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March 12, 1987 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-12

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 12, 1987 - Page 3

RHA elects officers

By ELIZABETH ATKINS
Members of the Residence Halls
Association last night held
elections for executive officers, who
will take over April 1.
LSA sophomore Fouzia Kiani,
Helen Newberry Hall representative
for RHA, was elected president in a
vote of six-to-three against East
Quad representative Adam Waldo,
an LSA freshman. Kiani will
replace current president Becky
Lawrence, an LSA junior.
"I'm excited to work," said Kiani
after the elections. She said her
involvement with the RHA ad hoc
party policy committee, which

helped insititute more liberal party
guidelines, heightened her interest
in student leadership.
Kiani said she feels her
experience in dealing with housing
officials on the ad hoc committee
prepared her for the presidential
position. She said her goals during
the new term will be to maintain
professionalism and efficiency in
RHA's affairs with administrators
and during meetings, to encourage
member participation, and to
increase student awareness of RHA
and its functions.
Brian Sheehy, an engineering
sophomore and East Quad rep-

resentative, was elected vice
president in a eight-to-one vote over
LSA junior P.J. Petitpren, Martha
Cook's representative.
Sheehy will replace LSA
sophomore Mark Davalos, RHA's
current vice president.
Ken Andrysiak, an engineering
sophomore, ran unopposed for
secretary. He will replace the
current secretary, Dan Tobocman, a
freshman engineering student.
Carlene Garcia, a Stockwell
representative, ran for treasurer
unopposed and will replace LSA
freshman Nancy Moehlman.

UCAR questions investigation

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Feeling Supreme
U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, third from left, serves as chief justice on a panel of
distinguished officials during the final round of the law school's Campbell Moot Court Competition, yesterday.
r ica rees Detroit reveran

(Continued from Page i) thrn T TnivPre;ty anti hnilti twn new

DETROIT (AP) - Family and
friends of a suburban Detroit
missionary imprisoned in the South
African black homeland of Transkei
since Dec. 17 expressed relief and
gratitude following his release early
yesterday.
The State Department notified
U.S. Sen. Carl Levin's office
yesterday morning of the release of
the Rev. Casimir Paulsen, Levin
said.
Paulsen's sister, Valerie Bullock
of Dearborn, said the news came as
a relief -"that's to say the least."

"I just couldn't bleieve it when I
heard," said Bullock, who first heard
the news from her cousin in
Chicago who had been notified by
the State Department.
Paulsen is a Roman Catholic
missionary from Dearborn Heights,
where his order, the Marianhill
Order, is based. He has worked in
Africa since 1966 and has been in
Transkei since 1978.
His associates at the Marianhill
Order also expressed gratitude at his
release.
"We're tremendously relieved -

that's an understatement," said the
Rev. Aloysius Blonigen.
Szura and Blonigen said they
heard about Paulsen's release from
news organizations and had no
official confirmation. They said
they had not been contacted by
Paulsen but expected they will be
among "thousands" he will
eventually call.
Paulsen yesterday was in
Umtata, the capital of Transkei, and
was expected to go tomorrow
afternoon to Johannesburg.

The coalition also wants to know
whether the University will take
similar action if other incidents
arise.
According to University
Associate Vice President for
Student Services Thomas Easthope,
"Releasing the name (of the
student) serves no purpose. I'm not
sure the University would ever
release the name." He refused to
discuss what information might
eventually be released.
Students in the United Coalition
Against Racism plan to advance
their cause on legislative and
symbolic fronts.
Citing numerous racist incidents
on campus and the University's
failures to provide an adequate non-
racist atmosphere, UCAR members
said they will soon file a class
action civil rights lawsuit against

the unisuitan su vullu LWV an
shanties in the Diag this Friday.
On Saturday, UCAR members
plan to hold a teach-in at the
Michigan Union with workshops
on student activism, protests and
the law, and how the University
works.
Last week, UCAR members
gave acting President James
Duderstadt a list of 12 demands

designed to improve racial relations
at the University. UCAR members
demanded a response within two
weeks, at the next Board of Regents
meeting on March 19.
The week marks the 17th
anniversary of the Black Action
Movement (BAM) strike. The
BAM movement forced the
University to pledge funds to attain
ten percent black student
enrollment.

TUESDAY LUNCH LECTURES
12 NOON
ot the
INTERNATIONAL CENTER - 603 E. Madison
March 17: PROF. MARC ROSS, Ph.D.,
Professor of Physics, L.S.&A.,
"A FACULTY PERSPECTIVE ON POLICY IMPLICATIONS"
Sponsored by
THE ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CANTER & THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER

,i
What's happening in Ann Arbor today

FBI cautions profs. of bombs

Campus Cinema
The Point (Fred Wolf, 1970),
Med, DBL/7:00 p.m., Nat Sci.
Heavy animated allegory about a
little boy who lives in a world
where everything is pointed except
his own head, so he and his dog
Arrow (straighter than narrow) go
-. ,offon a quest to find a wh. "L
Mary Poppins (Robert
Stevenson, 1964), Med -DBL/8:30
p.m., Nat Sci.
The Disney adaptation about a
flying nanny who helps out a
family in London.
Lady Windermere's Fan (Emst
Lubitsch, 1925), AAFC,
DBL/7:00 p.m., MLB 4.
An upper-crust woman fears her
husband is having an affair but,
hey, she's no angel herself. Based
on a play by Oscar Wilde. Silent.
Broken Lullaby (Ernst
Lubitsch, 1932), AAFC,
DBL/9:00 p.m., MLB 4.
A French musician kills a German
soldier, and is so guilt-ridden he
goes to Germany to live with the
dead man's folks.
The 25th Annual Ann Arbor
Film Festival, CG, 2:00, 7:00,
9:00, & 11:00 p.m., Mich..
Different entries with each
showing. The 2:00 show is free.
Performances
Yvette Green- Arts at Mid
Day, 12:15 p.m., Michigan Union,
Pendelton Room.
Pianist Green plays Motzart Sonata
K310 in C minor and A and a
selection of Ravel waltzes.
U of M Jazz Band- 8 p.m.,
Rackham Auditorium, (763-4726).
Conducted by Louis Smith, the
r Band will perform Jazz classics.
Iodine Raincoats- 9:30 p.m.,
U-Club, (763-1107).

English Language and Literature, 8
p.m., Rackham East Conference
Room.
Maurizio Tosi- "Corners of
Arabia: Coastal Archaeology in
Yemen and Oman in Search of a
Strategy," noon, 2009 Museum
Bldg.
Mary Jackson- "Financial Aid
Fireside: An Information Session,"
noon, 3026 School of Public
Health.
Theresa Foley, Sylvia
Hacker, and Julie Steiner-
"Impact of Rape Culture on
Faculty Women," noon, Michigan
League Dining Romms 4-5.
Meetings
Society of Women
Engineers- 6:30 p.m., 1213
East Engineering.
Ann Arbor Historic District
Commission- 4:30 p.m.,
Kempf House Center for Local
History, 312 South Division St.
U of M Voice of Women- 6
p.m., Michigan Union, 4th Floor
Lobby.
Committee for Social Progress in
Rio San Juan, Nicaragua and the
International Appropriate
Technology Assn.- 5:30
p.m., 4202 Michigan Union.
External Relations
Committee- 7 p.m., 3909
Michigan Union.
Furthermore
Rugby Football Club- 8
p.m., Coliseum, Corner of Fifth
and Hill, (996-4529).
Computing Course-
"Introduction to Tell-A-Graf," 7
p.m., 4003 SEB, (747-2424).
Career Planning &
Placement- "Exploring
Opportunities in the Business
Sector," 4:10 p.m., 32oo SAB,
(764-7460).
Macrobiotic Cooking-7:30
p.m., Ann Arbor "Y", (663-0536).
Graduate Student Presenta -
tions- Anne McGuire- "Helping
in Biological and Social
Relationships;" Liisa Kyl-Heku-
"Heirarchy Negotiation;" Meg
Symington- "Ecological Correlates
of Party Size in the Black Spider;"
Doug Jones- "Selfish Memes,"
3:30 p.m., 2053 LS&A Bldg.

(Continued from Page1)
delivered in the past nine years,
including the one sent to Professor
McConnell two years ago, were
sent by the same man. There's no
doubt about that," he said.
McConnell and other University
professors do not feel especially
threatened by the mail-bombing
trend.
"The number of bombs has risen
by 50 percent nationwide in each of

the past two years. I -don't feel
threatened because lightning never
strikes the same place twice,"
McConnell said.
Director of Campus Safety Leo
Heatley said 11 bomb threats were
reported here in 1986, which is
average. This January, four bomb
threats were reported, though none
involved University professors. The
threats involved University-owned
housing.

,/-
. ,X
6-.,
C- .

a ±'. ,

,x

Part of TH
Chon

E POWER SERIES at the POWER CENTER
reography by Gay De langhe. Bill De'oung.

Speakers
Clyde Goulden- "Ecological
Impact of Lipid Accumulation by
Zooplankton," Depy. of Biology, 4
p.m., 3056 Nat. Sci.
Lauren Weingarden-
"Naturalized Nationalism: A
Ruskinian Discourse in the Search
for a New American Style of
Architecture," 7 p.m., Angell Hall,
Auditorium A.
Mona Simpson- "Reading
From Her Work," Visiting Writers
Series, 5 p.m., Rackham West
Conference Room.
Sean Ledden- "Cross- Cultural
Employment," Center for Japanese
Studies, noon, Lane Hall
Commons Room.
Nejat Seyhun- "Economics in
Turkey," 7Fp.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Marilyn Fries- "Narrating the

Tickets:M'ch'ganUnion TicketOffice.Jessica Fogel. Murray Louis AMarch 12. 13. 14 at p i.
All Ticket World/Ticket Master Outlets,
SchoolKid's and PJs Used Records March 15 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $8 and $5. $3 fr students with . D.
h oncerts manepossibleinpart by a grant rom the Naimnai Enaowment for he Ars at the League Ticket Office. Michigan League Building 764-045o
The Department of Philosophy
The University of Michigan
presents
SIXTH ANNUAL MICHIGAN COLLOQUIUM IN PHILOSOPHY
HOBBES
and the
JUSTIFIED STATE
Friday, March 13, The Michigan League, the Michigan Room
David Guathier, Department of Philosophy, University of Pittsburgh
HOBBES'S SOCIAL CONTRACT 1:00 PM
Commentator: Daniel Farrell, Department of Philosophy, Ohio State University

Sena announcements of up-
coming events to "The List," c/o
The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.,
48108. Include all pertinent in-
formation and a contact phone
number. We must receive an-
nouncements for Friday and
Sunday events at least two weeks
beforenthe event,and announ-
cements for weekday events

Jean Hampton, Department of Philosophy, University of California, LA
HOBBES'S EXPLANATION OF THE STATE
Commentator: Donald Herzog, Department of Political Science, University of Michigan

3:30 PM

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