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April 17, 1987 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-17
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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MICH-ELLANY

ROUND MIDNIGHT
ORIGINAL MOTION
PICTURE SOUNDTRACK
including:
Round Midnight/Body And Soul
How LonHas This Been Going On?
Chans Song (Never Said)/Fair Weather

We do more than just publish typos

INTERVIEW

J.

Heard

Jazz drummer talks about racism, and rock-
I was playing that shit when I was a kid!'
Detroit native J.C. Heard began his professional drumming career in
1938 when he moved to New York to play with piano great Teddy
Wilson. Heard quickly rose to the top of the jazz world, recording with
Billie Holiday, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, and many others. In 1953,
after an all-star jazz tour of Japan received an enthusiastic reception,
including ticker-tape parade, Heard made Japan and the Orient his home
for five years, touring extensively and appearing in three films. Heard,
69, has played every jazz and blues style and appeared on over 1,500
albums. He spoke on the phone with Arts Features Editor Alan Paul
from his Troy home.
Daily: What type of projects do you have going on right now?
Heard: Playing with the big band. I have a 13-piece band, been at it for
about five years. We just made a recording. Hopefully we can get it on
the market so I can play universities, high schools, more concerts. We're
a travelling band.
D: Do you see that that type of music is dying out?
H: No, it has never died out, just slowed down a bit on account of rock
and roll and all that shit. But it never died out... and never will because
it's America's greatest art form. It can't die out.
D: Why do you think it is that it's not more...
H: Well, there's politics today. Politics. They copy stuff quick and sell
it to the kids. It's just like fast food hamburgers. They got a war going
with hamburgers, fried chicken, pizza (laughs) ... Make the buck fast.
D: Here it's almost the '90s and you're still playing. Do you feel like a
survivor?
H: Oh yeah. Yeah, and I feel young. I keep a young band. They're like
my children, 19 and 20. The oldest guy in the band besides myself is 32.
D: Why do you do that? Is it intentional?
H: Yeah, because youth... youth's got that fire. It keeps me young, you
know. They could play rock, but a lot of this rock stuff is only a trend
and two years from now it's gone. You don't hear the same people, they
all die out. Not many people survive at that. Like I said, it's a political
situation. It's who you know. That's the main thing about that stuff..
I know alot of guys who switched over. Great jazz guys who got into
fusion, jazz rock, but they still can play jazz. You know, guys like
Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea. They're still great but they switched
over and they're making a lot of money now. It's very hard in jazz to
make the kind of money the rock guys make.
D: Do you think the reason it's hard to make a lot of money in jazz is
that it takes more of a trained ear? It takes more time to listen to it.
H: Right. Today, people don't want to listen to nothing. They don't
want to take the time and that's the bad part of the whole damn thing.
See INTERVIEW, Page 29

MY FOURTH YEAR AT THE
Daily is drawing to a close. By
Daily standards, I am old. Very old.
Almost all of the people who
started writing for the paper in 1983
have moved on. My stories were
edited by people current Daily-ites
have never heard of.
When I joined the Daily, things
were desperate. The paper's ad
revenues were dropping. The circu-
lation was virtually non-existent.
The Student Publications Building
seemed like a financial bunker,
where people who cared too much
and worked too hard slashed out
stories on ancient typewriters.
Today, there are Mac-literate Daily-
ites who have never written a story
on a typewriter.
In 1983, the paper cost fifteen
cents - as much as The Detroit
News. This often averaged out to
almost two cents a page. The Daily
didn't sell. Our audience consisted
of a select few, a perceived elite
who still read, for reasons we
ourselves didn't understand.
The Daily was doomed.
Drastic measures were taken.
The decision was made to end paid
circulation, a source of pride, and
with it, a Daily tradition of more
OFF THE WALL
Looks are not everything.
(in reply)
When that's all you've got, it helps!
-Graduate Library
April 28
Goodbye Grad, and fuck you!
-Graduate Library
ORGASM IS ILLUSION.
(in reply)
Illude me, please!
-Graduate Library
Briarwoodophobia
UCS - anxiety attack
UCR -fear
CS - Briarwood Mall
CR - Briarwoodophobia
1. State St.
2. Parking lot
3. Main Entrance
4. Entering hallway
5. HUDSON'S!!!
-Angell Hall
The sooner you fall behind, the
more time you'll have to catch up.
-Graduate Library
Jazz is jazz, and blues is blues, but
every 28 days, it's RAGTIME.
-Graduate Library
I'm graduating! Now what do I do?
-Graduate Library

than 90 years. The costs of free-
drop circulation forced the paper to
cut six-daycirculation down to five-
day. I was at the meetings where
these strategies were finalized. The
pain and frustration was devastating
the staffers. They were working too
hard for this to happen. They were
giving too much. And it seemed
like none of their effort mattered.
Many people have left the Daily
with these frustrations intact. I am
certain -that some felt they were
leaving a sinking ship. I hope they
come back to visit.
These are good times for the
Daily. If current projections are
true, the paper will break even this
year, and perhaps turn a profit next
year. Circulation is spiralling
upward, and it's hard to find a Daily
after noon. The paper is read, and
generates controversy. It is scru-
tinized. Because the paper is going
out to so many more people, the

editors' responsibilities have in-
creased exponentially.
When I came to the Daily, the
old staffers reminisced about when
the paper used to matter, and make
money. Hopefully by next year,
new staffers will hear people remin-
iscing about when the paper used to
lose money, and that time will
seem almost as distant to them, as
financial security seemed to me.
And I'm convinced that this
turnaround happened largely because
the Daily attracts people who are
possessed of particular character.
Dailyites are an extraordinary excep-
tion to the generalized criticisms of
today's young people. Working at
the Daily necessarily implies sac-
rifice.
Nobody is here for the money.
The money isn't very good. The,
editor-in-chief makes less than 25
cents an hour.
Moreover, Dailyites sacrifice
pieces of their social lives, and
percentages of their grade-points.
And they do this for a product
that by its very nature has guar-
anteed flaws. The Daily is
editorially independant. It is run by
students, who must occasionally
See LOGIE, Page 29

THE GREGG
ALLMAN BAND
PM NO ANGEL
I'm No Angel/ThIngs That Might Have Been
Anything Goes/its Not My Cross To Bear
Yours For The Asking
WORLD PARTY
PRIVATE REVOLUTION
including:
.gShip Of Fools/Private Revolution
S All Come True

SPANDAU BALLET
THROUGH THE BARRICADES
How Many Lies?
hrouh The Barrica es/Cross The Line
Fight For Ourselves/Snakes And Lovers
3
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Blowin' Like A Bandit/I Want A Ne*
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SPORTING

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315
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BRING SCHOOL SPIRIT
HOME WITH YOU

DAILY FILE PHOTO
A late-semester practice session at the School of Music, April 12, 1960.
THE DAILY ALMANAC

15 years ago - April 11,
1972: As new reports about U.S.
bombing of Hanoi were being made
public, what were professors in the
Classics Department protesting?
"The requirement of unnecessary
and unsightly stair railings within a
room of great beauty and historic
importance to the University."
In response to state regulations,

a series of railings were installed in
the foyer of Angell Hall. The de-
partment's petition to the LSA dean
complained that the "shoddy Danish
Modern" fixtures "disrupt visually
the horizontal line of the stairs and
divide its width into a series of
discrete compartments that would
be entirely out of keeping with (the
foyer's) monumentality."

LO
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LUJ
WU

THIS SUMMER... FEATURI
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TRADITION!
SMichian PGO BLUE AT Si&Goetz

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Karel
araphanalia

PAGE 28 WEEKEND/APRIL 17, 1987

PAGE 28

WEEKEND/APRIL 17, 1987

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