100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 17, 1987 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 17, 1987- Page 3

Hispanics
address
lagging
enrollment
By DAVID WEBSTER
Representatives of the Uni-
versity's Hispanic community cal-
led for the University to "publicly
commit itself to achieving a
minimum of five percent overall
Hispanic enrollment."
Representing the University's
spanic community, six members
of The Council of Hispanics for
Higher Education (CHHE) met with
University President Harold Shapiro
on Wednesday to discuss their
proposed plan of action. The plan
includes eight objectives aimed at
increasing Hispanic enrollment,
iepfesentation, and financial aid on
canipus.
Hispanic enrollment at the
University is now at 2.1 percent.
This figure is below both the state
hlispanic population level of 2.4
percent and the national level of 8.7
percent. CHHE is seeking a 5
percent "weighted average" of in-
state and out-of-state Hispanic
populations.
4 Currently, there are only 621
is anic students enrolled at the
University, including 358 under-
graduates. If CHHE's goal of five
percent Hispanic enrollment is
achieved, it would raise the
undergraduate Hispanic enrollment
to more than 1,000 students.
One problem CHHE has en-
countered in addressing the under-
Irepresentation of Hispanics is that
University statistics on Hispanic
enrollment include both Hispanics
who are U.S. citizens and non-
citizen Hispanics. The statistics are
based on the federal government's
definition of Hispanic, which
includes persons of Spanish,
Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban,
Central and South American origin
who are of Spanish descent.
These statistics need to be
segregated to more accurately reflect
the number of U. S.-born Hispanics
at the University, according to
Hector Garza, chair of the
University of Michigan Hispanic
Alumni Council.
"The enrollment figures (for
Hispanic students) are inflated in
Ithe fact that these statistics include
non-U. S. Hispanics who have had
a very different experience than U.
S. Hispanics," Garza said.
Shapiro has agreed to meet again
with the members of CHHE by the
end of next week to further discuss
their objectives. At a meeting on
Wednesday, CHHE decided that they
will take a strong stance at the next
meeting and demand that certain
objectives be met by the end of the
current term.

Asian students
rally for justice

By EUGENE PAK
Students rallied on the Diag
yesterday in support of an up-
coming civil rights trial against the
killers of Vincent Chin, a Chinese-
American murdered in 1982.
More than 150 students, mainly
Asian-Americans, carried signs
proclaiming, "Right a Civil
Wrong" and the last words Chin
spoke before his death - "It isn't
fair," to protest the controversial
court proceedings against his
murderers.
On June 19, 1982 in Highland
Park, Michigan, Chin and three
friends went to a club for Chin's
bachelor party. Outside the club,
Ronald Eben, a Chrysler auto
director, and his stepson Michael
Nitz, beat him with a baseball bat.
Chin died four days later.
Ebens and Nitz confessed to
killing Chin and Judge Charles
Kaufman sentenced them to three
years' probation and a $3780 fine.
Asian community members for-
med the American Citizens for
Justice (ACJ) in response to the
trial, and demanded a reversal of the
decision, but Kaufman refused.
ACJ later brought about a retrial
of Ebens and Nitz, where Ebens
was sentenced to 25 years in prison
for violating Chin's civil rights and

Nitz wasn't charged. Ebens appealed
the decision and won. But due to
public protest, he will be re-tried
April 21 in Cincinnati, Ohio.
"How the hell can you put
$3000 price tag on Vincent Chin's
life?" John Yamamoto, a second
year law student, asked.
Yamamoto urged Asian students
to become involved in fighting this
and other incidents of racism. "It's
time for Asian-Americans to stop
being so self-conscious and inhi-
bited... my message to you is to
get off your ass and participate."
Art Teshma, vice-president for
ACJ, urged students to sign up for
ACJ-sponsored rides to Cincinnati
to attend the court hearing.
"We see students as keys to the
future and without your partic-
ipation and commitment, our pro-
gram would be in vain and we don't
want that to happen," Teshma said.
University of Michigan Asian
Student Coalition (UMASC) Pre-
sident Ray Lin said that the Reagan
Administration recently produced a
report that said that incidents of
anti-Asian violence have increased
in the United States.
"If they see there's a problem,
then it must be pretty bad," Lin
said.

Daily Photo by ANDI SCHREIBER

Protest
LSA juniors Kaie Nelson and Max Mons lead a Students Against Religious intolerance rally yesterday in front
of the Student Publications building, in protest of the Daily's "God is Dead" editorial.
Students will not be sanctioned

By CALEB SOUTHWORTH
The Dean of the College of Engineering will not
impose sanctions on the students involved in the
"Road Rally II," in which boards from the Diag
shanty were removed as part of a scavenger hunt.
Instead, the school will solicit student input in
response to accusations of racism.
According to Elain Harden, assistant to
engineering Dean Charles Vest, his initial response
to the hunt item was "outrage." But the College of
Engineering will take no disciplinary action against
individual students or student groups. The event was
held by the Mechanical Engineering Societies
Committee last Saturday.
Harden said that student leaders within the school
have met with Vest and will be proposing methods
to educate engineering students in racial awareness.
"We cannot simply issue a mandate or take
disciplinary action from out office," Harden said.
"The mandate must come from the students in order
to have a long term solution and raise awareness of
racism."

Paul Puzinauskas, president of the Society of
Automotive Engineers and a Rackham graduate
student, said that his group did not officially
sponsor the activity, nor does it belong to MESC.
Some of his members did participate as individuals,
he said.
"I personally did not understand the implication,"
Puzinauskas said. "I am sure that there was no
malicious intent. People simply did not think."
The United Coalition Against Racism is
planning to press charges against students who
removed the shanty's boards.
UCAR steering committee member Barbara
Ransby said, "I believe part of what administration
has to do is show that there are consequences for
racism."
Ed Balashack, an MESC member and organizer
of the scavenger hunt, said, "I am concerned that
people would think we were out to produce a racist
event. Items on the list were chosen by their
availability."

COURT NOTES

Sentencing
Former University student Jae
Kim was convicted of fourth degree
criminal sexual conduct yesterday in
Washtenaw County Circuit Court.
Kim was sentenced yesterday to 30
days in jail and two years probation
for the charges, stemming from
incidents in Mary Markley
Residence Hall where Kim molested
two women. Fifteenth District

Court Judge Pieter Thomassen also
sentenced Kim to two concurrent
30-day jail sentences on the
remaining charges of assault and
battery and improper use of license
plates. Pieter ruled that the two
sentences should be served
concurrently with the first. Kim
was also ordered to pay between
$500-$600 in court costs.
by Steve Blonder

'U' alumnus
NEW YORK (AP) - University
alumnus and former Daily editor
Daniel Biddle won a 1987 Pulitzer
Prize for investigative reporting yest -
erday. Biddle currently works at the
Philadelphia Inquirer, and won the
award along with H.G. Bissinger and
Fredrick Tulsky of The Inquirer for
their, series "Disorder in the Court,"
involving scandals in the Philadel -
phia court system. The stories led to
federal and state investigations.
The Philadephia Inquirer won a
total of three Pulitzer Prizes for
journalism yesterday.
John Woestendiek, who won one
of the two investigative rewards for
his "outstanding prison beat report -
ing," including the stories that helped
free an innocent man, said the an -
nouncement of the prize was the "se -
cond most wonderful moment in my
life next to the birth of my children."

gets Pulitzer
The Inquirer's third award, for feat -
ure writing, went to Steve Twomey
for a profile of life aboard an aircraft
carrier.
HIGH QUALITY
LOW PRICES
SINCE 1973
'1002 PONTIAC TR.
99 4-1367

THE IRISH RUGBY...
now with custom embroidered
Michigan Academic Crest

Grand Opening Special
I Shop comig.
I HAIR WEAVING - ALL SHOPS
I 55.00 off with coupon i
- - ---------.-----=-- - - -=

LUbrnt"imCOIILEY
IMPORTED IRISH WOO1ENS
213 S. STATE, ANN ARBOR
662-665
New Shipment of
Michigan Rugbys Arriving

p

photo &campus
services

HIDDEN IN THE
BASEMENT OF LSA ..

The University of Michigan Photo & Campus Services
COMPUTER PRODUCTS AVAILABLE
FOR CASH SALE
Including...
SUPPLIES AND ACCESSORIES
FOR MACINTOSH COMPUTERS
SOFTWARE

SUMMER SCHOOL IN CHICAGO

Where is it written that summer school has to rob you of
your whole summer? Not in the Summer Class Schedule at
Roosevelt University in Chicago. In fact, this summer
we have six separate terms of varying lengths and starting
dates. Classes are offered in more than 50 subject areas
on days, evenings and weekends at both our campuses in
Downtown Chicago and suburban Arlington Heights.
So if you'll be in the Chicago area this summer, look
into Roosevelt University. Our many terms make it easy for
you to earn additional credits toward your degree. For a
free Summer Class Schedule call (312) 341-2000 or send
in the coupon below.
I Q ROOSEVELT UNIVERSITY MI
I WELLSPRING OF SUCCESS I
| Office of Public Relations .I
430 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60605I

ROOSEVELT WILL OFFER
COURSES THIS SUMMER IN:
Accounting Administrative
Science Advertising African,
Afro-American & Black Studies
" American Studies " Anthropology
" Bachelor of General Studies
" Biology " Business Administration
" Business Law " Chemistry
* Comparative Literature " Computer
Science " Computing & Information
Science s Dance * Economics
" Education " Electronic Engineering
Technology " Engineering Science
" English " English Language
Program " External Degree
" Finance French *"Geography
" Gerontology German History
" Industrial Engineering * Information
Systems " International Studies
" Air malim 9 1 * I ria innti

MacWrite
MacPaint

Microsoft Word for Mac 3.0
Microsoft Word for IBM-PC 3.1

SUBLICENSED SOFTWARE

Sysat 3.0 (DOS)

Sysat 3.0 (Macintosh)

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan