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April 14, 1987 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ninety-seven years of editorialfreedom

L

PVOLUME XCVII - NO. 133

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN - TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 1987

COPYRIGHT 1987, THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Anxious
interns
wait for
summer
offers
By REBECCA COX
As the end of the school year
draws near, the drawer full of
rejection letters grows heavier - a
familiar thing for juniors who
applied for summer internships in
January.
But finding an internship can be
just as difficult and more compe-
titive than getting a "real" job.
Engineering junior Charlie
Loesel applied for internships
through the Business Internship
Program. Loesel was calm until the
last three weeks in March, when
nothing came through.
"I got the runaround from a
couple of different companies. They
really didn't know what they nee-
ded, and when I started getting
caught up in all of these hassles I
got discouraged. Finally all of my
leads dwindled down into nothing,
so I was left with nowhere to go,"
he said.'
LOESEL decided to register for
summer classes, but then Ford
Motor Co. called him. He is now
waiting for an offer. But even if he
doesn't get an offer, he's not too
worried.
"My employer from last year
decided to rehire me. He offered me
a salary high enough to compete
with my internship, so that gives
me something to fall back on,"
Loesel said.
The, Business Internship Pro-
gram helps students find internships
in big businesses, and the Public
Service Internship Program pro-
vides internships in government,
mostly in Washington and Lansing.
LSA junior Eric Winiecke found
his internship last year with the
help of the Office of Career Plan-
ning and Placement by joining the
Public Service Internship Program.
Winiecke spent a summer as a poli-
cy analyst at an office in Wash-
ington, D.C.

Pierce
aborts
equity
By PETER MOONEY
Former Ann Arbor Mayor Ed Pierce
signed a resolution calling for the hiring of a
consultant for the city's pay equity study
just a few hours before his term expired.
Pierce's move Sunday prevented newly
sworn-in Mayor Gerald Jernigan from
vetoing the resolution at last night's city
council meeting.
The pay equity study will determine
whether sexual discrimination exists in the
city's pay structure. Council Democrats have
said the study is needed because of city
payroll statistics showing women earn $1
for every $1.25 earned by men.
THE CITY CHARTER allows the
mayor up to 72 hours, not including
Sundays and holidays, to veto actions passed
by the city council. The resolution was
passed Thursday evening. Jernigan had said
he believed the charter gave him authority to
veto the resolution.
But an interpretation of the city charter by
Ann Arbor City Attorney Bruce Laidlaw
issued Friday said that "if prior to the
expiration of his term, the Mayor is
presented with the record of the April 9
proceedings, he would have the authority to
approve those proceedings. In my opinion,
such an approval would prevent a subsequent

veto
veto of any of those proceedings."
Since Pierce's term ended Sunday at
midnight, proponents of the resolution had
to move quickly to get it signed by Pierce.
According to Gregory Scott, a member of
the city's Human Rights Commission, "We
got it out Saturday. We used Dash mail. We
actually had the airlines do it."
THE COMMISSION has a sub-
ommittee which is specifically responsible
for pay equity. In the beginning of March, it
began meeting with City Administrator
Godfrey Collins and Personnel Director Bill
Scott.
Gregory Scott said all were in agreement
that a consultant was needed. He added that
Ronnie Steinberg, a Professor of Sociology
and Women's Studies at Temple University,
will be hired as the committee's consultant.
"We felt Ronnie Steinberg was tech-
nically and politically the best qualified
person," Scott added.
Jernigan has said that he opposed the
hiring of the consultant because he believed
the commission should handle the study on
its own.
Steinberg will advise to committee on the
technical aspects of its responsiblities. These
include commissioning and taking bids on
See RESOLUTION, Page 2

Daily Photo by DANA MENDELSSOHN

Local musician Ron Necros and his girlfriend Karen, an art school junior, show off their tat-
toos. Karen's is a copy of a Georgia O'Keefe painting. The couple also have matching tattoos of
a lizard.
Tattoos make mak>
on student body
By EDWARD KLEINE
Once the province of bikers, dockworkers, and
inhabitants of Old Sailors' Homes, tattoos have
moved into the social mainstream, adorning the
bodies of nurses, ,business people, and even
University students.
Award-winning tattoo artist Suzanne Fauser, who
has been tattooing in Ann Arbor for seven years, said
the number of college students getting tattoos is on
the rise. "You're seeing a younger clientele now," she
said. "I rarely saw anyone from the University until
about a year ago."

MSA aids end-use'cause

By MARTHA SEVETSON
"We're working for a safer and more
peaceful world, and for a University that's
committed to that," said LSA junior Jackie
Victor, co-chair of the Michigan Student
Assembly's Peace and Justice Committee.
Before she was elected co-chair last week,
Victor worked closely with the committee,
MSA's military research advisors, the
Women's Alliance for Nuclear Disarmament,
and several other organizations to promote a
"weapons research-free University."

The culmination of these efforts will be a
vigil in Regents' Plaza on Thursday to save
the "end-use" clause of the classified research
guidelines. The clause forbids classified
research potentially harmful to humans.
VICTOR said the vigil will show
community support for retaining the clause.
"End-use may or may not be effective, but
the University is making the statement that
they don't want research to be done the
intent of which is to kill or maim human
See MSA, Page 3

See JUNIORS, Page 5 See STUDENTS, Page 2

Old shanty targeted
by scavenger hunters

By CALEB SOUTHWORTH
Two students participating in the
Engineering Society Committee's
Road Rally II were caught vanda -
lizing the old shanty on the Diag
and handed over to Ann Arbor
police this weekend.
Participants in the hunt were
given three hours to amass points
by collecting items such as
PIRGIM posters, Black Action
Movement posters, United Coa -
lition Against Racism posters, and
pieces from the shanty.
The rally was a scavenger hunt
sponsored in part by the Society of
Automotive Engineers and the
American Society of Mechanical
Engineers (ASME). University se-
curity detained the students who
allegedly vandalized the shanty Sat -

urday evening.
At one of the "checkpoints" in
the scavenger hunt, participants
were asked to sign a petition by the
"Coalition for Campus Beauty"
which labeled the shanty an "eye -
sore" and called for its removal.
One source said, "We had no idea
that there would be a shanty peti -
tion before we got there."
ASME member and event orga -
nizer David Cantrell said the peti -
tion was a "joke."
Barbara Ransby, a member of
the Free South Africa Coordinating
Committee (FSACC) and UCAR
steering committee member, said,

Holiday feast Daily Photo by SCOTT ITUCY
LSA sophomore Steve Yuan eats matzos during Passover in the South Quad cafeteria. "My grandmother loved
these things, which got me to try them," he said.

"This is the climate of racism we're
talking about."
"This incident differs from others
in that it cannot be attributed to
random violence. It is a calculated
decision by a group of students to
commit a racist act," Ransby said.
Both FSACC and UCAR plan
to prosecute the perpetrators and
press for a full apology from the
sponsoring organizations.
Cantrell objected. "I want to
make clear that there were no racial
overtones to what was done.
"Though there was a conser -
vative taint, there's nothing wrong
with that. Everyone had fun."
INSIDE
If you oppose Reagan's policy
in South -Africa and Central
America, protest in Washington,
D. C. on April 25.
OPINION, PAGE 4
'Female Parts,' a trilogy of one-
woman acts, plays at the True -
blood Theater through Sunday.
ARTS, PAGE 7

'Aargh,' says Garg after
it is kicked off Diag

Wallace to speak
on past mistakes

By EDWARD .KLEINE
and DAVID WEBSTER
Campus safety officers ordered
Gargoyle staff members to stop
selling the magazine on the Diag
yesterday, ending a 76-year tradition
and possibly preventing the Gar-

drive at the same time.
The Gargoyle has never had a
permit to sell on the Diag, said
Editor Ivan Sanchez, who thinks
the Gargoyle is such a campus
tradition that it shouldn't have to
get a permit.

p+
V
I,,
r j ..-

By CALEB SOUTHWORTH
Mike Wallace's speech at May
commencement will highlight con-
troversy over his 1982 racial
remarks and the objectivity of the
press.
The CBS "60 Minutes" reporter,

issued by a San Diego bank which
recorded the "60 Minutes" inte-
rviews. While the CBS cameras
were off, Wallace made a "joke"
about the contracts.
"You bet your ass they're hard to
read," he said, "if you're reading

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