665-
7184.

Page
Call: 763-0379

I

I

s val
r ~

l
F

The University of Michigan School of Music
presents
Tuesday, April 21
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA /
UNIVERSITY CHOIR / CHAMBER CHOIR /
FACULTY ORCHESTRA / SCZCECIN POLY-
TECHNICAL INSTITUTE CHOIR /

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