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March 16, 1987 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-16

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 16, 1987 - Page 5

FLASH party
David Sternlicht
for President
John Villanueva
for V.P.

Blue party
Seth Klukoff
for President
David Vogel
for V.P.

Bigfoot party
David Newblatt
for President
Charles Heckstall
for V. P.

Students First
Ken Weine
for President
Rebecca Felton
for V.P.

Racism hits

cal

Stand on is-Lie/party

1. Is there a line between campus and non-campus issues ? yes no yes no
2. Do you want MSA to handle campus issues only? yes yes yes no
3. Do you support the current ban on classified military research
that has the purpose of killing or maiming human life? yes yes yes yes
4. Do you wish to extend this ban to unclassfied military research? yes no yes yes
5. Do you support a refundable fee for PIRGIM through MSA? no no yes yes
6. low many non-white candidates does your party have? 2 1 9 6
t 7. H-low many women does your party have? 9 3 5 10
8. How many candidates does your party have total? 20 15 16 24
9. I-low many candidates in your party have experience in MSA,
either as elected officers or committee members? 3 6 8
10. How many years of experience does your party have in total? 7 1 6 12
11. Are there circumstances in which your party would work for a
student strike to shut down the University if necessary to stop the
implementation of a non-academic code of conduct? yes no yes yes
12. If it seims that the University administration is not doing
much to combat racism and'the United Coalition Against Racism
(UCAR) calls for a student strike this year similar to the strike in
1970 that shut down the University, would your party work for
#that strike? yes maybe yes Yes
13. Do you think MSA should fund political groups, such as the
College Democrats and Republicans? no yes yes yes
Daily Graphic by HENRY PARK
Calm marks MSA elections

(Continued from Page 1)
The administration denies that it'
has backed down on a commitment
to civil rights, with Assistant At -
torney General William Bradford
Reynolds saying last month: "We
have had for the last six years the
most active and energetic law en -
forcement program in the field of
civil rights in our history."
SEVERAL widely publicized
incidents brought the issue of
campus racism to the fore.
Last October at The Citadel, a
military academy in Charleston,
S.C., five cadets dressed as mem -
bers of the Ku Klux Klan broke
into a black freshman cadet's room,
shouted obscenities and left a
burned paper cross.
Weeks later, white students at
the University of Massachusetts in
Amherst attacked 10 black students
in a brawl following the New York
Met's World Series victory over the
Boston Red Sox.
THIS MONTH, racial tension
at the University of Michigan
prompted a hearing on that cam -
pus's problems. Among the inci -
dents: fliers declaring "open season"
on blacks, racist graffiti, and a stu -
dent disc jockey who broadcast ra -
cist jokes.
A check of campuses across the

country suggests a more extensive
problem:
-On Jan. 26 a cross was burned
in front of Purdue University's
Black Cultural Center. On Feb. 11,
the words "Death Nigger" were car -
ved into the office door of a coun -
selor in the School of Sciences.
-At Northern Illinois University,
11 students face possible suspen -
sion for racial harassment, and the
university is offering a $500 reward
for the identification of those re -
sponsible for distributing racially
offensive posters and fliers.
-A University of Colorado fra -
ternity faces sanctions for distri -
buting a poster on Martin Luther
King's birthday of a black woman
with the caption, "Come Play With
Me."
-A WELLESLEY College
trustee resigned in February after
students protested her remark that
black employees at her firm pre -
ferred selling drugs to working.
-Vanderbilt University ordered its
fraternities and sororities in January
to make a good-faith effort to in -
tegrate racially and ethnically or be
shut down.
sA former black student filed a
discriminations charge against
Pillsbury Baptist Bible College in
Minnesota, alleging that the school

disciplined him and other blacks
more harshly than whites, and that
he was forbidden by school officials
to date a white woman.
-University of Virginia students
said in a campus poll this winter
that racism is the school's biggest
problem.
-LAST YEAR at Penn State
University, photocopied fliers with
a coiled white snake and the words
"Don't tread on me, blackie" ap -
peared on campus, and some black
students complained of receiving
anonymous racist phone calls.
LAz P HC.RA"'C5 o (CoF" NG U RINTING U BNDIN G FORmiS
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GRAND OPENING SPECIAL
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By MARTHA SEVETSON
The name-calling and poster
wars which drew students' attention
,to ┬░last year's Michigan Student
Assembly election have been
replaced this year by two weeks of
lukewarm publicity and minor
procedural complaints.
LSA junior Hilary Farber, chair
of MSA's Women's Issues Com -
mittee said the lack of controversy
will probably reduce voter turnout
in the elections, which begin
tomorrow. "If I wasn't involved
-with MSA this year, I'm not sure
" "I'd know there was an election
going on," she said.
Farber said the controversy last
-year involved more students in the
election. "I don't think there is any
group that's gotten to enough of
the students," Farber said. "If
-Anything, the PIRGIM question
will get people to vote more in the
election. They have gotten out
posters far better than any other
party.
Posters linking one party to a
Marxist organization and com -

plaints about the use of a character
from "Bloom County" to advertise
the another party provoked an
intense competition between the
rival groups last March.
Farber said postering around
campus became a "crazy contest."
"Everyone was tearing down
everybody's posters, and fights were
breaking out," Farber said.
THE only complaints reported
this year are accusations of early
campaigning or failure to register
posters with the election director.
John Villanueva of the FLASH
party accused the Students First
party of campaigning before March
3, the first official day of
campaigning, and Julie Murray of
the Students First party filed the
same claim against FLASH. Both
parties were fined.
The campaign tactics that
dominated last year's election led to

the establishment this year of an
election court to settle candidates'
disputes. The Office of Student
Services handled the complaints last
year.
"Because of the election court,
the election director has much more
support," according to Bruce
Belcher, chair of MSA's Rules and
Elections Committee. "Mudsling -
ing can be stopped before it gets
out of hand."
In addition, a new election rule
demands that all campaign material
be turned in to the election director
before it is distributed. Both the
Bigfoot party and the Student
Committee for Reform and
Progress hung posters before
getting approval, but only the
Bigfoot party was fined.
"It seems that all the groups are
making minor infractions," said
Belcher. "It's pretty balanced."

WOMEN AND MEN NEEDED TO
FACILITATE WORKSHOPS
ON SEXUAL ASSAULT
*STUDENT LED WORKSHOPS
* LEARN VALUABLE COMMUNICATION AND FACILITATION SKILLS
* TRAINING PROVIDED
Applications available at the Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center
3100 Michigan Union * For more Info call: 763-5865 * App. due: 3/19

et ahead on your summer look I
* ~ TANNING CENTERS I
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on campus:
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665-9009

FIRST OF THE WEEK
SPECIALS

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Winter Term 1987 Calendar of Events
WEDNESDAY, March 18. "Winter Colloquium Series on Schooling and Intel-
lectual Development" - Tribute Room, 1322 School of Education Building,
4to 5 p.m.
Speaker: Dr. Giyoo Hatano of Dokkyo University, Japan, on ''Bridging the Gap Between
Formal and Informal Knowledge."
Free: for information, contact the Center for Research on Learning and Schooling, 3112 School of Education Building,
or call (313) 763-2374.
WEDNESDAY, March 18. "Administrator's Update: Science from the Princi-
pal's Perspective"- Ann Arbor Inn, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Speakers: Prof. Burton Voss, U-M science educator, and invited administrators and
teachers in service.
Cost: $15 for University of Michigan EESA Title II Science and/or Math Institute participants; $30 for others. Fee
includes lunch. Intended for principals and other instructional leaders in elementary and/or middle schools. For infor-
mation, contact Professional Development Office, 1225 School of Education Building, or call (313) 763-9497.
FRIDAY, March 20. "Intelligence and Schooling" - Rackham Amphitheater,
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Speakers: Morning session - Sandra Scarr, psychologist, University of Virginia and Rich-
ard Shweder, anthropologist, University of Chicago; afternoon session - Zhang Houcan,
psychologist, Beijing Normal University and Robert Sternberg, psychologist, Yale University.
Free; for information, contact Prof. Scott Paris at the Center for Research on Learning and Schooling, 3112 School of Educa-
tion Building, or call (313) 763-2374.
WEDNESDAY, March 25. "Alumna in Residence" - School of Education
Building.
Speaker: Gwendolyn Calvert Baker, BA '64, MA '67, PhD '72, executive director of the
YWCA of the U.S.A., and member of the New York City Board of Education.
Arrangements have been made for informal contacts by Dr. Baker with School of Education students and faculty
throughout the day. For details, contact the Dean's Office, 1111 SEB, or call (313) 763-4288.
WEDNESDAY, April 1. "Winter Colloquium Series on Schooling and Intellec-
tual Development" - Tribute Room, 1322 School of Education Building,
4to 5 p.m.
Speaker: Robert Glaser, University of Pittsburgh, on "Expertise, Knowledge, and
Instruction."
Free: for information, contact the Center for Research on Learning and Schooling, 3112 School of Education Building,
or call (313) 763-2374.
WEDNESDAY, April 1. "Administrator's Update: Mathematics from the Prin-
cipal's Perspective" - Ann Arbor Inn, 9a.m. - 3 p.m.
Speakers: Prof. Joseph Payne, U-M mathematics educator, and administrators and
teachers in service.
Cost: $15 for University of Michigan EESA Title 11 Science and/or Math Institute participants; $30 for others. Fee
includes lunch. Intended for principals and other instructional leaders in elementary and/or middle schools.
This and the March 18 workshop on science are a series. Cost for both sessions is $25 for EESA participants
and $50 for others.
For information, contact Professional Development Office, 1225 School of Education Building, or call (313) 763-9497.
FRIDAY, April 3. School of Education A wards Ceremony - Schorling Auditor-
ium, School of Education Building, 2 p.m.
Speaker: Dr. Foster B. Gibbs, Superintendent of the Saginaw Public Schools,
(Topic to be announced).
r_ _ _ ,., .... ,t..11 : - 7A- - a 4,.. _C.,- 11,,11 . - - - r 'i n ..r: n R :n - -- n n r ll ,i ,d_? (.

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