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March 18, 1987 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-18

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 18, 1987 - Page 5
IPPS conference focuses on global affairs

(Continued from Page 1)
the emerging field of public policy
as a practical way to apply education
to the surrounding world.
Last week's conference on
"Effects of U.S. Policy on Inter-
national Economic Development"
provided an opportunity to learn
about U.S. trade, aid, and in-
vestment policy, while also empha-
sizing one of the major aspects of
the institute's program - student
involvement.
For the past three years, IPPS
students have planned and pro-
grammed such a conference from its
inception to its concluding remarks.
Although the program is divided
into both domestic and international
studies, this is the first year that the
now annual student conference has

focused upon global issues.
Featuring Rep. Howard Wolpe
(D-Mich), chairman of the house
subcommittee on Africa, the
conference focused upon topics
ranging from agricultural policy to
the Carribean Basin Initiative. "It
was a great success for not only for
the institute, but also for the
University and community," said
Dan Swanson, co-chair of the
conference and a second-year IPPS
student.
"Looking at U.S. policy with an
international perspective was a great
way for the international part of the
institute to spread its wings,"
Swanson added.
Traditionally, two-thirds of IPPS
students concentrate upon domestic
issues, while only one-third focus

We have a o percent attrtion rate brcause of the
tremendous services that students, faculty, and alumni
provide for each other. .z . n
a Yolanda Lizabri-Marino
assistant director of student affairs, IPPS

the program: "We have a 0 percent
attrition rate because of the tre-
mendous support services that stu-
dents, faculty, and alumni provide
for each other.
"This cohesive program tends to
act like a big family," she added.
The institute is a program, not a
school, with approximately 25
faculty members who must be
appointed and teaching in another
department - usually economics,
political science, or engineering.
"In a way we are trying to train
what we can't hire, but it also has
its advantages," said Courant, re-
ferring to the program's inability to
hire a public policy specialist over

upon the global perspective. This
year, though, half of the program's
participants are involved in the
international arena.
This represents a change from
when IPPS first took over the
Institute for Public Administration,
which had been established in 1914.
In those days, the institute was the
first in the country to educate city
managers with such a program of

public administration, but now
IPPS had taken a distinction with a
more global perspective.
"Many students never consider
public policy, but it's exactly what
they would want to get into to
apply what they are learning,"
Swanson said.
According to Yolanda Lizabri-
Marino, assistant director for stu-
dent affairs, IPPS students stay in

an economist. "Because none of the
faculty can exclusively identify
with the institute, it encourages the
students to take more of an active
part in defining what thoy want
their education to be," he added.
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Grotrian says lobbying will be effective

(Continued from Page 1)
"(The proposal) is on their
",minds right now and to have people
lobbying will really impact upon
them," she said.
Harvey Grotrian, director the
University's office of financial aid,
feels the lobbying will encourage
legislators to vote against the cuts,
vhich he said would have a
:disastrous effect on student aid
BAM -issues
threat to 'U'
(Continued from Page 1)
needed to better the lives of Black
"students on campus, since all of the
racist incidents recently publicized
have been perpetrated against
Blacks.
"We want Black students to be
able to program and advocate for
themselves, said Charles Wynder,
a spokesperson for the movement.
The demands utilize the creative
input of Black students on campus,
he said.
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programs if implemented.
"Our experience is when
legislators hear directly from stu-
dents, they react very positively,"
Grotrian said.
Accprding to Grotrian, student
lobbying has been effective in the
past in derailing legislation unfa-
vorable for the University. He said
in 1982 student pressure reduced a
proposed 50 percent cut in appro-
priations to an actual cut of 5 per-
cent for the University.
"There's nothing like student
presence in Washington," Grotrian
said.

Business School junior John
Gaber, University lobbyist and
treasurer of the Michigan Student
Assembly, said he and the other
eight University students not only
lobbied against aid cuts but also
lobbied for legislation beneficial to
students.
He said the University contin-
gent lobbied for pieces of legis-
lation that would repeal the taxation
of scholarships, grants, and interest
payments on student loans. The
students also lobbied in favor of
Speaker of the House Jim Wright's
(D-Texas) budget proposal that calls

for $1.3 billion increase for higher
education.
MSA President Kurt Muenchow,
another lobbyist, said he felt his
and other student's efforts were
effective in gaining support against
Reagan's proposal because the stu-
dents were able to tell legislators in
person the effects of the cuts.

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