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March 19, 1987 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Photographer shows
lifestyles of the poor

I

The Michigan Daily - Thursdpy, March 19, 1987 - Page 3
Cheerleading
tryout means
smaller team

By ALYSSA LUSTIGMAN
"What is American Pictures?"
asks signs blanketing campus.
On Thursday, March 19, the
University will find out.
Sponsored by Students in Social
Action, American Pictures is a
journey through the side of
America that many of us are
unfamiliar with.
The slide show is a production
using over 4,000 slides. It
contrasts the poverty in the rural
south and industrial north with the
luxurious lifestyles of wealthy
America.
Jacob Holdt, a native Dane, is
the vagabond/photographer/author
who created the production after
seeing a problem with the social
values of this country.

Holdt traveled throughout
America for five years, and has
stayed everywhere from the
mansions of the Rockefellers and
Kennedys to ghettos in cities and
shacks of black Southern
plantation workers. He sold his
blood and plasma once every two
weeks to finance the filming and
pictures.
Students in Social Action hope
to increase the awareness of social
problems in America. Students in
Social Action organizer David
Heller said the group wants to
"arouse social awareness
throughout campus" with the
show, and hopes it will provide
aid to the homeless and solve the
racial problems occuring in Ann
Arbor.

U' reviews tenure
family, Lindberg said, adding that period similar to Michigan's,
lengthening tenure review will put according to German Prof. Marilyn
off this decision evenfarther. Fries, a member of the American
Most universities nationwide Association of University Prof-
have a seven year tenure probation essors.
ThE LIST
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Donovon Neil, member of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, chants with
B.A.M. supporters outside the Union yesterday. The group imposed an
economic boycott of the building.
BAM revival begmins

By REBECCA COX
The University's men's
cheerleading squad will be cut from
12 members tol0 next fall in
accordance with Big Ten rules. The
cut will become effective tonight as
a committee appointed by Don
Canham, Director of Athletics,
chooses new members.
The committee consists of Don
Treviline, the squad's current
advisor, Bob DeCarolis, an
administrative associate in the
Athletic Department; Howard Brab-
son, an associate professor in the
School of Social Work; and Bob
Darden, the men's gymnastics
coach, according to Brad Frey. Frey
is this year's co-captain along with
David Kaplan; both are also on the
committee.
Canham could not be reached and
Brabson would not comment.
Both Frey and last year's coach
Bob Seymour said the committee
members are unfamiliar with cheer-
leading.
Treviline said, "I've been with
the squad forsover a year, I think I
should know something by now."
In the past, new members were
chosen by the team's captains, the
coach, and senior members. Neither
Frey or Seymour knew why
Canham created the committee this
year.

According to Frey, "They're
stripping down the program to its
bare bones. We were looked up to
by other squads in the nation, but
now by only having ten people we
won't be able to enter a national
competition."
The team ranked fifth in the
nation at the National Cheerleading
Association's competition last
January.
According to Seymour, reducing
the number of members would
limit the amount of stunts
cheerleaders can perform. Frey feels
that stunts become more dangerous
with fewer members performing it.
"They (the Athletic Department)
want us to be cheerleaders like we
were in the 70s," Seymour said.
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Located at:
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(Continued from Page 1)
their demands are appropriate but I
don't think others of them are. And
the businesses in theUnion are
private enterprises ... and for the
benefit of all the students.
"I don't think they have any
complaints of discrimination by the
businesses in the Union (and) I
don't think the Union is an
appropriate place for this," he added.
BAM organizer Barron Wallace

said the protest was held to
demonstrate Black students' power
and unity. "We're sure we won't
economically deprive the Union of
very much today, and even if we did
they'd get it back tomorrow: the
point is when we do need to resort
to (boycotting) the Union or the
University of something, 400-plus
people here will be mobilized to do
it."

Campus Cinema
Hamlet (Lawrence Olivier, 1948),
CG, 7:00 p.m., MLB 4.
Olivier's brilliant adaptation spices
up the Bard with lots of physical
action and sceney-chomping.
Sid And Nancy (Alex Cox,
1986), MTF, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m.,
Mich.
The second best movie of last year
was a deeply disturbing but hilarious
look at the tender romance betwixt
Sex Pistols bassist and designated
hitter Sid Viscious and professional
groupie Nancy Spungen.
The Mountain Cat (Ernst
Lubitsch, 1923), AAFC, DBL/7:00
p.m., Aud A.
An anti-war satire with surrealism
and expressionism and all those other
-isms that make Lubitsch such a
well-respected guy.
Heaven Can Wait (Ernst
Lubitsch, 1943), AAFC;, DB O/9:00-
pm., Aud A.
Don Ameche plays a Don Juan who
is sure his sexual appetites make
him a shoo-in for eternal hell fire.
And Now For Something
Completely Different (Ian
MacNaughton, 1971), Med, 7:30 &
9:15 p.m., Nat Sci.
If you're already a Python fan, don't
bother; this is all just stuff clipped
from their TV show. If you're not a
Python fan, run down to Nat Sci just
as fast as you can and see what
you've been missing.
The Toughest Job You'll
Ever Love, Peace Corps, 7:30
p.m., International Center.
Former volunteers will be on hand to
answer questions after the flick,
which documents Peace Corps
experiences in Asia, Africa, and
South America.
Performances
Chistopher Keen- Arts at Mid
Day, 12:15 p.m., Michigan Union,
Pendelton Room.
Alice Lloyd Talent Show-
Alice Lloyd Student Government, 9
p.m., Red Carpet Lounge, Alice
Lloyd Hall, (764-1172).
Speakers
David Winter- "Leadership and
its Relationship to Liberal
Education," Residential College,
7:30 pm., 126 East Quad.
Grzegorz Lindenberg-
"Legitimacy in Soviet-Style
Societies," Center for Russian and
East European Studies, noon, 4051
LSA Bldg.
Donald Steiner- "Genetic and
Evolutionary Aspects of Hormone
Biosythesis in the Islets of
Langerhans," 4 p.m., Towsley
Center, Dow Auditorium.
Jacob Holdt- "American
Pictures: Povery and Racism in
America," 6 p.m., Rackham
Auditorium.
Sembo Kokun- "Status in the
Traditional Japanese Orchestra: The
Case of A Female Drummer," The
Center for Japanese Studies, noon,
Lane Hall Commons Room.
Shengke Wang and Brenda
Wojciechowski- "X-Ray Absor -

NMR Spectroscopy," Dept. of
Chemistry, 4 p.m., 1200 Chemistry
Bldg.
Susan Weinberg- "Archeo -
logical Excavations in Southeastern
and Central Anatolia," 7 p.m., 3050
Frieze Bldg.
Dr. Ruth Steward- "Polarity in
the Drosophila Embryo," Dept. of
Biology, noon, 1139 Nat. Sci. Bldg.
Jeffery Parsons- "More on
Maguey: An Ethno-Archaeological
Approach to Pulque Production in
Highland Central Mexico," noon,
2009 Museums Bldg.
John Seeley- "Evaluating the
Effectiveness of Training Programs,"
American Society for Training and
Development, 7:30 p.m., Sheraton
University Inn.
Donald Symons- "A Critique of
Darwinian Anthropology," 3:30
p.m., 35 Angell Hall.
Joanne Goodwin- "The Fem -
mist Art Movement: Cultural
Politics," noon, 238A West
Engineering.
Meetings
Women in Communications-
4:15 p.m., 2050 Frieze.
Michigan Economic Society-
5 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Committee for Social
Progress in Riop San Jaun,
Nicaragua and the Inter -
national Appropriate Tech -
nology Assn.- 5:30 p.m., 4202
Michigan Union.
Hebrew Speaking Club- 4
p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
External Relations
Committee- 7 p.m., 3909
Michigan Union.
U of M Voice of Reason- 6
p.m., Michigan Union, 4th Floor
Lobby.
Furthermore
Impact Jazz Workshop- 7
p.m., Michigan Union Ballroom.
Computing Course- "Intro -.
duction to Tell-A-Graf," 7 p.m.,
4003 SEB< (747-2424).
Free Tutoring- All 100-200
level Math, Chemistry, Physics, and
Engineering courses, 7 p.m.-11
p.m., 307 UGLi; 8 p.m.-0 p.m.,
South Quad, Main Dining Hall.
Safewalk- Night time safety
walking service, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.,
102 UGLi of call (936-1000).
Compufar- 9 a.m.-5p.m.,
Michigan Union Ballroom and
Pendelton Room.
Rugby Football Club- 8 p.m.,
The Coliseum, Corner of Hill and
Fifth,(996-4529).
"Destroying Racism: The
Administration Won't- How
Will We?"- Open Forum, 7
p.m., 443 Mason Hall.
Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The List," c/o
The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.,
48109. Include all pertinent in-
formation and a contact phone
number. We must receive an.
nouncements for Friday and
Sunday events at least two weeks
before the event, and announ-

Services disturb city residents

(Continued from Page 1)
fraternity's status to staff shortages
that often prevent the department
from enforcing city codes. "En-
forcement is not a high priority in
the way I spend my time," she said.
Pierce said "It's unfortunate but
we have a lot of laws on the books
which are poorly enforced. I wish
we did a better job enforcing them."
"I'd like to tell you that if I'm
re-elected that will change," he said,
drawing laughter from the crowd of
40. City elections will be held on
April 6.
Pierce's opponent, Council-

member Gerald Jernigan (R-Fourth
Ward), said the city should add more
staffers and perhaps pay citizens to
help enforce city services.
Jernigan reiterated his support
for adding more police officers to
combat the city's crime rate, which
rose 17 percent in 1986. Pierce has
questioned whether adding officers
would help reduce crime.
Ray Detter, a local resident, said
he is concerned about the crime rate
and asked the candidates if they
would support a city tax on the,
Nectarine Ballroom, Taco Bell, and

other businesses that he said attract
troublemakers.
Neither candidate supported the
tax. Pierce said it would restrict the
business's civil liberties.

I

I/

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
COMMITTEE CHAIR
APPLICATIONS
Impact Jazz Dance
Soph Show
Comedy Company
Starbound
Tech. Crew
Viewpoint Lectures
Special Events
Ticket Central
Michigras
Laughtrack
Mini-Courses
MUSKET
Mediatrics
Homecoming
College Bowl
Soundstage

I

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by 5:00 Friday March 20, 1987
sign up for interview date and time
for more information, .call 763-1 107
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER

Lar MARCH 18, 19 & 20 tte 11-4

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I

GO FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.

The hardest thing about break-
ing into professional-
music is -well, break-
ing into professional
music. So if you're
looking for an oppor-
tunity to turn your
musical talent into
a full-time perform-
ing career, take a
good look at the
Army.
It's notjfS
all parades
JJA.~ TN .

of 40 performances a month, there's
also the opportunity for travel-
not only across America, but possibly
abroad.
Most important, you can
expect a first-rate pro-
fessional environment

read music, performing in the Army
could be your big break. Write:
Chief, Army Bands Office, Fort
Benjamin Harrison, IN 46216-5005.
Or call toll free 1-800-USA-ARMY.

aw

I

;
,hT ;,-,ter,-~ _

a .c

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