100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 10, 1987 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 10, 1987 - Page 3
-is

'U' k icks
student
out of
dormitory

that have focused national attention
on racism at the University.
The student's confession was
obtained last week when he was
confronted by housing inves-
tigators, said Archie Andrews, a
housing associate director. Andrews
said the student was evicted under a
provision in residence hall leases
that forbids violating "University
regulations."
The student violated a Board of
Regents bylaw that bars discrimin-
ation based on race, color, or creed,

Andrews said.
Although the student told
University officials he was sorry for
the incident and didn't realize its
ramifications, minority students
who were in the lounge when the
flier was distributed did not accept
his apology.
minority
students said they thought the
student's punishment was suf-
ficient.

Klukoff: MSA needs to
(Continued from Pae 1(

vvaaw..x:uc a ax vxaxa a6c a

"We rebuilt The Michigan Review,
and we'd like to take that
experience, transfer it to MSA, and
rebuild MSA on campus," he said.
Working on the publication has
also given him and Vogel detailed
knowledge of the proposed non-
academic code of academic conduct
and the channels and resources
available in order to lobby for
issues, Kluckoff said.
Vogel is an MSA engineering
representative, has been on Engin-
eeringcouncil for a year and a half,
end is an active member of the
national engineering honors so-
6iety, Tau Beta Pi.
Some of the new activities they

propose in order to increase student
awareness and activity include:
-Rotating MSA meeting loca-
tions by holding the meetings in
dorms once a month, so students
can easily attend them.
-Issue forums, which would be
held regularly to explain such
issues as the code, racism, sexism,
and the housing crunch.
-Bringing more groups into the
legislative process of MSA. They
would like to see college student
governments communicate more
with MSA.
-A non-voting student regent,
elected by the students.
The Blue party believes it is
impossible to separate politics from

ain respect
MSA, but that the assembly should
focus on the major issues facing
students.
"Let's debate what is said in the
resolution, not whether or not we
should be passing it," Klukoff said.
"If we can eliminate bickering over
resolutions we can really start to
turn around attitudes about MSA."
The Blue party's approach to the
code involves regaining the Board
of Regents' respect for MSA - a
unique tactic in the election.
Kluckoff believes increased student
participation in MSA committees
will convince the regents and
administration that the assembly
does represent the views of most of
the students.

Candidates
By EVE BECKER
Members of the Lesbian-Gay
Political Caucus of Washtenaw
County met last night with three
Ann Arbor City Council candidates
to discuss increased harassment and
violence directed at homosexuals on
and off campus.
Jim Toy, a coordinator for the
University's Lesbian and Gay Male
Programs Office, said he invited the
candidates to address the gay
community's concerns about recent
harassment, an AIDS policy for
city employees, and overall human
POLICE NOTES
Assault
Ann Arbor police are
investigating an attack on a
University student in an alley next
to the State Theater late Sunday
afternoon, for refusing to participate
in a drug deal, according to Sgt. Jan
Suomala. The victim, an 18 year-
old male, was asked by an
acquaintance to participate in a drug
trade. The victim refused and was
stabbed in the abdomen.
Attempted robbery
A group of youths assaulted a
bicycle rider in the Diag early
Sunday morning, according to Ann
Arbor police. The 26 year-oldmale
was struck repeatedly in the face by
the eight youths who attempted to
steal the victim's bicycle and tape
recorder.
Break-ins
An apartment in the 1100 block
of South University was broken
into between 4 p.m. on March 6
and 11 a.m. on March 8, according
to Suomala. The intruder entered
through a window and stole cash
and some soda bottles.
by Steve Blonder

adiscuss ga3
rights of the gay community in
Ann Arbor.
Mary Reilly, a Democratic
candidate in the Second Ward; Anne
Marie Coleman, a Democratic
candidate in the First Ward; Isaac
Campbell, a Republican candidate
in the Third Ward; and a
representative from Richard
Layman, a Democrat running in the
Fourth Ward, attended the informal
meeting.
The candidates addressed concerns
that Ann Arbor is seeing increased
intolerance and harassment toward

concerns
gays and minorities. People at the
meeting also complained that city
hall and the police department are
not effectively addressing
gay/lesbian concerns.
Reilly said she favors a strong
enforcement of the city's human
rights ordinance and the in-
volvement of the gay community
in the political life of the city.
Campbell said he plans not to
differentiate between the gay/lesbian
community and the "straight"
community when determining city
policy.

40

hA. ..

m

Air

Duderstadt to reject LSA proposal

(Continued from Page 1)
initiative money that LSA's most
important needs, such as course
overcrowding, would be neglected.
Because of overcrowding, said
n-ornback, many professors are
unavailable to help all their
students. Many faculty members
regard the problem as the most
serious facing the college.
Hornback said that since student
enrollment is relatively fixed, the
best solution would be to hire more
faculty.

But there was faculty dissent at
the meeting. Political Science Prof.
John Kingdon said of the proposal,
"It's self-indulgent administration
bashing, and I won't participate in,
it."
Chemistry Prof. Peter Smith
thought some of the initiative
money should go to repair buil-
dings, and buy new equipment.
"We are unable to give the same
materials to students that they could
get in a smaller college in
Michigan," he said.

LSA Dean Peter Steiner will
present Duderstadt with the
faculty's recommendation by April
1, but Duderstadt, nevertheless,
intends to have LSA departments.
bid for the initiative money.
Duderstadt will make his de-
cision on how to spend the money
by May 1 after one panel of faculty
members and another of 10-12
faculty and students review the
proposals.

leavin' for the summer?
stayin' for the summer?
advertise it in
the summer sublets!
MARCH 27
ONLY $25
Deadline: March 23
Ads may be purchased at The Michigan Daily (8 am - 5 pm).
Also, for your convenience, ads will be sold in the Fishbowl
March 11 & March 18, 10 am - 2 pm.
For more information call 764-0557

THE LIST
M What's happening in Ann Arbor today
Campus Cinema Campus Bible Study- 7 p.m.,
Michigan Union, 3rd Floor Room
Crime Without Passione (Ben.; Unwion 'of Studeits for Israel--

Hecht, 1934), Eyemediae, 8 p.m.,
214 North Fourth.
Claude Rains is a lawyer whose
entanglement in a case may cause
him to commit murder himself.
Also, two short films.
The 25th Anniversary Ann
Arbor 16mm Film Festival,
CG, 7, 9 and 11 p.m., Mich.
Your first crack at seeing some of
the over 80 films which will be
presented up through Sunday in the
oldest 16mm festival in North
Arperica. Every showing features
different films.
Speakersf
T. E. Raghunathan- "Large
Sample Significance Levels With
Multiply Imputed Data," Dept. of
Statistics, 3:30 p.m., 1443 Mason
Hall.
Ziva Galili y Garcia- "Russian
Industrialists in War and
Revolution," Center for Russian and
East European Studies, 4 p.m., Lane
Hall, Commons Room.
Roger Kerson- "News, Politics,
and the Politics of News," 7:30
p.m., 126 East Quad.
Priscilla C. Grew-"Earthquake
Hazards and Nuclear Power Plant
Siting in California," Dept. of
Geological Sciences, 3:30 p.m.,
4001 C.C. Little.
Celia Gilbert- "Reading From
Her Work," Visiting Writers Series,
4 p.m., Rackham West Conference
Room.
Jean Knopf DeRoche- "Being a
Child From an Alcoholic Home, " 7
p.m., Catherine McAuley Health
Center, Education Center.
Meetings
Gay Liberation Political
Theater Troupe- 9:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union, 3rd Floor.
Amnesty International- 7:30
p.m., Michigan Union.
Pro-Life- 7:30 p.m., Michigan
Union, Anderson Room.
Shaking Through: Michigan's
Student Magazine- 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union, Kuenzel Room..

7 p.m., Hillel.
TARDAA(Dr. Who Fan
Club)- 8 p.m., 296 Dennison
Bldg.
United Coalition Against
Racism- 4 p.m., Michigan
Union.
Parent Support Group - 8
p.m., Huron Oaks Chemical
Dependancy Treatment Facility,
5301 E. Huron Drive.
Furthermore
Appropriate Technology in
Films- International Appropriate
Technology Assn., 7 p.m.,
Michigan Union, International
Center.
Career Planning &
Placement- "Choosing Your
Major," 4:10 p.m., 2011 MLB;
"Designing a Resume: Layout and
Printing Options," 4:10 p.m., 3200
SAB; "The Job Search Lecture,"
4:10 p.m., MLB Lecture Room I.
Revolutionary History
Series- "World War II: U.S.
Imperialism Carves Out its Empire,"
7 p.m., 439 Mason Hall.
Blood Drive- 11 a.m.- 4:30
p.m., Michigan Union, Pendelton
Room.
Center for Continuing
Education of Women
Symposium- "Change in the
Lives of Educated Women," 1:30
p.m.-5 p.m. and 7 p.m.-9 p.m.,
Rackham Ampitheater.
Parenting the Difficult
Child- 7 p.m., Ann Arbor "Y".
Computing Class-
"Introduction to Tell-A-Graf," 7
p.m., 4003 SEB, (747-2424).
Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The List," c/o
The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.,
48109. Include all pertinent in-
formation and ascontact phone
number. We must receive an-
nouncements for Friday and
Sunday events at least two weeks
before the event, and announ-
cements for weekday events
must be received at least two
days before the event.

'-
9 //

-X m
i
i.

Annual
Doctoral
Cap & Gown
SALE~
15% off the
regular price!
....on your official
University of Michigan
Doctoral cerimonial garb.

_ .
,
V 1
\

March 12
3:00 - 7:30 pm

March 13
9:30 pm - 3:30 pm

e i

Part (fTH
Cho-

IE POWER SERIES at the POWER CENTER
reography by Gay Delanghe. Bill DeYoung.

I

Jessica Fogel. Murray Louis March 12, 13. 14 at 8 p.m.
March 15 at 2 p.mi. Tickets are S8 and S5 . S3 f)r students with I. D.
at the League Ticket Office. Michigan League Building"; 764-0450

612 E. Liberty
769-7600

I

r

TALLY HALL IS:

A FORM POICE OFFICERWHO
TOOK A NIGHTL RITUAL AND
TURNED IT INTO A DAILY BUSINS.
If you lived and worked in California as a policeman -and developed a liking for frozen
yogurt-what would you do if you moved back to Michigan and couldn't find any?
Forget about it? Try something new? Not Pat Potochick.
Rather than give up, Pat Potochick and his mother Eva decided to
bring this West Coast treat to Ann Arbor-and Tally Hall. r,
This is California Freeze. Serving frozen yogurt cones, shakes, f
drinks, pies, salads and sundaes-with a choice of 27 different
toppings. California Freeze is a California dream come true-
seven days a week.
P~i - r- --A ITn1....tI:i_. . Li..F/ ..,. .LL . .... . ...r:.xa

i-lfv Vo V' OrTWTC

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan