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March 12, 1987 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-12

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NCAA Tournament

Preview -See pages 10.11

Ninety-seven years of editorial freedom
VOLUME XCVII - NO. 110 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN - THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 1987 COPYRIGHT 1987 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UCAI?

*demands
detals
of probe
By STEVE BLONDER
and EUGENE PAK
demadin the Uiversiyrla al
of the information, including the
circulating a racst flie in Couzens
Hall.
Marty Ellington, a leader of the
United Coalition Against Racism
(UCAR), said his group wants the
University to release all of the
details of the investigation because
"we can't blindly take the
University's word. They've proven
time and time again that they'll say
nething one day and do another
Ellington said the coalition
wants the information so it can
understand the University's process
for dealing with racial incidents.
See UCAR, Page 3

Committee
to oversee
admissions
Lack of admissions
input irks LSA faculty

Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
ABC interview
LSA junior Marc Lewis was one of the students interviewed about racism by ABC television reporters on the
Diag yesterday. While admitting that United Coalition Against Racism's reaction to racist incidents on cam-
pus was justified, he said, "Of course there's bigotry . . . but people should be able to take it for what it's worth
and be secure for themselves."

Racism may inhibit enrollment

By PAUL HENRY CHO
Fourth in afive-part series.
"If you go to U of M, you might get
lynched."
Among the students at Cass Technical High
school in Detroit, this statement is usually
uttered as a joke. But it reveals an underlying
apprehension among minority high school
students about the University and its racist
incidents during the past few months.
University administrators are concerned that

publicity about recent racist incidents here may
dissuade prospective minority high school
students from attending the University and
inhibit efforts to increase minority enrollment.
"We must tell minority students that they
are welcome, and that racist incidents cannot
and will not be tolerated at this University. We
must assure them that we are working hard to
create a positive environment," said Richard

Some minority high school students,
however, are not sure the fears can be soothed
so easily.
Dominique Sims, a senior at Cass Technical
High school considering the University, is wary
of coming here.
"Prior to the events, there was no question
that I wanted to go to the University of
Michigan. But since these issues have arised,
I'm reevaluating my choices," Sims said.
See POTENTIAL, Page 2

By MARTIN FRANK
University Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost
James Duderstadt plans to set up an
executive committee to oversee the
undergraduate admissions office.
The decision follows complaints
from two committees - the
Undergraduate Admissions Task
Force and the Admissions Steering
Committee - about their lack of
input in admissions policy.
"I anticipate that this will be a
permanent, standing committee
with major impact on undergraduate
admissions policies and practices,"
Duderstadt wrote in a letter to the
Academic Affairs Advisory Coun-
cil.
According to LSA Dean Peter
Steiner, 80 percent of students
admitted to the University through
the admissions office are in LSA,
and members of the Admissions
Steering Committee are frustrated
that their recommendations to the
admissions office have not been
taken seriously.
"It's no secret that LSA faculty
is unhappy about their lack of
influence with the admissions
office," said Steiner.
History Department Chairman
Thomas Trautman, a member of the
Admissions Steering Committee, is
upset because the admissions office
raised the amount of students
accepted into LSA from 3,000 to
3,200 this past year, despite his
committee's pleas to freeze the
number at 3,000 until the
University relieves the shortage of
classroom space and increases the

number of faculty members.
Undergraduate Admissions Direc-
tor Cliff Sjogren said that the
admissions officers carry out the
standards set by the faculty.
"We're (the faculty's) agent.
They tell us to seek out certain
kinds of students and we seek them
out," said Sjogren.
English Prof. H. Don Cameron
thinks that the admissions office
has not been effective enough in
their policies.
"Their operations are open to
criticism, and there are some
definite peculiarities in the
admissions policy," said Cameron.
Cameron said that some
prospective honors students have
found the counseling of the admis-
sions office to be poor, dis-
couraging them from enrolling
here.
Duderstadt's University-wide
committee will consist of students,
senior faculty members experienced
with admissions issues, and
associate or assistant deans.
Steiner thinks a majority of the
members will be from LSA because
the high numbers of LSA students
admitted through the admissions
office. Steiner will nominate
members of the Admissions
Steering Committee and the task
force to Duderstadt's committee,
and then disband the task force and
the steering committee.
The new committee will
recommend to Duderstadt issues
that "can affect the quantity,
quality, and mix of our new
freshmen and transfer students,"
Duderstadt said in the letter.

Kennedy, University
government relations.

vice president for

AIDS
affects
new risk

By EVE BECKER
When Acquired Immune Defi-
ciency Syndome was first diagnosed
in 1981, its victims were primarily
homosexual and bisexual men, and
intravenous .drug users. But
following predictions that the
disease will spread throughout the
population, national attention has
been switched from "high-risk
groups" to "high-risk behavior."
Officials are saying that groups

such as heterosexual young adults
run the risk of contracting AIDS
through unsafe activities.
According to a recently-issued
report by the Institute of Medicine-
National Academy of Sciences
(IOM-NAS) Committee on AIDS,
"The youth of the nation, emerging
into the sphere of sexual activity
and becoming potential customers
in the illicit drug trade, must be
alerted to the existence of the

disease and its mode of trans-
mission."
THE REPORT said edu-
cational programs must be expanded
and diversified to include groups
currently at a risk and those which
will soon be at a risk. It also called
for $1 billion in research funds each
year for AIDS research and for the
establishment of a national com-
mission on AIDS.
See AIDS, Page 5

groups

I

FBI

Students.First takes

warns 'U'
Sscientists
of bombs
By STEVE BLONDER
The Ann Arbor office of the FBI
plans to warn prominent University
scientists to be on the lookout for
packages that might contain
explosives, according to an FBI
agent.
The warning stems from a nine-
year investigation of 13 bombing
incidents in six states, including
one incident at the University
which targeted researchers connected
with airplanes or computers.
Special Agent James Riley, a
member of the national law
enforcement team tracking the
bombings, said he is "not
suggesting that people here at the
University have been targeted."
But he said the possibility exists
because "of the unique make-up of
the (research-oriented) community."
As a result, the FBI is notifying
people who work with computer
research and engineering to be alert
for suspicious mail or packages
,hirh hve.s ~. ntor rriaraA

grassroots
By MARTHA SEVETSON
Editor's Note: MSA candidates
for president and vice-president will
debate tonight in a Daily sponsored
forum in the Pendleton room of the
Michigan Union at 7:00
MSA QP7
ELECTION 0

9

Weine
... emphasizes experience

Leadership experience and a
"grassroots" approach to student
contact are the foundation of the
Students First party platform for
the Michigan Student Assembly
election on March 17 and 18.
"Experience can be learned, but

approach
we understand the assembly, and we
understand its workings, its
limitations, and its resources," said
vice-presidential candidate and LSA
junior Rebecca Felton.
Felton has been an LSA
representative to MSA since her
freshman year, working on the
Women's Issues Committee and the
Student Rights Committee and
currently serving as co-chair ofthe
Communications Committee.
She helped establish the Sexual
Assault Prevention and Awareness
Center on campus, proposed the
extension of the Nite Owl bus
service, and edits the MSA Campus
Reports newsletter.
See STUDENTS, Page 5
INSIDE
Change of leaders in Haiti has
not brought relief for the Haitian
people.
OPINION, PAGE 4
Painting meets the Dance
Department in "Gallery Dance."
ARTS, PAGE 7

Racial incidents lead to
renewed code speculation

By REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
As the University administration
searches for a response to recent
racial attacks, speculation has arisen
that a code to control student
behavior outside the classroom has
become more iminnent.

said.
Although none of the Uni-
versity's executive officers con -
firmed a timetable for future code
discussion, Robin Jacoby, as -
sistant to vice president of academic
affairs, confirmed that the
controversial issue has heen

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