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April 08, 1987 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-08

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Baseball
Doubleheaders vs. Purdue
Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m.
Ray Fisher Stadium

SPORTS

Softball
Doubleheader vs. Toledo
Today, 3 p.m.
Varsity Softball Diamond

The Michigan Daily

Wednesday, April 8, 1987

Page 9

M' unimpressive in sweep

By GREG MOLZON
Coming off three losses in four games, one might
think that a doubleheader sweep would be all that was
needed to cure the ills and get the Michigan baseball
team back on the right track.
Guess again.
The Wolverines defeated Wayne State, 9-2 and 2-0,
yesterday at Ray Fisher Stadium, but looked so
lackluster and unimpressive in doing so that head coach
Bud Middaugh had the squad back on the field
practicing an hour after the game ended.
After a 45-minute long team meeting, the players
hit off batting tees trying to correct their hitting
problems and get their confidence back. "I pretty much
left it up to them. I'm not making them come back out
(to practice). I just told them what I thought they
should do," said a somber Middaugh.
THE TEAM will have to improve on its batting
for the Big Ten season, which starts this weekend. "To
be a better ballclub you have to improve on the areas
that you feel the need to improve in," said Middaugh.
"Right now, (hitting) is one of the areas that I'd like to
center in on."
Michigan managed just three hits off Wayne State
pitchers Steve DuCharme and Ken West in the second
game of the doubleheader. However, the Wolverines
didn't turn any of those hits into runs, and had to rely
on Tartar mistakes to score.
Michigan's baserunners terrorized Wayne State all
day, as the Wolverines had 14 steals (11 in the first
game) and caused six Tartar errors (five in the opener).
In the third inning of the nightcap, Mike Gillette
got on base after an error. He stole second, was balked
to third, and scored on an errant pick-off attempt by
catcher Alexis Fernandez. The final run of the game
came in the sixth inning, when freshman Greg
McMurtry walked and stole second. He advanced to

third on a fly ball by Bill St. Peter, and scored on a
sacrifice fly by Tom Brock.
DAVE PERALTA pitched five solid innings,
giving up just one hit and no runs. "I thought Peralta
pitched very well," Middaugh said. "You could see how
they banged Iggy (Mike Ignasiak) around a little bit,
that gives you an idea how effective (Peralta) was."
Ignasiak relieved Peralta in the sixth and had five
strikeouts in two innings of work, but did face some
trouble before recording his second save.
In the opener, Wayne State, 13-6, jumped to a 2-0
lead in the first inning off starter John Grettenberger.
Brad Silverstein led off the game with an infield single
and then scored on a Matt Romine triple. Pete Marra
singled in Romine for what would end up being the
Tartars' last run, as Grettenberger, Chris Starr, and
Rick Leonard shut them out the rest of the way.
The Wolverines, 17-5, tied the game with two runs
in the second inning and broke it open with seven more
in the fourth. Terry Stone relieved starter Rich Wood at
the beginning of the inning and left four runs and one
out later.
A McMurtry walk, and singles by Darrin Campbell
and Jim Durham loaded up the bases, and after Rich
Samplinski flied to center, St. Peter promptly put the
ball deep over the left field wall for a grand slam.
Chris Kalafut came in for Stone, and the Wolverines
scored three more runs with the help of two errors, a
walk, a misplayed fly ball, and a wild pitch.
The Wolverines won't be able to count on such
charity when they open the Big Ten season against
Purdue this weekend, so Middaugh hopes some extra
practice will turn the team around. Middaugh will get
a quick chance today to see how the extra work helped
when Michigan hosts the University of Detroit. The
doubleheader was originally scheduled for Detroit, but
has been reset for 2 p.m. at Ray Fisher Stadium.

Doily Photo by SCOTT IUTUCHY
Mike Gillette scores during the third inning of Michigan's 2-0 victory over Wayne State in the second game of
yesterday's double header. Michigan also won the first game, 9-2.

Ir

THE SPORTING VIEWS"

Sugar Ray marvelous
in ending boxing myths

Michigan Daily
SPORTS
763-0376

By LIAM FLAHERTY
The smart money was wrong in
a big way.
Sugar Ray Leonard's victory
over Marvin Hagler Monday night
was no mere upset. It was a
violation of a sacred code, a spit in
the face of past boxing gods. The
hallowed commandments of the
sport - "a good big man always
beats a good little man" and "to rest
is to rust" - were rudely slapped,
taunted, and turned around by
Leonard in the same way he
slapped, taunted, and turned around
Hagler.
THE FEAT was remarkable.
Leonard had more speed, strength,
and stamina than anyone imagined.
Leaving his natural weight of 147
pounds and coming off essentially a
five-year layoff, most fight fans
expected a slower, more stationary
Sugar Ray. Not so, especially in
comparison to the comatose
movements of Hagler. Leonard
maintained good motion throughout
the fight and had sufficient hand
speed to throw numerous
combinations, especially coming
out of clinches.
It was an incredible comeback -
"the greatest sports comeback of all
time" - according to commentator
Tim Ryan. Ryan seemed ready to
place the Resurrection a distant
second to Leonard's return.
But as stunning- as Leonard's
effort was, Hagler's descent was
equally shocking. The Marvelous
One's purported age of 32 has
always been suspect, and on
Monday he looked on the down side
of 40.
HAGLER'S hand speed was
nonexistent, and through the entire
-night he didn't throw two good-
punches consecutively. There were
moments when he had Leonard on
USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDSI
U of M Sailing Team X
I. MASS MEETING .
April 9th
6:30 pm - 311 W. Engineering
The Men of ATO
would like to thank
The Women of AGD
p for the
.~1-dreekl Week eve~r _

the ropes, causing fan's minds to
leap ahead to the furious blizzard of
punches that was surely to come.
Perhaps there have been too many,
both given and received, in Hagler's
long career. At any rate, the
explosions were eerily absent, as
Leonard would put together a quick
flurry and dance away.
Skills flee quickly in boxing,
often without witnesses. Hagler
may have lost the majority of his
goods in his brutal victory over
Thomas Hearns. Or his trainers, the
Petronelli brothers, may have
overtaxed him, leaving his stuff in
the roads and sparring wars that
make up Hagler's Spartan training
regime. It would not be the only
error they made in this bout. Their
strategy of saving Hagler's more
effective southpaw stance until the
third round cost them two rounds
they could have used dearly.
More importantly, in the late
rounds they conveyed no sense of
urgency to their fighter. After the
eighth round, when Leonard didn't

have enough to hurt him anyway,
Hagler should have been wading in
and going for the knockout. Yet he
seemed strangely complacent,
allowing Leonard to run and escape
him. Perhaps this was a final bit of
star-crossed hubris - Hagler
mistakenly thinking his status as
champion would carry more weight
with the judges than would
Leonard's style.
It obviously didn't. Leonard had
every angleworking for him, from
the controversial 12-round limit to
the schoolyard antics that he knew
would rattle Hagler. The final coup
came at the announcement of
Leonard's victory. Hagler stood
stunned. A rematch would show
nothing but a more advanced
exhibition of the effects of age.
Ray Arcel, the most respected
trainer in the game, in explaining
before the match why Leonard
didn't have a shot, repeatedly said,
"You can't beat Father Time." As
Hagler found out Monday, it's a
rule that works both ways.

Associated Press
Despite a five-year layoff, Sugar Ray Leonard had Marvin Hagler
ducking punches while winning the middleweight championship in a split
decision.

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i

I

YOUR PHILOSOPHY PROFESSOR
WILL BE FURIOUS IF YOU READ THIS BOOK!
The book is Rudolf Steiner's Philosophy of Spiritual Activity. And we can't say we'll
blame your professor, either, because the book challenges some of our most cherish-
ed presuppositions.
For instance: that the brain thinks. Not at all, says Steiner. The brain doesn't think
any more than a radio plays a Beethoven symphony. The orchestra plays the sym-
phony. The radio makes it possible for us to listen to it at home. (But try telling that
to a three year old who has never seen an orchestra.) '
Steiner also challenges the notion that there are "limits to knowledge," which we
have accepted as part of the human condition since Kant (d. 1804).
In fact, The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity is written in such a sequence of thoughts
"that, if you read it with enough energy, you come to grasp the nature of thinking
as a sense-free experience. And the nature of the one who thinks as a being of soul
and spirit embedded in a meaningful world.
Which should make your professor very angry. How can anyone speak of soul and
spirit today? What can that possibly mean in a world which accepts the world-as-
perceived as the only reality?
Well . . . we must agree with him. It means nothing if you don't experience it. And
you won't experience it if you don't try.
And if you've read this far you'll realize now you're free to make that choice.

A.

What's Happening
Recreational Sports

NOMINATIONS DUE
Wed., April 15, 1987
for IM AWARDS
Intramural Bldg - 763-3562

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