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March 27, 1987 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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The Michigan. iDaily -ridy March 27, 1987- Page 15

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I have to admit that when I first heard of the International
Jugglers Club, I laughed. Not that juggling is so funny -
just that I never really considered it more than my roommate
tossing three Sunkist oranges around the dorm freshman
year. Attending the 1987 Midwinter Juggle last Saturday
afternoon, however, changed my opinion of juggling. I
realized that juggling is, indeed, a sport.
As I looked around the Chippewa Racquet Club I
attempted to pick out the typical juggler. To my surprise,
however, there was not one particular type of person.;
attending the event. They arrived from Michigan, Ohio,
Indiana, and Missouri, and they came in all shapes, sizes,
and ages as well. Some juggled the usual beanbags, rings,
and bowling pins, while others chose to be more creative.
Ron Steinberg of Ann Arbor showed me his latest trick: one
pin, one bowling ball and one red peanut M-&-M. Mark
Hamilton, of Akron, Ohio, flew by me on roller skates,
somehow managing to keep three pins moving at the same
time. It seemed that no matter where I looked, someone was
trying something new.
This was the third year for the Midwinter Juggle here in;:
Ann Arbor, but a simiar outdoor event has been held in
Gallup Park for nine years. Paul Kyprie, organizer of the
events, told me that they originated from an informal group
that has met on the Diag for 14 years. "The weather dictates
what we do," said Kyprie, "but that's what makes it so
appealing - there's no real structure."
What I learned that afternoon is that practice makes a
juggler, not books, lessons, or any special talent. It is a
hobby that many people find extremely relaxing. "By
focusing your attention on keeping everything in motion,
your cares and troubles go away," Kyprie said. "There's a e
jazz to it, a rhythm...everything depends on timing."
One thing I heard over and over was that there's no limit
to what you can do juggling. As soon as you master five
balls, there are always six and seven, as well as a variety of
different twists and styles to perfect. It is truly never-
ending.
At one point of the afternoon, another participant asked
me if I knew how to juggle. I tried to escape to go reload
film but he was persistant. Fifteen minutes later I had three
beanbags in the air. I put my camera away and focused my
attention on my newest hobby, juggling.

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People interested in learning how to juggle or just
practicing their skills are welcome to join the U-M Juggling
Club in the Diag every Friday around 3 p.m.

After mastering many juggling techniques, Alan Howard of Cleveland Heights, Ohio, shows that alternative body parts may be used to juggle.

Timing is the key to successful group juggling.

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