100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 30, 1987 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION
1 9 8 7 C O L L E G E

A C H I E V E M E N T

A W A R D S

excel in mathematics and science.
However, Jonathan Feng, a Harvard
physics major and musician, adds a third
element to this combination: admin-
istrator. Feng is president of the highly
regarded Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra.
The oldest university orchestral en-
semble in the United States, the HRO is
entirely student run and receives no
University funds. As president, Feng is
ultimately responsible for scheduling,
publicity, directing annual competi-
tions, fundraising, and overseeing a
$100,000 budget. During its past three
summer tours, the HRO received critical
acclaim while touring the Soviet Union,
Western Europe, and the Far East. Feng's
motto: "A poorly managed orchestra
sounds like one."
Feng's strong interests in math and
physics are steering him away from a
career in musical performance, but he
feels confident that he will always be
involved with music, if only as a con-
certgoer. "Without music," he insists,
"something would be missing in my life."
ERIC GAIDOS
CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY
Eric Gaidos was always doodling space-
ships on his homework papers. As it
turns out, those doodles are the forerun-
ners of spacecraft that may land on Mars
someday. Now an applied physics major
at Caltech, Gaidos is doing a lot more
than doodling. He's organizing un-
dergraduate activities within Caltech's
Mars Study Group in the Jet Propulsion
Laboratory. Gaidos recently designed a
boost-guide vehicle to be used someday
as a cargo transport in support of a
manned base on the surface of Mars.
Gaidos knows that a manned flight to
Mars is probably decades away, and that
it will be prefaced by a rigorous, auto-
mated exploration phase. That's why he's
actively involved at Edwards Air Force
Base, testing his research team's pro-
posal-instrument-carrying balloons
that can help put a manned base on
Mars.
Gaidos is considering NASA's
astronaut training program, while revel-
ing in the technical experience and

debate on this university campus. Stu-
dents are talking once again about issues
other than what's going on in Carolina
basketball!"
Hassel sums up his success in student
government: motivating others to work,
continually evaluating and reviewing,
and maintaining a clear vision of the big
picture.

training he's getting at Caltech. Asked to
sum it all up, he'll tell you, "All of this is
just great fun!"
DRYAN HASSE
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH
CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL
Bryan Hassel is one of those rare student
government officials who actually gets
important things done-quietly and
effectively. The first sophomore ever
elected president of the student body at
Chapel Hill, Hassel's resume is a list of
meaningful achievements since taking
office: the first student credit union, a
new minority recruitment program, a
tutorials-for-credit program, a grievance
task force, and a successful anti-tuition-
hike lobbying campaign. Meanwhile, he
maintains a normal class load and is a Phi
Beta Kappa.
A hands-on, highly visible, but soft-
spoken president, Hassel is praised by
faculty and students for bringing en-
thusiasm and concern for others to the
college campus: "Bryan has helped to
introduce a new level of intellectual

GRANT JONES
DENISON UNIVERSITY
While TIME's College Achievement
Awards seek to recognize a student's ex-
cellence in a particular field, it's impossi-
ble to ignore the fact that many students
simply excel in more than one area.
Grant Jones is one such individual.
Jones is a 3.98 pre-med biology major
at Denison; he has also lettered in varsity
football for three years running. He
helped lead Denison's football team to a
combined record of 27-3, including two
conference championships and two final
national rankings. What does this kind
of double achievement mean?
For Jones, it means practicing for the
NCAA Division III Playoffs while com-
pleting physical and family medicine in-
ternships at Ohio State and publishing
an article on gene therapy in the Denison
Journal of Biological Science.
As a possible role model, Jones cites
John Franke of the San Francisco Forty-
Niners, who plays professional football
and attends medical school simul-
taneously. In the meantime, Jones
frankly and refreshingly admits he enjoys
public recognition of his achievements.
ANDY JACODITl
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
Andy Jacobitz grew up on a farm in
central Nebraska, a state where the
economy is almost totally based on
agriculture. In a time when many stu-
dents of Jacobitz's background and
scholarship are turning away from farm-
ing, Jacobitz is committed to helping the
troubled farm economy and creating new
opportunities for agriculture in his home
state.

1

4

4

4

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan