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March 20, 1987 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-20

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Women's Gymnastics
vs. Bowling Green
Tomorrow, 2 p.m.
Crisler Arena

SPORTS

Men's Tennis
vs. Northern Illinois
Today, 1:30 p.m.
Track and Tennis Building

The Michigan Daily

Friday, March 20, 1987

Page 9

Nettei
By ADAM SCHRAGER
As one of the top-ranked teams
in the country, the men's tennis
team would not have to worry
about a match with Northern
llinois, right?
Wrong. Michigan is not taking
today's match lightly. The
Wolverines battle the Huskies at
1:30 p.m. at the Track and Tennis
Building.
Batsmen skki Miami
Special to the Daily
EDINBURG, Texas - The
Wolverines scored seven runs in
the top of the seventh inning to
beat Miami of Ohio, 8-2,
yesterday. The seven-run
outburst was highlighted 'by a
Bill St. Peter double with the
bases loaded. The victory raised
Michigan's record in the Citrus
Tournament to 4-1, 5-2 overall.
Dave Perralta pitched one and
two-thirds innings of shutout
ball to earn the win in relief of
Jim Abbott, who had struck out
six and allowed only one earned
run.
It was the second straight
game in which St. Peter drove in
the winning run with a two-
bagger. On Wednesday, he
capped an 8-7 comeback win
over host Pan American.
Michigan plays St. John's
today and Kansas tomorrow.

'S

to

host

Huskies

Women swimmers
compete in NCAAs

"Every match we play, no matter
who the opponent is, we have to
move ahead," explained Michigan
coach Brian Eisner. "It is a
necessity that we do what we are
capable of doing. We make the
basic assumption that if we perform
well, we will do well. It's very
simple."
THE 17TH-ranked Wolverines
have played well enough so far to
obtain a 9-2 record with their only
losses coming to national
powerhouses California and
Arizona. The victories, however,
have placed them in a spot where
opponents will want to knock them
off.
"It is a tremendous opportunity
for Northern to play a team that is
ranked as we are, " said Eisner, who
is shooting for his 269th career
victory today. "We are motivated to
play well. This is not predicated by
the pressure of having to do well."
The Huskies are also performing
well, but need more consistency,
according to coach Carl Neufeld.
"We are a relatively young and
inexperienced group (no seniors on
the squad)," he said, "so we are just
trying to build every week on what
we already know.
"'It is important for me to work
with these younger players. What I
generally try to do is lay the
foundation for our team in doubles.
This emphasis is usually lacking in
the junior competition. All the

players are highly motivated to play
singles, but our team has taken a
liking to doubles and we have
performed very well in them."
THE STRONG doubles play
and some recently improved singles
play has given the Huskies a five-
match winning streak compiled
over their spring break down South.
Freshman Steve Wiere (17-6),
the team's most consistent player,
and exchange student Emil Bijleveld
(13-10) from Holland play the top
two singles spots and play on the
number-one doubles team. Dan
Bowers (14-9) and Mike Hill (14-9)
play the three and four singles
spots, respectively, and also the
number-two doubles spot.
Junior Ed Nagel (28-6) has
performed well at number-one
singles for the Wolverines, includ -
mg a come-from-behind victory last
weekend against Miami of Ohio.
The Wolverines defeated Miami
behind the easy victory of the
number-two singles player, Dan
Goldberg, and victories by all three
doubles teams.
Women battle WW
To most people, the end of
winter is merely an escape from the
harsh weather. But for the women's
tennis team, the end of winter
provides a chance to avenge a loss
to Western Michigan suffered last
fall.

Broncos in a home match tomorrow
afternoon. When the two teams
clashed last fall, the Broncos
triumphed, 7-2. But there is a new-
found confidence on the Michigan
squad. Tina Basle, the number-one
singles and doubles player for the
Wolverines, said, "It's so hard for
me to compare the way I'm playing
with the way I was playing last
fall. I'm a different player."
"We're improving every week -
end, and I feel very good about our
chances this weekend," said
Michigan coach Bitsy Ritt. "We're
just much stronger than in
November."
DESPITE ITS 8-5 record,
Western Michigan is hurting
because one of its top singles
players, Marla Withfield, is out for
the year with an injury. But the
Broncos do have Jan Wygan (9-0 in
singles) as their number one player.
Wygan is ranked in the top-50
nationally in singles.
Ritt feels that a win at third
doubles is especially important.
"We've been having trouble
winning at that position all year,
and we have a lot of people who
could play there." Ritt. believes that
tomorrow's match could be a good
indicator of the team's progress.
Michigan is riding a two-match
winning streak with victories over
Eastern Michigan and Toledo last
week.
-WALTER KOPF

' By CHRIS GORDILLO
This weekend marks the
culmination of a season for the
women's swimming and diving
team, but perhaps the beginning of
a new era.
The team yesterday entered the
NCAA Championships in
Indianapolis as Big Ten champions
for the first time ever.
Coming off of a conference-
championship meet with over a
100-point victory, Swimmer of the
Year (freshman Gwen De Maat),
Coach of the Year (Jim
Richardson), and Diving Coach of
the Year (Dick Kimball) awards, the
Wolverines are riding high on the
wave of success.
Second-year head coach
Richardson attributes the success to
two factors. "It was a
combination... of a talented
freshman class and a very talented
group of upperclassmen who did a
great job of keeping the freshman
calm and preparing them
emotionally to handle the pressure
and tension," said Richardson.
THE TEAM looks for the
NCAAs to be an "experience-
gathering" meet according to
Richardson. With the majority of
the team underclassmen (including
22 freshmen), the swimmers are
just happy to be part of the meet.
The team has doubled the number
of swimmers to qualify for the meet
this year to eight.
Unlike the inexperience and
youth of the swimmers, Kimball
has four experienced divers

competing in the Championships.
"They have a much better chance
to do well here because they've all
handled the emotional pressure of
national-level competition many
times,"'said Kimball.
Juniors Mary Fischbach and
Bonnie Pankopf, and sophomore
Clara Trammell all are NCAA All-
Americans. Although jdnior Cokey
Smith is competing in her first
collegiate season following back
surgery, she was a U.S. National
Championship finalist.
"On any given day any of the
four have the potential to be
national finalists," said coach
Richardson. "If the team's going to
do anything in this meet the divers
are going to have to lead the way.
They have far more national
experience than our swimmers do."
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The Wolverines play

the

Gymnasts face MSU, Falcons

By JULIE HOLLMAN
In their final regular season
home meets, the men's and
omen's gymnastics teams will try
to smooth out the rough edges in
preparation for the Big Ten
Championships in two weeks. The
women's team will take on
Bowling Green while the men
simultaneously host Michigan
State and Air Force , .Crisler
Arena.
According to Michigan women's
coach Dana Kempthorn, Bowling
Green is a bit of a mystery as its
recent scores have fluctuated
between 174 and 179. But, the
Falcons have recorded their lowest
scores while on the road and
Michigan hopes to capitalize on
this weakness.
The Wolverines (9-5 overall, 1-3
Big Ten) average 177 and will look
to score in the 180 range to build
P he team's confidence. Because
most Big Ten teams consistently

score from 180-182, Michigan
must begin doing the same if it
wants to be successful in the
championships.
DUE TO the high scores
throughout the Big Ten,
Kempthorn would have preferred to
play a conference team. "I would
like to have a little more Big Ten
pressure toward the end of March,"
said ~Kempthorn. "With an easier
team coming in, it's harder to get
psyched up, but even so, we are not
taking (Bowling Green) lightly."
Michigan will test its intended
Big Ten lineup, which will include
the addition of Amy Meyer in the
all-around.
The men also will be faced with
a virtually unknown entity as Air
Force flies into Crisler. Michigan
State is an enigma since it averages
270 but scored an uncharacteristic
278 last week. This sudden
escalation will force Michigan to
compete up to the Spartans' level

in' order to give the them a tough
fight.
A key for Michigan is
performing consistently in all
events. Last week against Western
Michigan, the Wolverines
experienced one of their best
pommel horse showings but then

faltered on the high bar. The
unsteadiness in the normally strong
event cost the team a 270 score.
The Wolverines will look to
Brock Orwig, Tony Angellotti, and
Mitch Rose to deliver 9.0-plus
performances in an attempt to
overcome the Spartans and Falcons.

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UNION
Arts & Programming
This week at the Michigan Union...
March 20-22
Photo exhibit of the children of Pound House:
Anne Sommer, photographer.
10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Fri., Sun., Room 1209
Sat., Lobby of 2nd floor
March 26
Arts at Midday:
American Indian Music and Dance from the
Chippewa and Iroquois Confederacy.
12:15 p.m.
Pendelton Room
Free

\Ax
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7K 2.
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OUT DELIVERY
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665-6005 995-9101

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12" x 18"

FULL SICILIAN
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One Coupon Per Person
Not Accepted at
William St, Restaurant
or Dine in at
The Cottage Inn Cafe
EXPIRES Mar. 27, 1987

7F.DR% Tap Rank,

(MMR$ PALAC*

m mm"i

DOMINO'S
*w.PIZZA
Project Concern's
Walk for Mankind.
P* ectConce nsWalk for Mankind isacommu y-wdevouneerevent
made up of people who want to make life better for people in poverty in
countries all over the world. including the United States. Project Concerns
Walk for Mankind was the first of its kind in America
Funds raised from the Walks enable Project Concern to provide health care
and training for needy people all over the world Project Concerns
grassroots approach to low cost health care teaches people how to take
care of themselves and how to keep their children healthy. Your
communities can benefit through our unique "sharing' agreement.
whereby wakers can donate up to 20 percent of collected pledges to the
nonprofit cause of their choice. In the past. Protect Concerns sharing has
helped schools. churches, local food programs and charities

SUN
PHOTO
PHOTO PROCESSING LAB
PHOTOGRAPHIC PRODUCTS STOCKHOUSE
Black-and-white processing services from
sun photo
Sun Photo hand develops your film and prints 3x5 size
on glossy black and white paper.
Custom black and white prints from prints, negatives or slides.

MARVELOUS SU4
MARVIN RU
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WHAT:
PLACE:
TIME:
DISTANCE:

Washtenaw County Walk for Mankind
Start and finish at DOMINO'S FARMS
Earhart Road (north of Plymouth Road)
Register between 11 am and 2 pm
20 kilometers (12.5 miles)
Average walking time: 3 hours

World Middleweight Championshp
MONDAY, APRIL 6, 1987
HILL AUDITORIUM, 9:00 PM

There will be a Farm Walk of 3 kilometers
for those with less time, small children,
or other obligations.

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