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April 03, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily -- Friday, April 3, 1987 - Page 5

Mojo RA criticizes racist fliers

By EUGENE PAK
A Mosher Jordan resident has a personal stake in
anti-racist demonstrations around campus: in the
course of one week, two racist fliers have been
slipped under his door. He wants the still unknown
perpetrator removed from the dorm.
"I didn't want this guy to sit back and laugh
while we're out holding rallies and marches against
racism," said John Simms, a Mosher Jordan resident
advisor and LSA junior.
The first flier, in form of a poem, was slipped
under Simms' door last Monday while he was
attending the Rev. Jesse Jackson's speech. The sec -
ond one, also a poem, was put under his door early
Friday morning while Simms was asleep.
SIMMS said the perpetrator must have known
when he was asleep or out of his room. He spec -
ulated that the fliers' author may be the same person
who threatened him with racist telephone calls
earlier in the year.
The second poem refers to the first one; part of it
reads, "Did you think we forgot?/ We hope "knot."
Simms said this alludes to the threat of hanging in
the first poem. The first flier tells all Blacks to
move to Africa, and said whites would watch as

black students are hung, Simms said.
Initially, Simms did not want others to know he
received the "poems," but changed his mind.
"I didn't want him sitting back in his room
laughing - that thought irritates me," he said.
"I didn't want everyone on staff being bothered
by the situation, especially with finals and staff
selection coming up," Simms said. Eventually, he
said, some people found out. Simms said he is
friendly with most people in the dorm and cannot
imagine anyone going to this length to harass him.
"If I could meet this guy, I'd like to first explain
to him that I'm no different than he is. I have the
same feelings, needs, desires.
"I'm not out to do anything to him, I'm out to
get an education so I can get a job in the future."
SIMM S said he reported the incidents to
housing officials. Director of Housing Security Joel
Allan refused to comment on the investigation.
Mosher Jordan building director Patti Duch
distributed a statement to residents last week war-
ning them about the University's policies against
racist and sexist harassment.
Simms said the Mosher Jordan staff and students
have been helpful.

L 3

B.F.A. students
show art work

Il

At 2 am. Sunday, April 5, most
of the nation will switch to
daylight saving time by moving
clocks ahead one hour.

1

r

AP/Pat Lyon
Sun savings
Don't forget! It's spring again
and time to start saving daylight.
Longer, lighter days mean more
time to play! So remember to
turn the clocks ahead an hour
Sunday, April 5, at 2 a.m.

By LAUREN SHAPIRO and
CHARLES OESTREICHER
The first of the two fine arts
degree shows opening this weekend
is at Jean Paul Slusser Gallery at
the School of Art and marks the
graduation of six B.F.A. candidates.
The artists are diverse and clever,
each one talented in a variety of
media.
Scott Withers is primarily an
interior designer, and his layouts for
a department store, bank and resort
provide unique interpretations of
familiar architectural themes.
Monique Struthers' collection is a
low key but effective group of
silkscreen prints, photography and
metalwork.
Rob Sula's "Figures:1,2,3" is a
dynamic three part series of dark,
depressing scenes and skeletal
figures. Portia Hampton's best
piece is her photo series combining
symboic images with poetry.
Eileen Carey's photo portraits
combine disparate elements with
strange characters to produce mys -
erious yet funny pictures. And
Karen Gorton's work is also
photographic, with "human" land -
scapes that don't actually contain
any people.
The strongest impression given
off by this show is one of under -
statement. While these talented

artists are not radical, they deal with
images and issues on theirown
terms in a quiet but effective way.
Six at the Crossing is the
B.F.A. Exhibit opening at Rack -
ham Galleries. Colleen McCann
and Judit Hersko share the first
exhibit room. Their works blend
together melodically through na -
tural, subtle images. McCann, a
scientific illustrator, gives vivid
views into the world of nature
through her charcoal, pencil, and
watercolor works. Hersko's softly
rounded sculptures compliment her
work.
David Lovinger and Jackie Hoats
combine beautifully designed land -,
scapes with muscular sculptures.
Lovinger's well defined sculpures.
flow with the lines and curves-in'
Hoats' arb landscapes. In the final
exhibit room, Sommer uses warm
photographs of children to balance
the anxiety and futuristic works of*
Jeff Sherven, who generates ideas
through a laser printer with basic
patterns, shapes and forms, using
various materials and then ques t-
tioning their actual function.
Six at the Crossing formally
opens with a bang tomorrow night
from 7 until 9 p.m. and continues:
through April 6.

UCAR seeks support
,(Continuedfrom Page 3),was a leader and for all people, not
LSA Dean of Long Range Plan - just Blacks, and should be honored
ning Jack Meiland said a mandated as such.
course would require faculty ap - .Institution of a program of
proval. tuition waivers for all under -
-Pull observance of the Dr. represented and economically dis -
Martin Luther King holiday inclu - advantaged minority students until
ding cancellation of classes and the the goals for minority enrollment
closing of offices. are realized.
University administrators have Financial Aid Director Harvey
argued that if this were done, other Grotrian said University contri -
groups would ask that other holi- bution to in-state student financial
days be honored in the same way, aid packages is one of the best in
and this is a regental decision.
UCAR members counter that King
fne apparel
in natural fbes
325 E iberty 995-4222

for unmet demands

the state.
-Creation of a Financial Aid
Appeals Board to make sure no stu -
dent is forced out of the University
because of economic discrimi -
nation.

meet in a comfortable and sup -
portive atmosphere on a regular
basis.
Michigan Union Director Frank
Cianciola was unavailable for com -
ment.

Grotrian said students can appeal
to their financial aid counselor or UCAR members will solicit
make a request for an exception to signatures from several campus
the financial aid case committee. areas including the Fishbowl and
-Creation of a Minority Student residence halls. They will also
Lounge and Office in the Michigan distribute black armbands to stu -
Union where minority students can dents.

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