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March 13, 1987 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-13

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T
Page 8-The Michigan Daily- Friday, March 13, 1987

Records

Local publisher aims

Dolly Parton, Linda
Ronstadt, and
Emmylou Harris
Trio
Warner Brothers
As far as musical genre, one
could say this is pretty traditional
Country/western. Very embellished
country/ western, any way you cut
In spite of the big-named
session men like Ry Cooder, David
Lindley, and Albert Lee, in spite of
the three singers, all big names
themselves... nothing happens.
W .
Renta Car
from
Ec one -Cr
We rent to
19 YR. OLD
STUDENTS!
Choose from small
economical cars to
vans.
Special
WEEKEND
rates
Pick up services
upon request
We accept
cash deposits
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
ECONO-CAR
438 W. Huron
761-8845
ANN ARBOR

The material on this album is
reasonably varied; there are
compositions from Jean Ritchie,
Jimmie Rodgers and others, as well
as two by Parton, and a couple of
traditionals. Some cuts work better
than others. "The Pain of Loving
You," a Parton/Porter Wagoner
song works well as one of the two
true 'trio' cuts on the album, nice
and flowy with an unobtrusive
acoustic guitar solo from Albert
Lee. Ronstadt's rendition of Linda
Peters Thompson's haunting,
incredible "Telling Me Lies" is
indeed haunting and incredible.
On the, other hand, Phil
Spector's "To Know Him is to
Love Him" is a real scary exercise
in futility and tediousness. "I've
Had Enough" from Kate McGarrigle
could drive even the most devoted
listener into the land of ZZZs or up
a tree. And the rest of the album is
pretty tepid.
The big trend in country music
these days, it seems, is harmonious

groups of singin' women... the
Judds, the Girls Next Door,
Sweethearts of the Rodeo, and the
Forester Sisters are fairly successful
examples. But while Harris, Parton,
and Ronstadt have all recorded
something that catches the ear with
a good hook, or intrigues with a
great arrangement, or knocks you
over with the beauty of her voice,
well, you don't see much of that
here.
With the exception of the first
and last cuts, Trio does not contain
any actual trio singing, but instead
one of the three women on solo
with the others backing her up with
harmonies. Among other things,
this album is very safe, which is
too bad - all three possess great
voices. But they never get adven-
turous, never cut loose. Most don't
move much beyond elevator music.
Heck, I'd rather listen to
Sweethearts of the Rodeo, the
Judds, or Nanci Griffith any day.
-V.J. Beauchamp

high with

'The Others'

By Wendy Kaplan
Say goodbye to Richie Rich.
The affable, affluent young
comic book hero just might have to
make room for another two-
dimensional character. This one
represents a social conscience. He is
better than man in every respect.
Stronger, smarter, more empathetic
and sympathetic, he is one of The
Others, a fantasy comic book with
a political flavor.
Created by Cormac Publishing,
a newly-formed, Ann Arbor-based
publishing house, The Others
takes a 180 degree turn away from
traditional superhero comic books.
Through a group of characters who
are "Cro-Magnon to our Neander -
thal," Others creator Mark C. Perry
addresses the idea of corruption,
which he believes is the result of
power. His characters possess all
the qualities they need to take over
the world: strength, intelligence,

and a certain amount of supernatural
ability. The resulting story
concerns what these characters do
with such power. In a sense, he
parallels western civilization and its
means to conquer the ills of the
world with the comic book's main
characters.
Perry denies the black and white
relationship between good and evil.
Life, says the author, is not so clear
cut. His storylines revolve around
themes such as rape and vengeance.
Yet, he is hardly glorifying these
hideous realities. Quite the
opposite.
"I can't stand the glossing over
of violence," says Perry, empha -
tically. "When violence is there [in
the comic book], it's going to be
ugly because that's what violence
really is."
For those of us who grew up
with Archie, Jughead, and the Hulk,
the idea of a political comic book,
especially one that depicts graphic
violence and uses language Bob
Guccione would cringe at, is hard to

swallow. Comic books, after all,
have always been escapist
entertainment. Who wants to escape
into a world worse than our own?
However, Perry feels that comic
books are precisely the medium
through which we can express our
grievances.
"Comics allow people to be
outspoken without being preachy,"
he says. "Ours will have no
limitations. We don't believe in
censorship."
Joining Perry in this publishing
venture are Christine Perry, the
president of Cormac, and publisher
Brian Berkley. In addition to The
Others, Cormac will be putting out
a magazine called F--- Art Let's
Dance, which will combine short
stories, interviews, and comic art
with fantasy and science fiction as
predominant themes.
Cormac also plans to produce
other fantasy works, including War
of the Dragon Clan and Manifest
Destiny, both graphic novels by
Mark C. Perry. In addition, Perry,
Berkley, and Perry hope to expand
beyond the genre of comic book
fantasy.
"Comics are just a starting
point," says Berkley. "What we're
looking for is good writing."
As of yesterday, you can find
The Others on comic book stands
around the country.
WEEKEND
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

MAC IN THE MORNING

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-NJ
MAC IN THE EVENING
MAC AROUND THE CLOCK
kinko'

OPEN

24 HOURS

SELF-SERVE
MACINTOSH CENTER
e FULL-SERVICE LASERSETTINGe
RESUME SPECIALS
540 EAST LIBERTY STREET
ANN ARBOR
CORNER OF LIBERTY AND MNAYNARD
761-4539

(

The Mannes College of Music
150 WEST 85TH STREET NEW YORK, N.Y 10024 * 212-580-0210

gJ$LEY

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AUDITION DATES:
January 1986 (by arrangement)
March 5, 6, 7, 8, 1986
May 21, 22, 23, 1986
September 1986 dates
to be announced.
Scholarships are available.
M.M., Post-Graduate Diploma,
B.M., B.S., Diploma.

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Major Fields of Study

SATURDAY, MARCH 14
9 pm-lam
Mary Markley Dorm

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_ Vies

Ensembles in Residence
The Galimir String Quartet
The Mannes Trio
PIANO
Edward Aldwell
Arkady Aronov
David Bar-Illan
Claude Frank
Richard Goode
Jeannette Haien
Eugenia Hyman
Lilian Kallir
Leon Pommers
Marie Powers
Josef Raieff
Peter Serkin
Nina Svetlanova
Diane Walsh
HARPSICHORD
Kenneth Cooper
Eugenia Earle
ORGAN and
CHURCH MUSIC
Ford Lallerstedt
McNeil Robinson
William Whitehead
TYMPANI and
PERCUSSION
Norman Grossman
Howard Van Hyning
Chris Lamb

STRINGED
INSTRUMENTS
Nina Beilina, Violin
Raphael Bronstein,
Violin and Viola
Isidore Cohen, Violin
Felix Galimir, Violin
Shirley Givens, Violin
Ani Kavafian, Violin
Dora Schwarzberg, Violin
Sally Thomas, Violin
Hiroko Yajima, Violin
Paul Doktor, Viola and Violin
John Graham, Viola
Sol Greitzer, Viola
Kim Kashkashian, Viola
Karen Tuttle, Viola
Timothy Eddy, Violoncello
Gary Hoffman, Violoncello
Paul Tobias, Violoncello
Julius Levine, Double Boss
Homer Mensch, Double Bass
VOICE
Charles Bressler
Thomas Cultice
Peter Elkus
Ellen Faull
Antonia Lavanne
Dan Marek
Marian Thompson
Theodor Uppman
CLASSICAL GUITAR

WOODWIND and
BRASS
Andrew Lolya, Flute
Thomas Nyfenger, Flute
John Wion, Flute
Elaine Douvas, Oboe
Albert Goltzer, Oboe
Mark Hill, Oboe
Ronald Roseman, Oboe
Gervase de Peyer, Clarinet
Peter Simenauer, Clarinet
Burt Bial, Bassoon and
Contrabassoon
Harold Goltzer, Bassoon
Judith LeClair, Bassoon
Allen Won, Saxophone
Myron Bloom, French Horn
Antonio lervolino, French Horn
Ranier Deintinis, French Horn
Philip Myers, French Horn
Mel Broiles, Trumpet
Vincent Penzerella, Trumpet
James Smith, Trumpet
John Ware, Trumpet
Joe Alessi, Trombone
Per Brevig, Trombone
Gilbert Cohen, Trombone and
Bass Trombone
Donald Harwood, Bass Trombone
Warren Deck, Tuba
ORCHESTRA and
ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING

COMPOSITION
Charles Jones
David Loeb
Peter Pindar Stearns
David Tcimpidis
Frederick Wer6
TECHNIQUES
OF MUSIC
Elizabeth Aaron
Edward Aldwell
Terry Champlin
Robert Cuckson
Douglas Diamond
Leo Edwards
David Gagne
Charles Jones
Ford Lallerstedt
Larry Laskowski
David Loeb
Mei-Mei Meng
William Needelman
Frank Nemhauser
Marie Powers
Felix Salzer
Carl Schachter
Eric Wen
Frederick Werl6
HISTORICAL
PERFORMANCE
PROGRAM
CHAMBER MUSIC

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