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April 01, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Coleman and Witchie
vie for Ward One seat

By CARRIE LORANGER
Ann Arbor's First Ward has been
dominated by Democrats since its
creation in the early 1980's. If this
voting trend continues, Democrat
Ain Marie Coleman will win a city
council seat on April 6th.
Candidates in the First Ward are
concerned with increasing crime
rates and creating affordable
housing.
Republican candidate Ronald
Witchie, a environmental technician
with Chester Engineers, and
Coleman, a campus minister at the
Guild House, differ on ways to
solve these problems.
Witchie recently told the
Chamber of Commerce that the city
needs more police officers to
combat the crime problem, but his
opponent said the city needs to
} better control its youth and institute
additional neighborhood watch
programs
Witchie also suggests a
departmental reorganization so
officers are not tied up with
administrative work, which hinders
patrol efforts.
Coleman does not support hiring
additional officers, although she
sees an alarming amount of
breaking and entering in the First
Ward.
"Neighborhood watch is an
appropriate way to deal with
breaking and entering," said

Coleman. "We need to watch out
for our neighbors; hiring more
police won't prevent breaking and
entering."
Police Chief William Corbett
requested 42 aditional officers before
the city council last month.
Coleman,han advocate of
affordable housing, said it is
important for people who work in
the area to be able to afford to live
here. She also said the University
should build more housing for
students.
Coleman favors Proposal B,
asking residents to vote on a tax
increase subsidizing builder's costs
for 400 low-cost housing units.
Witchie doesn't favor the
proposal. He said the city has many
housing projects planned or
underway and; if the millage passes,
it will further burden the majority
of citizens and raise the cost of
owning or renting a home.
He also criticized the lack of
planning for allocating the funds,
because he said there is no site plan
or contractor yet. The proposal calls
for the creation of a board to
oversee construction.
Coleman countered, "The.
Republicans have steadfastly refused
to read the copy on the housing
millage... The plan calls for a board
to administer the money."

Campbell,
By CARRIE LORANGER
Third Ward voters in next week's
city elections will have to choose
between two city council candidates
who disagree on almost every major
issue.
Republican Isaac-Jacobein
Campbell, a bank manager for First
of America and a member of the
Central America Sister City Task
Force, holds many conservative
views, while two-term incumbent
Jeff Epton is a Social Democrat
who initiates many of the projects
backed by his party.
Epton has been a popular coun-
cilmember, working with members
from both parties on low-income
housing projects and a pay equity
study to determine if there is

discrimination in the city's hiring
practices.
Epton supports the proposed
housing millage, which would
increase property taxes to generate
$4 million over the next five years.
These funds would be used to
subsidize building costs and make
houses cheaper, thereby preserving
the community, Epton said.
Campbell said he doesn't
support the millage because there
are no concrete plans for the funds.
"There is no builder, no site, and no
backing," said Campbell in a recent
appearance at the Forest Hills
Cooperative.
To tackle the city's rising crime
rate, Campbell backs Police .Chief

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, April 1, 1987 - Page 5
Epton differ in views

William Corbett's request to hire
more police, while Epton says were
are less expensive ways to curb city
crime.
Epton proposed hiring more park
rangers at nearly half the salary of a
police officer. Although rangers
can't make arrests, he said having
more of them on the lookout for
crime would aid crime prevention.
Campbell favors hiring more
police, saying that police cannot be
overworked if they are to be
effective. He said the police chief
is the best qualified to assess the
needs of the police department. "Let
the experts worry about how to run
their departments," said Campbell.

Campbell
... advocates more police

Joseph
(Continued from Page3
after spending three yea
Zealand as one
epidemiologists in the
While in New Zealand, s
the effects of migrat
Polynesia on risk factors
disease and health.
In Joseph's office
caricature, drawn for
medical illustrator in
Zealand medical centera
by her colleagues, of he
She began running whe
36-years-old and ran two
in New Zealand, before4
stop because of injuries.
Now looking younge

brings social gem
3) 42 years, Joseph is currently
rs in New training for the Ann Arbor-Dexter
of six half marathon in the spring.
country. Describing herself as politically
he studied "left of center," Joseph engages in
ion from many activities which would "build
s for heart a better world." She takes an active
part in the Ann Arbor Hunger
hangs a Coalition, which feeds between 60
her by a and 90 homeless people for each
the New meal.
and signed Joseph loves to cook. And
,r jogging. Montgomery, who shares an office
n she was with her, says she often comes to
marathons work to find a plate of home-baked
she had to muffins, bread, or cake from
Joseph.
r than her Joseph started her undergraduate

phalsis to
degree at Stanford Univers
dropped out after her seco
there, choosing to work at d
research assistant jo
California.

public
Sity, but She said
nd year realize that
different you want t
abs in doing, th4
available."

health
the experience made her
t "if at any point of life
to change what you are
ere are opportunities

VETERINARY MEDICINE:
AN OPTION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS
SCIENCE * MEDICINE * ANIMALS

fr jE~- q

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