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April 06, 1987 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-06

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5

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, April 6, 1987
Football team told to keep quiet IN BRIEF
)1grdninom( Compiled from Associated Press reports

The University also provides
more funding for athletic scholar -
ships than academic scholarships.
Of the 594 athletes, 250 have
scholarships, said Athletic Depart-
ment Administrative Assistant Pat
Perry. The budget for scholarships
is about $2.4' million, with an
average of $9,600 per scholarship
athlete. The athletic department
gives the maximum number of
scholarships allowed by the NCAA.
The University is spending $9.5
million this year on gift-aid scho -
larships for approximately 4,500
students, averaging $2,111 for each
student receiving gift aid. The
figure does not include federal or
private scholarship sources.
Several black athletes contacted
said athletes are unfairly receiving

criticism as a result of statements
such as Jackson's.
"(People) are saying that if
coaches can recruit black athletes,
then they can also recruit black
scientists and whatever. But the
purpose is to get good athletes
regardless of their color," said
Leslie Spicer, a first-year student on
the women's basketball team.
The University community "is
giving black athletes a bad rap," she
added. Spicer attended the Jackson
speech, but not any of the other
functions sponsored by Black
Action Movement III (BAM III) or
United Coalition Against Racism
(UCAR).
MARK Hughes, a sophomore
on the men's basketball team, said,
"Athletes are recruited because they

have a special talent."
Hughes, who attended both the
Jackson speech and rallies, added
that the University could do more
to recruit black non-athletes, and
said the racist incidents "are totally
crazy. I can't believe an institution
of higher education such as this can
have such ignorant things happen -
ing. Something has to be done."
Although some athletes freely
discuss racism on campus and
criticize the University, it seems
football players are under an order
of silence, imposed by their
coaches. One football player, who
asked to be unnamed, said the
coaches told the team not to talk
about the recent racial events on
campus. Several other football
players said they could not
comment on recent racial problems,
and refused to answer further
questions.
Michigan football coach Bo
Schembechler did not return numer -
ous phone calls made to his office.
Assistant football coaches said
they were unaware of any specific
ban on speaking about the racist
incidents. Coach Gary Moeller said,
however, "We (the football team)
try to keep- our problems to
ourselves... If things are
controversial we try not to get into

PEER INFORMATION
COUNSELING
Offers Minority students and student groups:
-personalized research assistance
-library tours and lectures
-word processing training
CONTACT: DARLENE NICHOLS AT: 764-4479

them. This is no different than any
other issue, really."
COACH Fritz Seyferth said,
"They have to be very careful in
what they say because things often
get taken out of context, and what
they say and what gets printed on
the page may be very different.
They don't know anymore than any
other students, but often they are
the ones who end up getting
quoted."
BAM III member Barron
Wallace, a law student, saidrthe
football staff's alleged ban is just
one example of the University
isolating athletes.
"It's indicative of the situation
here, where the coaches have some
kind of plantation mentality... With
that kind of arrogant and
paternalistic attitude you can under -
stand the athletes' reluctance to
comment. It's a grossly unfair
system when these players are
having scholarships held over their
heads.
"The coaches, more than
anybody else, are perpetuating
institutionalized racism," Wallace
said.
University Athletic Director Don
Canham said the University's
coaches do not have a "plantation
mentality" nor are they perpetuating
-racism.
"That's absolute nonsense. Our
coaching staff is probably more
sympathetic to the inner-city kids'
plight than anyone in the country,"
Canham said.
Official: KGB
bugged embassy
WASHINGTON (AP) - The new
$191 million U.S. Embassy in
Moscow is riddled with hidden KGB
listening devices, will never be
secure and should be torn down and
replaced at Soviet cost, the former
vice chairman of the Senate intel-
ligence committee said yesterday.

JI,
..L""

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDERGRADUATE
LIBRARY

x

Department of Communication presents:
"HOW GOOD IS NETWORK TV
AT CRITICIZING ITSELF?"
lecture by
JEFF GREENFIELD
ABC's Media Correspondent and
Ted Kopel's Number Two on Nightline

Imagine summer '87
by our pool!
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our heated swimming pool.LiLve close to campus in one of
our newly refurnished apartments with cool air.
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our suammer rates are cvery easonable:
UN! VERSM YTOWERS
536S, Forest (corner of S. Forest & sUniversiy)
Visit our model apartments today! Phone: (31376172680

Reagan, Mulroney to confer
OTTAWA - President Reagan arrived in Ottawa yesterday for
meetings with Prime Minister Brian Mulroney at a summit where the
two leaders' political problems provided a backdrop to nagging dif -
ferences on trade and acid rain pollution.
Both sides said in advance that no agreements or joint statements
would be produced during Reagan's 24-hour visit.
The Canadians billed the summit as "an inconclusive working ses -
sion." the Americans called it a summit "without drama - a lot of
workmanlike, businesslike sessions to look at te agenda."
At Parliament Hill, a short distance from the airport, where Air
Force One touched down, more than 5,000 demonstrators gathered with
banners and balloons to protest Reagan's visit. The protestors com -
plained about the Canada-U.S. free-trade talks, acid rain, and Reagan's
Central America policy.
Pope backs Chilean workers
CONCEPCION, Chile - Pope John Paul II told more than
200,000 people at a Mass in this economically depressed region yes -
terday that he supports their calls for more jobs and higher pay.
His visit to Chile was finally free from the violent anti-government
demonstrations that plagued papal appearances since his arrival Wed -
nesday.
"You may think the pope is not aware of the preoccupations of
workers in this beloved Chile," said the pontiff.
"That is not so. I know very well your concern about social jus -
tice...onemployment...wages...and legitimate union demands," he said.
In Santiago, the capital, opponents of President Augusto Pinochet's
18-year-old right wing military regime provoked clashes with the police
during Papal events from Wednesday through Friday. The violence left
more than 260 people injured.
Cuba frees political prisoners
WASHINGTON - Cuba has allowed 20 former long-term political
prisoners to emigrate to the United States in the past 10 weeks, sending
them at the rate of two a week in an apparent attempt to avoid publicity,
according to U.S. officials.
The officials said the piecemeal approach appeared aimed at elim -
inating the tumultuous receptions that have accompanied large-scale pri -
soner releases in the past and have receiyed extensive media attehtion.
All20 Cubans were released from prison last May following a per -
sonal appeal to President Fidel Castro by French undersea explorer
Jacques Cousteau who visited Cuba in late 1985.
The officials, who requested anonymity, said an additional 59 former
prisoners have been authorized by the U.S. to emigrate and are now a -
waiting permission from their government to leave along with close ret -
atives. Cuban authorities have indicated that the group will be allowed to
emigrate.
U.N. won't release Nazi files
UNITED NATIONS - 8,000 sealed files containing a wealth of de -
tail on Nazi war criminals and their war crimes have become a focus of
controversy over whether they should be opened to Israel and to Hol
ocaust scholars.
The sealed U.N. files list the names of 36,000 Nazi war criminals,
suspects and witnesses and background on the workings of the Nazi exter -
mination machinery.
The name that sparked the current controversy was an obscure ex-first
lieutenant in Hitler's Wehrmacht - Kurt Waldheim. In postwar years, he
rose to become Austrian foreign minister, U.N. secretary-general and, ul
timately, president of Austria. ot
EXTRAS
Acupuncture on the farm
COOPERSVILLE, Mich. - How badly does an animal need a hole
in the head?
Expertssay more veterinarians are using acupuncture to treat,
anesthetize, and even diagnose animals, although it is used relatively
rarely to treat humans in the United States. Acupuncture proponents say
it is gaining almost mainstream acceptance among animal doctors.
"People see now that it it isn't voodoo, that there are things you can
accomplish with acupuncture that you can't accomplish with traditional
treatments," said Meredith Snader, a Chester Springs, Pa., veterinarian
and executive director of the International Veterinary Acupuncture'
Society.
The 44,000-member American Veterinary Medical Association,
which for years has viewed acupuncture as an experimental treatment,
soon may make a fundamental change. An AVMA committee on
alternative therapies in February issued a statement recognizing,
acupuncture and acutherapy as valid medical procedures, said Bruce.
Little, assistant executive vice president of the group
"I think acupuncture is becoming and will become more and more
acceptable throughout the profession," Little said.
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.

P Mirbigan BMWl
Vol. XCVII-No. 127
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One
term-$10 in town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub
scribes to Pacific News Service and the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

RACKHAM
AUDITORIUM

MONDAY, APRIL 6
3:00 pm

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ADVANTAGE

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UNION
ARTS & PROGRAMMING
This week in the Michigan Union
April 6-9
Elegant Passage cotton clothing sale
Michigan Union, ground floor
10 a.m.-S p.m.
April 9
Arts at midday:
U of M Flint chamber singers, Carolyn Mawby,
conductor.
12:15
Pendleton Room
April 7
Concert of the month
Early Italian music of Bach, Couperin,
Corelli and others performed by Robert
Utterback, harpsicord; Victoria Norfleet
and Keith Graves, Baroque violin, and
Deborah Lonergan, Baroque Cello.
8:00 pn .
Pendleton Room

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4

Editor in Chief................................ROB EARLE
Managing Editor..........................AMY MINDELL
News Editor...................:..........PHILIP I. LEVY
Features Editor.....................MELISSA BIRKS
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Eve Becker, Steve
Blonder, Rebecca Blumenstein, Jien Bray, Brian Bonet,
Dov Cohen, Rebecca Cox, Hampton Dellinger, Martin
Frank, Pam Franklin, Stephen Gregory, Edward
Kleine, Steve Knopper, Vibeke Laxoi, Carrie Loranger,
Michael Lustig, Melissa Lustigman, Jerry Markon,
Andy Mills, Tim Omarzu, Eugene Pak, Melissa
Rarmsdell, Kristen Salathiel, Martha Sevetson, Wendy
Sharp, Louis Stancato, Steven Tuch, David Webster,
Rose Mary Wuunri
Opinion Page Editors..................PETER MOONEY
HENRY PARK
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Muzammil Ahmed, Tim
Bennett, Paul Honsinger, Tim lluet, Lisa Jordan,
Jeffrey Rutherford, Caleb Southworth, Arlin
Wasserman, Mark Williams.
Arts Editors..........................REBECCA CHUNG
SETH FLICKER
Books.. .........SUZANNE MISENCIK
Features ........................ALAN PAUL
Film..................................KURT SERBUS
Music..................................BETH FERTIG
Theatre......................LAUREN SCHREIBER
ARTS STAFF: V. J. Beauchamp, Lisa Berkowitz,
John Casson. Mamie Criley, Karin Edelson, Kaywin

Sports Editor......................SCOTT G. MILLER
Associate Sports Editors...............DARREN JASEY
RICK KAPLAN
GREG MOLO)N
ADAM OCIILIS
JEFF RU SH
SPORTS STAFF: Jim Downey, Liam Flaherty. Allen
Gelderloos, Kenneth Goldberg, Chris Gordillo, Shelly
Hasclhuhn, Julie Hollmarn, Walter Kopf, Rai, Levine,
Jill Marchiano, lan Ratner, Adam Schefter, Adam
Schrager, Scott Shaffer, Pete Steinert, Douglas Volan,
Peter Zellen, Bill Zolla.
Photo Editors...... ........SCOTT LITUCHY
ANDI SCIIREIBE"R
PHOTO STAFF: Leslie Boorstein, Karen Handelnan,
Dana Mendelssohn, John Munson, Darrian Smith,
Grace Tsai
Business Manager..................MASON FRANKLIN
Sales Manager..........................DIANE BLOOM
Finance Manager...............REBECCA LAWRENCE
Classified Manager....................GAYLE SIIAPIRO
Assistant Sales Manager...........ANNE KUBEK
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DISPLAY SALES: Karen Brown, Irit Elrad, Missy
Hambrick. Ginger Heyman, Denise Levy, Wendy
Lewis, Jodi Manchik, Laura Martin,.Mindy Mendonsa,
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Samovitz, Laura Schlanger, Jill Ilyse Shiner, Julie

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