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March 30, 1987 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION
1 9 8 7 C O L L E G E

A C H I E V E M E N T

A W A R D S

As state chairman of the Nebraska
Council of Youth, Jacobitz plays a lead-
ing role in tackling issues facing
Nebraska youth, from teenage pregnan-
cy to the farm crisis. He says a major
problem among Nebraska youth is guilt
about leaving home to attend college,
while their families suffer from financial
stress. Issues like these are taken up in
council discussion groups.
"If I ever left the state," Jacobitz
claims, "it would be to work on
agricultural problems that, when solved,
would help Nebraska. My roots are
here."
WILIAM KINCAID
YALE UNIVERSITY
Arriving at Yale from Fayetteville,
Arkansas, Bill Kincaid jumped into
community service in New Haven as if
he'd lived there all his life. To Kincaid,
community service is everything. He
says he puts his energies to use "on both
the political and the basic services
levels."
Kincaid has been actively involved in
voter registration and campaign volun-
teer work in local, senatorial, and guber-
natorial elections. He's also a math and
reading tutor at an inner-city New
Haven school. At Yale, Kincaid is a
member of the Yale Hunger Action Proj-
ect, and he's president of the Yale Col-
lege Democrats.
"This fall," he notes, "the College
Democrats helped at least 85 students
take part in local and state campaigns; I
believe that tasting what political in-
volvement is like as undergraduates will
make these students more likely to take
an active role in public affairs later on."
ARTHUR KDA
KALAMAZOO COLLEGE
Arthur Kudla is a chemistry and
biology double major whose achieve-
ments are revealed in the laboratory, in
the area of toxicological research.
Kudla's interest in toxicity stems from his
concern with the environment.
Throughout high school, Kudla con-

American Studies major and the 1986
Truman Scholar from Iowa, Mander-
scheid has already been exposed to a va-
riety of political venues.
Having served as page to the speaker
of the Iowa House of Representatives, he
spent the fall of 1986 in London as an
assistant to a member of Parliament and
a member of the North Atlantic Assem-
bly (NAA). During his tenure in the
House of Commons, Manderscheid
managed to contribute material to
"Alliance Political Developments" and
"Terrorism," two reports to the NAA.
He also wrote a special update on Syria
for a general report on terrorism. In addi-
tion, he condensed a 30,000 word terror-
ism report for publication in the
venerable Jane's Defence Weekly.
Manderscheid is spending the current
semester in Washington as legislative
researcher for Senator Tom Harkin,
working on the "Save The Family Farm
Act." For a young man raised on the
family farm in Zwingle, Iowa-you
might say his Washington assignment is
home grown.
BRETI MATTHEWiS
DARTMOUTH COLLEGE
"Leadership" is how Brett Matthews
collectively describes his achievements.
Matthews began his Dartmouth career
by founding and co-directing Students
Against Famine in Ethiopia (SAFE), a
network of 75 colleges nationwide that,
via direct mail and telemarketing, raised
$65,000 for African relief. As a result,
Matthews was appointed to the Board of
Directors of U.S.A. for Africa's student
campaign.
During his sophomore year, Matthews
co-founded and presided over Common
Sense, a campus newspaper designed to
bridge the gap between Dartmouth's
rival right- and left-wing papers. By
negotiating a grant, selling subscriptions
and recruiting staff, Matthews quickly
made Common Sense a viable and
respected voice on campus.
In Matthews' junior year, he was
elected co-captain of the Dartmouth
Varsity Football Team and received Ivy
League honors for play during the
season.

ducted independent research at home
using self-designed and self-constructed
equipment and procedures. He investi-
gated the toxicity of the herbicide Agent
Orange and won first place in environ-
mental sciences at the International
Science and Engineering Fair. Since
then, he's picked up numerous awards for
research in air pollution, chemical tox-
icity, and carcinogenesis. His research
has taken him to settings as diverse as the
Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel
and the Michigan Cancer Foundation in
Detroit.
Spending his junior year in
Kalamazoo's Foreign Study Program,
Kudla is attending the Friedrich Alex-
ander-Universitat Erlangen in West Ger-
many. "International cooperation," he
says, "is the next step in solving environ-
mental problems."
DAVID MANDEDSCHEIO
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
David Manderscheid intends on hav-
ing a career in government service. An

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