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April 03, 1987 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-03

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I

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 3, 1987

Pierce
seeks
second
term as
mayor

BUY 2
"vote
715 N.Uni
761-CHIP

(Continued from Page 1),
business community, despite pledg -
ing in his 1985 campaign literature
to "actively pursue economic
development."
"I don't even think Pierce has
had any relationship with the
business community," said David
Shipman, a real estate developer and
member of the Ann Arbor Chamber
of Commerce's Board of Directors.
He said Pierce has not worked with
the chamber or the Washtenaw
Development Council to attract
new business to Ann Arbor.
Although Pierce has taken an
active role in overseeing some city
OOKiES
S FOR $1.00!
0 p.m.
es in Ann Arbor"
COUPON MUST BE
PRESENTED WITH PURCHASE*
OPEN DAILY
9:304a.m. - 11:00 p.m.

departments, his 1985 promise to
review and audit City Hall
operations was begun by council
only last month. Council must
now appoint an outside consultant
to conduct the review, which should
take several months.
PIERCE'S Democratic city
council colleagues praise him as a
strong leader with diverse political
experience. Pierce's leadership
style, they say, is more suited to
supporting their own initiatives
than proposing new ones.
"Ed is not initiating things
because his council colleagues are,"
Epton said. "The mayor is in a

m-

position where he has to do
summary work - guiding the
efforts of other people."
"I feel really supported and
strengthened by Ed," Epton said.
"He brings a stability, perspective,
and experience that most people
don't have."
According to Edgren, Pierce
initially had trouble running coun-
cil meetings and balancing
conflicting opinions within the
Democratic caucus. But in the last
year, Edgren said, Pierce has
developed a very effective "fatherly
leadership style."

Outreach visits end

V

1;

pC
COOKIE
after 9:0
d best cooki

iversity

C OORDINATOR POSITION
AVAILABLE
: Book Musicians
" Produce Concerts
* Work with
legendary and
upcoming
jazz musicians
Eclipse Jazz offers this unique opportunity. We are now
taking applications for the position of coordinator. This is a
volunteer position but the experience is invaluable (many
Eclipse coordinators now have successful careers in the en-
tertainment industry). Interactive abilities, leadership skills,
and some knowledge of jazz are important. Applications are
available in Rm. 4308 or 1310 of the Michigan Union.
For more information call 763-0046
Be Our Guest
at The University of Michigan-Dearborn
Students in good academic standing are invited to take
advantage of spring and summer by enrolling in course-
work at our easily-accessible campus. We offer
University of Michigan credit through a full array of
day and evening classes.

(Continued from Page 1)
Spanish and English and helped
them develop a newsletter.
Six Project Community stu-
dents involved in the Creative
Writing Workshop worked in a
back room of the prison library
with seven inmates. According to
Benjamin Schneider, Residential
College freshman, "We were alone
- just students and prisoners. The
guard would look in every half
hour. I never thought about it when
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St. (between State & Division)
Sundays: 9:55 worship; 11:25 Bible
Study groups for both Undergrads and
Graduate Students.
Wednesdays: 5:30 Supper (free) and
Fellowship.
CENTER OPEN EACH DAY
for information call 663-9376
ROBERT B. WALLACE, PASTOR
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.- 6624466
(between Hill and S. University St.)
William Hillegonds, Senior Minister
Sunday Worship Servbices at 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
UNIVERSITY MINISTRY
J. B.Notkin, University Minister
University Seminar: Galations
11:00a.m., French Room.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave., 663-5560
(Between Hill and South University)
Edward Krauss, Pastor
Wednesday Lenten Services, 7:30 p.m.
Communion Services at 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.

I was there but I wouldn't feel safe
anymore."
"I wouldn't want to go back; I
would be scared to go back," said
Grant Greenberg, an LSA senior
and coordinator of the Creative
Writing Workshop.
STUDENTS spent two hours
a week working with prisoners, but
now only continue their weekly on-
campus discussion session. Stu-
dents receive two credits.
Andrew Weinstein, an LSA
senior, like other members of the
Creative Writing Workshop, said he
would not want to return to the
prison. "This incident brought back
reality. We were very sympathetic;
they showed us pictures of their
children. We lost touch with the
fact that they were prisoners," he
said.
But LSA sophomore and
HASTA worker Elsa Barboza said
"If we were allowed to go back we
still would."
"With HASTA around us, we
felt really protected. They wanted.
our help and they considered it a
real privilege for us to be there,"
said Linda Reno, LSA senior.
Rachel Pooley, an LSA junior,
said working with the prisoners was
rewarding. "When someone shakes
your hand goodbye four times, you
know they really want you there."
H A S T A prisoners were
planning a party for the Project
Community group and had invited
them to their annual banquet in
May. Now, "Everything is left
hanging," Reno said.
According to Barboza, the group
plans to write a letter of support to
HAS TA at the prison.
Members of the Creative Wri-
ting Workshop said the prisoners
wrote philisophically, concen-
trating on racism, justice, and
equality.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
Moslem kidnappers release
tape of U.S. hostage Turner
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Moslem kidnappers released yesterday a
videotape showing U.S. hostage Jesse Turner saying his abductors were
determined to trade him and three other educators for 400 Arab prisoners'
in Israel.
Turner, 39, of Boise, Idaho,.said Islamic Jihad for the Liberation of
Palestine was "firm in its demand" that a swap be arranged. The group
had claimed responsibility for the Jan. 24 abduction of the four.
But his voice was barely audible in the poor quality, three-minute
tape, which was delivered to the independent Beirut newspaper An-
Nahar.
Senate passes highway bill
WASHINGTON - The Senate approved an $88 billion
transportation bill yesterday that frees up $312 million a year in
highway aid for Michigan and lets states decide whether to increase
speed limits to 65 mph on rural interstates.
The Senate gave the five-year financing bill final approval on the 67-
33 vote to override a veto by President' Reagan, with both oft
Michigan's Democratic senators, Donald Riegle and Carl Levin,
supporting the override.
Final approval of the legislation was welcome news to the state
Transportation Department, which had been awaiting overdue federal aid
for the spring construction season just getting under way.
The DOT's Susan Wenzlick said state officials issued short-term
bonds earlier yesterday to allow them to proceed with planned roadwork,
but now would be able to promptly pay off those bonds.
U.S. soldier and W. German
wife defect to Soviet Union
MOSCOW - The Kremlin announced yesterday an American
soldier and his West German wife had defected to the Soviet Union and
been granted asylum because they feared political persecution.
The U.S. Army in West Germany and the Pentagon in Washington
could not confirm the defection, which would be the first by an
American serviceman to the Soviet Union since the Vietnam War.
The Pentagon issued a statement, however, saying it was
investigating an enlisted man with a name similar to that announced by-
the Soviets who had deserted in West Germany a month ago. It said it
was not certain if he was the same person.
Chilian slum-dwellers
welcome Pope John Paul
SANTIAGO, Chile - Slum dwellers thronged to welcome Pope
John Paul II yesterday but stoned the police who escorted him. Some.
shared his podium to accuse Chile's military regime of torture, murder
and causing their poverty.
Before setting out for La Bandera shantytown, John Paul spent
nearly 45 minutes with President August Pinochet, who the pontiff has.
said runs a "dictatorial" government. Vatican sources described the
meeting as courteous but would not reveal details.
Protesters smashed all the windows of two police buses that led the
Pope on a crisp, brilliant autumn morning to the squalid slum whose
90,000 people are plagued by drug addiction, prostitution and grinding
poverty.

14

I

4

11

Spring/Summer Term.
Registration
Term Length
Spring Half-Term
Registration
Term Length
Summer Half-Term
Registration
Term Length

DANIS
EVENTS
IN
ANN
ARBOR
Ap ' 9' 'April12 197
Danish Pianist
NANNA
HANSEN
Friday, April 10,
8 pm
Kerrytown Concert House
415 North Fourth Avenue,
Ann Arbor
Tickets available for $8, $6 for students
and senior citizens. A wine reception
andDanish open sandwiches following
the concert are included.
For reservations,
please call 769-2999

April 29-30
May 4-August 31
April 29-30
May 4-June 27
July 1-2
July 7-August 31

EXTRAS4
The legal danger of foul
language and dyed ducks
PONTIAC- Ever had one of those days when you feel like
shouting obscenities for a while?
Don't do it in front of your mother, sister, or female acquaintance.
It's against the law.
Still on the Michigan books is an 1846 law making it a
misdemeanor to "use any indecent, immoral, obscene, vulgar or.
insulting language in the presence or hearing of any woman or child..."'
. And if you're so rythm-impaired you think the national anthem has a
good beat and is great to dance to, you're out of luck in more than the
obvious way. Michigan law not only prohibits its playing as a dance
number, but forbids its being played as a medley.
There are a few more laws you need to be wary of.
If you want to buy baby chicks, bunnies, or ducks for Easter dyed in
traditional pink or lavender colors, you'll have a tough time. It's d
misdemeanor to sell artificially dyed animals.
It's a misdemeanor to distribute or post liquor ads that refer, either
through picture, quotations, or scenes to the lives of deceased U.S.
presidents.
It's against the law to let your dog, cat, or chicken run loose in a
cemetery.
0 he Mtchjoa Unfl
Vol. XCVII -No.~126
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One
term-$10 in town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub -
scribes to Pacific News Service and the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

See your registrar or call the Office of Admissions at
(313) 593-5100 for a guest application and tuition
information.

Ufl

The University of Michigan-Dearborn is an affirmative
action/non-discriminatory institution.

S__ __ _ _ _

15th ANNUAL
ANN ARBOR POW WOW
A NATIVE AMERICAN CELEBRATION OF
SONG AND DANCE

4,4;

POW WOW

The Native American Student Association and Minority Student Services
are co-sponsoring the 15th Annual Ann Arbor POW WOW. This event
has traditionally hosted the largest "coming together" of Native Ameri-
can dancers and singers in the State of Michigan. Many Indian artisans
and craftsmen will be displaying and selling authentic Native American
merchandise. Come share the experience.

Editor in Chief................ROB EARLE
Managing Editor..........................AMY MINDELL
News Editor..............................PHILIP I. LEVY
Features Editor..........................MELISSA BIRKS
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Eve Becker, Steve
Blonder; Rebecca Bluenstein Jim Bray. Brian Bonet,
Dov Cohen, Rebecca Cox, Hamnpton Dellinger, Martin
Frank, Pam Franklin, Stephen Gregory, Edward
Kleine, Steve Knoppo, Vibeke Laroi, Carrie Loranger,
Michael Lustig, Melissa Lustigman, Jerry Markon,
Andy Mills, Tim Omarzu, Eugene Pak, Melissa
Ramsdell, Kristen Salathiel, Martha Sevetson. Wendy
Sharp, Louis Stancato, Steven Tuch, David Webster,
Rose Mary Wumniel
Opinion Page Editors.................PETER MOONEY
HENRY PARK
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Muzammil Ahned, Tim
Bennett, Paul Honsinger, Tim Huet, Lisa Jordan,
Jeffrey Rutherford, Caleb Southworth, Arlin
Wasserman, Mark Williams.
Arts Editors..........................REBECCA CHUNG
SETH FLICKER
Books.......................SUZANNE MISENCIK
Features.................................ALAN PAUL
Film..................................KURT SERBUS
Music..................................BETH FERTIG
Theatre......................LAUREN SCHREIBER
AiRTS STAFF V . .eauchamn L saerknwitz.

Sports Editor.........................SCOTT G. MILLER
Associate Sports Editors...............DARREN JASEY
RICK KAPLAN
GREG MOLZON
ADAM OCHLIS
JEFF RUSH
SPORTS STAFF: Jim Downey, LiamFlaherty, Allen
Gelderloos, Kenneth Goldberg, Chris Gordillo, Shelly
Haselhuhn, Julie Hollman, Walter Kopf, Rob Levine,
Jill Marchiano, Ian Ratner, Adam Schefter, Adam
Schrager, Scott Shaffer, Pete Steinert, Douglas Volan,
Peter Zelen, Bill Zolla.
Photo Editors...........................SCOTT LITUCHY
ANDI SCHREIBER
PHOTO STAFF: Leslie Boorstem. Karen HandelRan,
Dana Mendelssohn, John Munson, Darrian Smith.
Grace Tsai
Business Manager..................MASON FRANKLIN
Sales Manager.............................DIANE BLOOM
Finane Manager.........REBECCA LAWRENCE
Classified Manager .............GAYLE SHAPIRO
Assistant Sales Manager..................ANNE KUBEK
Assistant Classified Manager................AMY EIGES
DISPLAY SALES: Karen Brown, Irit Elrad, Missy
Hambrick, Ginger Heyman. Denise Levy, Wendy
Lewis, Jodi Manchik, Laura Martin, Mindy Mendonsa,
Scott Metcalf. Carolyn Rands. Jackie Rosenbura. Todd

Date:
Place:

Sat., April 4, Grand Entry 1:00 and 7:00 pm
Sun., April 5, Grand Entry 1:00 pm
Coliseum, corner of Hill Street and Fifth Ave.

s$$.00 L

Admission: Adults $5.00/day, Children $2.00/day; Weekend Pas
All .',,,, t .,d mI. n t tu ent If

i

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