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March 31, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ainting
fetches
$39.5
. .
LONDON (AP) - An
anonymous buyer yesterday paid
$39.85 million for Vincent Van
Gogh's "Sunflower," a dazzling
yellow work the artist once had
hoped to sell for $125. The price
was more than triple the record for
an auctioned painting.
The bid of 24.75 million
pounds, accepted by telephone,
came on the 134th anniversary of
the birth of the Dutch artist. Van
Gogh committed suicide in 1890 at
the age of 37, unable to sell his
paintings.
The price stunned the packed
saleroom at Christie's auction
house. Art buyers and enthusiasts
from around the world had gathered
there expecting a record, but not of
these proportions.
Christie's wouldn't disclose the
buyer's identity or even the country
the bid came from, but there were
rumors that the buyer was in Japan.
Christie's had sent the picture on a
tour of Tokyo, New York, and
Zurich.
"I am 99.9 percent certain it was
from Japan," said New York dealer
Jacob Baal-Teshuva, who watched
the auction.
"There are only 10 to 15 people
in the world, and the Getty
Museum, who can afford that kind
of money. It was a. fantastic price,
mind-boggling. Nobody expected it.
We thought the top might be 18
million pounds ($30 million)," he
said.
In Malibu, Calif., spokeswoman
Lori Starr of the J. Paul Getty
Museum said the museum was not
the purchaser.
After the sale, Christie's threw a
party with a cake decorated with a
replica of the painting to honor Van
Gogh.
The artist born March 30, 1853,
lived on handouts from his brother,
Theo, an art dealer who had said the
money was coming from sales of
the artist's work. Van Gogh killed
himself after he found Theo's home
stacked with his unsold paintings.

I

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 31, 1987 - Page 5
Protest
Gays begin awareness
week with Diag march

By ALYSSA LUSTIGMAN
Fifteen members of Lesbian and
Gay Rights on Campus
(LAGROC) began Gay and Lesbian
Awareness Week yesterday with a
demonstration on the Diag. Group
members said they were trying to
increase their visibility and raise
student support for gay rights.
Carol Wayman, an LSA senior
and group member, hopes the
awareness week will publicize the
existence of 3,500 gay students on
campus. "If people are surprised to
hear that fact, then it shows that
many gays are forced to hide the
fact that they are gay," Wayman
said.
LAGROC was regrouped two
months ago, in response to in-
creased harassments of gays. Way-
man said many University gays
have been "beaten up, or subjected
to anti-gay jokes in classes by both
students and professors." She added,
"There is no freedom of speech for
gays on this campus. Our flyers are
ripped down as soon as they are put
up, and we are subject to ridicule."
The group is also holding an

open house on the third floor of the
Union today,.a talent show tomor-
row, a rally on the Diag at noon
Thursday, and Blue Jean Day on
Friday.
On Blue Jean Day, members of
LAGROC would like people to
show their support for gay rights
by wearing jeans.
"Gays are as common as blue
jeans," said one protestor, who
wore a paper bag over his head and
asked to be unnamed. "I'm wearing
the bag symbolically for all of
those homosexuals that can't afford
to jeopardize their positions."
The group met with University
President Harold Shapiro last week
and presented a list of demands
promoting gay rights. They asked
the administration to remove lan-
guage they consider discriminatory
from the University logo and
bylaws, create a gay discussion
session during orientation, redis-
tribute minority peer advisors so
that 10 percent of them are gay, and
coordinate gay and lesbian groups
in dormitories.

Associated Press
Papal preparations
Vendors display posters and flags at the site where Pope John Paul II will deliver an open air Mass tomorrow.
The Pope is arriving in Montevideo, Uruguay today for the beginning of a two-week tour of Uruguay, Argen-
tina, and Chile.
Resarher says more
Blackis needed in sciences

Wayne population declines

KALAMAZOO (AP) - He was
captain of his college football team,
student body president, a summa
cum laude valedictorian, a Danforth
Fellow who earned a doctorate in
pharmacology at the University.
He has been a radio announcer, a
college professor, college admin-
istrator and college president. Since
1968, he has been awarded three
honorary degrees, two of them
doctors of law.
Currently, he is director of
Central Nervous System Diseases
Research at the Upjohn Co., a
position he earned after only seven
years with the Kalamazoo-based
pharmaceutical company.
Through all these successful

achievements as a black scientist in
what is a predominantly white
profession, Roy Hudson maintains
a grasp on what it's like for other
Blacks who are struggling for
success.
Hudson is keenly aware of the
disproportionately low number of
blacks with doctorates, with the
problems some black students face
at white colleges and universities.
And he is increasingly aware of a
rise in the number of incidents in a
nation that has marked 30 years of
civil rights advances. These racial
incidents, he asserts, are an
offspring of the Reagan
Administration's tacit approval of
racist behavior while slashing

federal programs aimed at helping
Blacks and low-income people close
the social gap.
"Unless society allows for some
catching up," said Hudson of
programs such as affirmative
action, "the system will replicate at
the status where it is already fixed."
President Reagan, he said, is not
a backer of affirmative action. And
the president's administration's
practices "have done a great deal to
reduce social consciousness," a
major factor in the rise oftovert
racial incidents in recent months.
"We tend to be law-abiding
people," Hudson said. "but if our
leaders even hint at easing the
social consciousness, we respond."

DETROIT (AP) - Four
Michigan counties were among the
areas of the nation showing the
greatest population loss from 1980-
86, Dun & Bradstreet Corp. said
Monday.
Ranking among the 15 counties
having the largest popluation

declines were Wayne, Saginaw,
Jackson, and Berrien counties, the
New York business information
company said.
No Michigan counties ranking
among the 15 nationally showing
the greatest popluation increases,
Dun & Bradstreet said.

Passover Meals
Passover runs from Tuesday, April 14 to Tuesday,
April 21. The first Seder is Monday, April 13 and the
second Seder is Tuesday, April 14. Hillel will serve
lunch and dinner each day of Passover. Reservations
and payment for Passover Meals are due by noon
Thursday, April 2 at Hillel, 1429 Hill Street. For more
information, call Hillel at 663-3336.
VETERINARY MEDICINE:
AN OPTION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Computer users find
Stasteless jokes on MTS

I

POLICE NOTES

(Continued from Page 1)
own."
Van Houweling compared the
item to books of tasteless jokes
which are commonly sold on
newsstands and in bookstores. He
said people are not forced to buy the
books and likewise are not forced to
participate in the "Bad Jokes" item.
The item is preceded by a
disclaimer from the author which
describes the type of jokes it

contains and warns people who may
be offended to avoid the item
entirely.
On Saturday morning Bakal put
a temporary freeze on item 118 so
that no more jokes could be added
until planners are able to review
complaints about "Bad Jokes" and
make a decision on its future. An
alternative item has been created in
the network for students who wish
to comment either favorably or
unfavorably about item 118.

Police Notes
Break-ins
Ann Arbor Police are inves-
tigating a Saturday morning break-
in on the 1300 block of South
University, according to Sgt. Jan
Suomala. He said a purse and its
contents were taken by an intruder

who entered the building through an
unlocked door.
The police are also investigating
a robbery on the 700 block of
South State Street that occurred
between 3 p.m. on Friday and 2
p.m. on Saturday. A turntable
valued at $175 was stolen
-by Steve Blonder

SCIENCE

" MEDICINE

* ANIMALS
.Jt1ERiN4
s'

} f
CENTER FOR
WESTERN EUROPEAN STUDIES

vERfNq'P
& A

i *,% c %,

,.

I.,-

I Are you between the ages of 18 and 24?

You may qualify for a fellowship to
PROJECT OTZMA
A YEAR OF LIVING, LEARNING AND WORKING
IN ISRAEL AT A COST TO YOU OF ONLY $75Q*
Meet with a representative from Otzma and learn about this
exciting program at an information meeting on
Tuesday, March 31st, 7 pm at Hillel, 1429 Hill Street
For more info, contact Hillel, 663-3336
In Michigan a project of the Jewish Welfare Federation of Detroit.
*Funded by the Jewish Welfare Federation and Jewish Agency for Israel.

THE DEADLINE FOR ALL SPRING
AND SUMMER STUDY ABROAD
PROGRAMS IS APRIL 1st.
Applications should be returned to:
5208 ANGELL HALL
747-3560

'.-.-.
A veterinarian can combine these interests to tailor a career selected from
a wide range of opportunities that include biomedical research, private
practice (including specialties), wildlife and zoo medicine, and more.
TO LEARN MORE, MEET A REPRESENTATIVE FROM
MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY'S
COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
Thursday, April 2 - 3 - 5 p.m.
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
Preprofessional Division
3200 Student Activities Building
TIME IS RUNNING OUT
- .FOR THE ANNUAL
COMPUTING CENTER
SURVEY!
Your chance to make yourself
heard about computing on
campus ends April 4th!
To run the survey, type SURVEY at the
"Which Host?" prompt on any
microcomputer connected to UMnet.
Directions are available at Campus
Computing Sites. Running the

~--+

7

Be Our Guest
at The University of Michigan-Dearborn
Students in good academic standing are invited to take
advantage of spring and summer by enrolling in course-
work at our easily accessible campus. We offer
University of Michigan credit through a full array of

Spend a Summer
in a Land of Miracles.
Our first was 5,000 years ago-
our latest, maybe 10 minutes ago.
You'll findyourself in a land of giants-
surrounded by their thoughts and their footsteps-
and have fun, too!
Summer programs for
High School and College Students-
Tennis/The Arts/Kibbutz/Touring!
Study/Archaeology Religious Programs
For more information, contact or write:
Beni Schwartz (313) 661-1000
Arich Blau (313) 994-0033 or
AZYF ISRAEL PROGRAM CENTER
515 Park Avenue, New York, 10022, (Between 59th and 60th Street)

day and evening classes.
Spring/Summer Term
Registration
Term Length
Spring Half-Term
Registration

April 29-30
May 4-August 31
April 29-30
Xffn- A T~ ,o.,'

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