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March 25, 1987 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-25

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Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 25, 1987

I

Orchestra has a dream or two

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(Continued from Page 7)
vive...
D: Survive as a professional
organization?
M: Survive, financially, as a
professional organization. What we
would like to do, among other
things, is service communities that
don't ordinarily have the oppor -
tunity to listen to professional
ensemble playing. We would also
like to help young American com -
posers, getting hearings of their
pieces.
We are very concerned about the
education of young children, and
want to instigate a series of chil -
dren's concerts.
We're performing now in the
larger cities because first of all, we
have to establish a reputation, and
it also helps to improve the quality
of the ensemble by being put in the
situations where they are reviewed
by major critics, and where the
audiences are more critical, perhaps.
D: Do you consider yourself a
professional organization, or a
teaching organization?
M: In attitude, we're mostly
students...there are some peole who
are music educators in the group,
and there are also some graduates of
conservatories of music. In those
terms, I would consider that the
people who play in the groups to
be young professionals. As far as in
our approach in attitude and level of

performance, we're always doing are
best to be professiona.
D: How many original com -
positions do you usually incor -
porate into an average program?
M: Usually, we premiere one
work per concert...this program in
Ann Arobor is an exception....
D: Why is that?
M:It just worked outathat way.
We've been doing a lot of
exploration and performance of
baroque music, quite a bit of
classical music, and twentieth-
century music. One area that isn't
fertile in the amount of chamber
orchestra repertoire is the nineteenth
century...what we're doing now is
expanding the orchestra's repertoire,
and in order to do that, I chose to
have...all nineth century music. We
had to expand the orchestra a little
bit; our average performing size is
only 35 members, and as I said,
we'll be using forty-nine.
D: Do you pay your members?
M: No one is paid.
D: Even tour expenses?
M : We have an operating
budget....in order for the orchestra
to survive, we have to create a fi-
nancial network, a support sys -
tem....it's a combination of things.
You have to have private donations,
you have to have corporation help,
you have to have grants...
D: Where is most of the money
coming from now?

M: Most of the money now is
coming from private donors, and as
any other orchestra, we're operating
under a deficit.
D: How difficult is it for a
graduate student of a young profess -
ional to get a job these days?
M : When someone leaves
college, if they want to have an
orchestra performing career, they
have to take an audition., and in
order to take an audition, they're
put in competition with anywhere
from 80 to 150 people, for one
spot...there ends up being a lot of
musicians who finish school, who
have to play in smaller orchestras
or regional orcestras or urban
orchestras for a period of time until
they can create a career for
themselves in an orchestra that will
actually earn them their living.
What we're trying to do is create
a viable outlet for some of theses
peopl, through a chamber orchestra
type of situation that sometimes
performs in a larger setting as we
are in Ann Arbor, creating
opportunites for them to vent their
musical possibilities and to have
experience playing in an orchestra
at a professional level.
D: What has been the response
of musicians to your programs?
M: The people are just amazing.
The attitude is so different from any
orchestra I've either played in or
conducted. They are inspired

people....they want to hear music
performed properly; they want to
hear great music come alive.
D: What does "music performed
properly" mean?
M: I would say that what I
meant by saying properly has to do
with the attitude of approach. Not
that anyone is right or wrong in an
interpretation, because there is no
such right or wrong in music-but
having a proper attitude of being
open to anyrkind of development of
what happens to the music.
In other words, not shutting a
student conductor or a young
conductor as myself, just because
they're young...sure, I'm going to
try it, because maybe it's going to
help me grow as a person and as a
musician.
Having an attitude of wanting to
perform music as the composers
wrote it. In other words, taking as
much from the printed page and
recreating that to the best of their
ability, through an understanding of
the composer's life, through an
understanding of the composer's
other music besides that piece,
through an understadning of that
piece, in all kinds of ways -
theoretically,formalized-every-
thing! It's a total amalgamation of
their knowldege, and a williingness
on their part to try and be faithful
and honest in their interpretation.

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By Lisa Nicholas
No, it's not another Greek Week
stunt! Amazin' Blue will be
performing in the Diag, Thursday,
completely on their own initiative.
The non-University affiliated,
coed ensemble will be singing
between 11:50 and 12:10 on the

steps of the Grad.
If you've ever wondered why
organizations do things like that,
well, in this case it's because they
want the exposure. Amazin' Blue
has been together for two months
now and they want people to get to
know them.
The group was founded by
graduate student Mike Wang, who

WAKE UP!
All LSA students are asked to attend a meet-
ing of their LSA student government council.
The meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on the "
3rd floor of the Union in the MSA chambers.
Student input and participation is essential
in order for the council to work on precise
student problems and to give further support
to the council's efforts to change detrimental
university policies and bolster student life.
Through active involvement YOU can
change your life at the university and have
direct impact on the pressing issues
affecting you.
HUNK-A-MANIA

was involved in a similar organ -
ization at Yale. While the Univer -
sity has two large ensembles, the
Friars and the Harmonettes, neither
one is coed. Wang decided to fill
this gap and began auditions in
January. The thirteen students he
selected range from freshmen to
grad students with a cross section
from music majors to engineers.
He was also responsible for the
name.
Needless to say, a certain ele -
ment of humor pervades the group.
While the main emphasis is jazz
pieces like "Fascinatin' Rhythm,"
the group ventures into pop and
classical take-off, like the "Taco
Bell Canon." The members have
also been known to give im -
promptu performances in Jacksonm

Despite this, the singers are
serious about their music. They
practice twice a week and the
impromptu show occurred during a
weekend retreat dedicated to per -
fecting their performance. They are
also financially supporting their
activities without any outside help.
As their name indicates, the
group is very excited about the
University campus. They hope to
perform at resident hall and
fraternity functions and at Univer -
sity events both on and off campus.
The Diag performance is a first step
in that direction. As their promo - ;
tions director, Noelle Rodgers, said,
they want to be "a real U of M
group."

bars.

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THE BLOOM COUNTY?
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WEDNESDAY
MARCH 25

THURSDAY
MARCH 26

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Admissions Office
Miriam Prum,

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Gentlemen admitted after 11
Tickets $5, available at the Michigan Union
and the door

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