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April 06, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily- Monday, April 6, 1987- Pa
Research committee approves controversial research proposal
C~n tin d frn Pan 1)

ge 5

(aontinue z romr agei
"I put myself on board (the
ships) because it allows me to run
an engineering experiment,"
Birdsall said. "I want to find out if
b6ir techniques work - I want it to
be a measurement, and I think we'll
succeed." Birdsall said his research
could also be used to detect human
heart murmurs.
But RPC member Jackie Victor,
an LSA junior, said Birdsall's

project "shows to me, clearly, the
need for an end-use clause. A
priority of the Navy is anti-
submarine warfare... it may be
long-term, but who cares? I'll be
around in 40 years."
Policies committee member Ed
Hellen, a Rackham graduate stu -
dent, said the Navy "wants basic
research to address certain problems,
such as the detection of Soviet

submarines near coastal regions,"
adding that the end-use clause
"brings projects like these out into
the open."
Birdsall, who has been involved
with ocean-acoustic tomography
research for 35 years, had a similar
project rejected by the RPC in
1985. Then-Vice President for
Research Albert Sussman, however,
overruled the RPC and accepted the

project. That project expired a
month ago, but his proposal would
extend the research for another two
years.
Currently, two classified research
projects are being conducted at the
University. One, sponsored by the
Department of Defense, involves
materials research; the other,
sponsored by Likert, Rensis, and
Associates, a private firm, deals

with Navy unit organization.
The current research guidelines
may be subject to change at this
month's Board of Regents meeting.
In 1985, after Political Science
Prof. Raymond Tanter had a
controversial proposal unanimously
rejected by both the RPC and
Sussman, University President
Harold Shapiro appointed a 12-
member ad hoc committee to

review the current classified research
guidelines.
Last year, nine members of the
ad hoc committee drafted the
majority report, which calls for the
elimination of the end-use clause in
favor of a policy requiring
researchers to publish all results
within one year of completion of
the project's funding period, except
in special cases.

_ a"

Duderstadt says TAs should consider strike

(Continued from Page 1)
Throughout the memo Duder -
stadt said that because of a failure
on the part of GEO leadership,
members are contemplating a strike
Without knowing the consequences.
J GEO President Alice Haddy
responded that, "We've done our
best to inform staff assistants and
teaching assistants about what's
going on." Haddy was critical of the
nmemo in general, but would not

respond further to specific points.
"Much of that memo... is his
opinion," she said.
Duderstadt wrote that the
University "is working in good
faith to provide an improved salary
and tuition waiver package which is
both equitable and fair."
He made no comment on
whether the GEO is bargaining in
good faith, but in the memo he
expressed concern that the threat of

a strike could impede the mediated
negotiations on Tuesday.
THE University and GEO nego -
tiators are scheduled to meet in
Detroit on Tuesday with mediator
Edmund Phillips for a negotiating
session. That evening, the GEO
will decide whether or not to strike.
"GEO's recent publicity about
the possibility of an April 8 strike
and GEO's notice to cancel the
current agreement on April 8 may

mean that (Phillips) will not have
time to bring us to a successful
resolution of the differences."
Last fall, Duderstadt recalled,
two mediated negotiating sessions
were required before an agreement
was reached.
In the memo, Duderstadt com -
pared the offers of the two sides.
They appear to be far apart. For the
first year, GEO's proposal is
equivalent to a 30 percent salary

increase wherea
proposal is eq
percent salary in
In related act
anthropology fa
a memo to Univ
tiator Colleen D
ing a full tuition
GEO's prime con
Haddy is als
the regents, ask
where the nego

consequences
as the University's be discussed.
uivalent to a 7.5 In the letter, Haddy says "Our
crease. graduate students find it hard to
ions, on Friday, 13 accept the administration's contract
culty members sent proposals, especially since they
versity chief nego - reflect a net reduction in pay.
olan-Greene endors- Under the new tax law, grants,
waiver for TAs - scholarships, and fellowships that
ntract demand. exceed tuition and related costs are
o sending letters to now taxable, as well as interest
king for a meeting payments on educational loans.

tiations issues can

I

Native Americans gather at Ann Arbor Pow Wow

(Continued from Page 1)
young generations the culture.
M "This is what we did before
Columbus came across," Little Elk
said.
NATIVE Americans of all ages
and tribes danced together in a
continuous circle. Participants
observed traditional celebrating,
singing, and costumes of many
tribes, while craftspeople sold
jewelry and art work. Dancing and
singing mainly preserve the culture.
Holly Powless, President of the
Native American Student Asso -

ciation and LSA junior said,
"Everyone comes here together to
have a good time, to eat, to meet
old and new friends, and to dance."
The Pow Wow is the asso -
ciation's biggest project. The
proceeds from the Pow Wow will
be used for the next Pow Wow.
On Saturday, the Pow Wow
began with the Grand Entry, a
ritualistic dance to celebrate and
commemorate Native American
veterans. The dance was led by three
veterans in ornate, traditional
costumes of bright colors and

feathers. The men held a Canadian
flag, an American flag, and a Native
American flag, a staff made of cloth
and eagle feathers.
Many addressed the problems
faced by Native American students
at the University.
"We are =underrepresented in

terms of support staff. It has an
adverse effect on the retention rate
and recruitment of Native Ameri -
cans. We want more Indian oriented
programs to focus on Indian issues
and cultural presentations," said
Powless.
-Staff member Marie Wesaw
contributed to this story.

UM News in
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