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March 09, 1987 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-03-09

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 9, 1987 - Page 31

Bigfoot promises to
focus on minorities

State mediator enters
GEO contract talks

(Continued from Page 1)
The party platform includes a
plan to fight any code, including a
group to organize demonstrations,
meetings, and letter-writing cam-
paigns.
Newblatt is a member of the
assembly's campus governance co-
mmittee, vice chair of its dev-
elopment committee, and a member
of the University Council, a board
established to draft a code.
Heckstall was the president of
the Markley Minority Affairs
Council, parliamentarian of the
Black Student Union, and is
currently the vice president of
Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity.,
Newblatt and Heks&tal want to
establish a paid student organ-
izations counselor at MSA to help
incoming students ,get involved on
campus. According to Newblatt, if
the students join a group via MSA
they will likely to bind the group

closer to the assembly.
The party specifically addresses
MSA interaction with minority
organizations. And according to
Heckstall, the party has tried to
"emphasize minorities on our
ticket." The party slate includes
seven minority students and five
women.
Heckstall and Newblatt say
Minority Peer Advisors should
receive a stipend in addition to
room and board to attract qualified
minority leaders to those positions.
The party also wants MSA to help
finance a renovation of the Trotter
House, a cultural center for
minority students which has been
plagued by inadequate funds. In
addition, the party favors a
mandatory freshman course to
discuss and combat racism.
Both candidates oppose the
funding of the Public Interest
Research Group in Michigan

HEckstall
...-opposes code
through the assembly. Newblatt
said he thinks PIRGIM should have
been handled through the regents
but will abide by the mandate of the
student body.
The Bigfoot party supports the
"end-use" clause for military
research which prevents research
that can kill or maim human
beings, and a mechanism to enforce
it.

By ANDY MILLS
The Graduate Employees Org-
anization and the University, failing
to reach a contract agreement after a
week of negotiations, have decided
to bring in a state-assigned med-
iator.
The existing contract between
the GEO, which will represent the
University's 1700 teaching ass-
istants, and the University has been
extended indefinitely. Either side
can terminate the contract on seven
days' notice.
Talks will resume after the
mediator, Edmund Phillips, can be
contacted and a date set. Phillips,
of the Michigan Employment
Relations Commission, mediated
talks between the GEO and the
University during contract negotiat-
ions last fall.
According to Richard Dees, a

member of the GEO bargaining
team, the two sides are "still pretty
far apart" on the issues, including a
tuition waiver, a salary increase,
limitations on class size, and paid
TA training.
When talks ended Thursday
night, the GEO proposal asked for a
full tuition waiver - the current
waiver is 56 percent of in-state
tuition - a salary increase of eight
percent next year and 6 percent the
following year, paid training for
new TAs, a departmental-set limit
on class size, and an extension of
the tuition waiver for the Spring
and Summer terms.

The University's final offer,
according to Dees, is a salary
increase of zero percent and an
increase in the tuition waiver of tens
percent in 1987-88 as well as a
two-and-a half percent salary raise
and an additional eight percent
tuition waiver the next year.
In each of the past three years;
the graduate tuition has increasedo
eight percent, more than the rise in
the national inflation rate.
The GEO will hold a general
membership meeting on Thursday,
where the contract negotiations will
be discussed.

BUSINESS

Blacks face racial bias
(Continued from Page 2) One former University student
rather than being drawn away from who spoke at the Hood hearing
general campus life, black students said, "My reasons for leaving the
,ho are active in black University are as complex as the
organizations "manage to create and racism that exists here." When
maintain favorable social relat- asked to be interviewed, she
ionships with blacks and whites, declined, saying her experiences at
faculty and students." the University were too
These students tend to have emotionally draining for her to
better interpersonal skills, which relate them.
lead to a greater involvement in Royster said students who have
both black student life and campus experienced such compound
student life in general, according to obstacles sometimes feel
Allen. stigmatized by their situation, and
Other Students may be reluctant to vocalize their
Barbara Robinson, who as frustrations.
Minority Student Service "You're damned if you need
representative sees many students help, and you're damned if you
:daily, said she is concerned about don't get help," she said.
the students who "fall through the Robinson emphasized that other
cracks" - the students for whom minorities and special group
the University can be an students, such as those from rural
overwhelming place and who may areas, may also face this social and
leave college. cultural displacement.
Of the 203 black students who "It's not necessarily a racial
entered the University in 1979, thing. You don't have to be black
only 119 (58.6 , percent) had to feel uncomfortable here in Ann
graduated by 1985. While the six- Arbor, it's a matter of adjusting to
year retention rate has been an unfamiliar situation," Robinson
improving each year, it is still far said. But she emphasized that black
below the 74.5 graduation rate for students face the greatest set of
all students. obstacles in adjusting to a new
Allen notes that although environment.
academic difficulties were cited by And the adjusttne'nt can be
studentas,.4iApiary g s, Nusiutrating. 4 -
other students leaving the One student recently asked
University, these academic Royster, "'When am I just going to
problems are rooted in other factors be all right just the way I am?...
such as "cultural shock" or I'm not going to be too black or
"difficulty of social adjustment." . too poor. When am I just going to
Thirty-two percent of the be all right?"'
students called "feelings of isolation
or lack of asssociation with blacks" Tomorrow: the University's
the most serious problem they face. minority policies and programs.

ARE YOU THINKING ABOUT
APPLYING TO
GRADUATE SCHOOL AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION?
If yes, come to a meeting:

WHEN:
WHERE:

Wed., March 11, 6 p.m.
Room 1322 (Tribute Room)
School of Education Bldg.

Faculty and staff will be available to answer questions
about programs, financial aid opportunities, and
admission requirements.
Ifyou have questions, call:
OFFICE OF ACADEMIC SERVICES
(313) 764-7563
1228 School of Education Bldg.
MEDICAL
SCHOOL
SCHOOL
NIGHT
UM, WAYNE, & MSU MEDICAL SCHOOL -
UM & U of DETROIT DENTAL SCHOOL
ADMISSIONS DEANS & STUDENTS HERE...
INFO ON ADMISSIONS, PREPARATION,
CAREERS AND MORE...
THURSDAY, MARCH 12
7PM - 9 PM
2nd FLOOR, ANGELL HALL

WE WORK AS
LATE AS YOU DO
kinko's
Whenever you need clear, quality copies. come to
Kinko's. Were open early open late, and open
weekends.
When vou re working late, its good to know you re not
working alone.
Gkinko's
Great copies. Great people.

OPEN 24 HOURS
540 E. Liberty
Across From Mich Theater
761-4539

OPEN EARLY OPEN LATE
1220 S. University
Across From Village Corners
S 747-q070

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Campus Cinema
The Films Of Charles & Ray
Eames, Eye, 8:00 p.m., 214 N.
4th.
One's a creative genius of furniture
design. One's a painter. And they're
both filmmakers, as witnessed to -
night through several short subjects
on toy-making, communications
technology, and architecture.
Max Havallar (Fons Ronemaker,
1978), C2, 7:30 p.m., MLB3.
Film about corruption in Dutch-
controlled West Java. Dutch and
Indonesian with subtitles.
The Innocents (Jack Clayton,
1961), MTF, 7:45 p.m., Mich.
A governess (Deborah Kerr) takes
charge of two young children, and
begins to suspect that either she is
going crazy or the tiny siblings are
spawns of Satan himself. Based on
Henry Miller's Turn of the Screw.
Speakers
Peter Wolczanski- "Transition
Metal Alkoxides: Revelalnce to
Metal Oxides," Department of
Chemistry, 4 p.m., Room 1200,
Chemistry Bldg.
Amous Maue and Kelly
Sleadd - Reading from their
works, Guild House Writer's Series,
8 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Kay Kaufman Shelemay -
"The Music and Liturgy of the
Falashes," Center for Near Eastern
and North African Studies, noon,
3050 Frieze.
Anatol Rapoport - "The Study_
of Conflict," Urban, Technological
and Environmental Planning, 4
prn., Amphitheater, Rackham.

Meetings

Christian Science Organiza-
tion Meeting - 7:15 p.m.,
Michigan League.
University Lacrosse Team
Practice - 6-8 p.m., Colliseum.
Asian Studies Undergraduate Asso -
ciation First General Meeting - 8
p.m., basement, Lane Hall
Commons Room.
Furthermore
SAFEWALK - Night time
Safety Walking Service, 8 p.m.-1:30
a.m., Room 102, UGLI (936-1000).
"Developing a Job Search
Network" Workshop - Career
Planning & Placement, 4:10 -5
p.m., CP&P (764-7460).
"Resumes for Creative
Fields" Workshop - Career
Planning & Placement, 4:10-5 p.m.,
CP&P (764-7460).
"Black Greek Letter Societies
and Their Role on Campus
and Society at Large" Forum
- Phi Beta Sigma, 8-10 p.m.,
Pendleton Room, Union (764-7491).
Exploration of International
Appropriate Technology As-
sociation Library - IATA, 7-9
p.m., Room 4202, Union (665-
5244).

' i

PRE-PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
A UNIT OF STUDENT SERVICES

It's not just your
summer.
It's your fuiture.
DIAL 1-800-228-2028, EXT. 205
Discover the NYU Summer. We offer the nation's most com-
prehensive summer session and an exhilarating climate for
scholarship and growth.
Choose from more than 1,000 undergraduate and gradir-
ate courses in the liberal arts and sciences, film, television,
communications, performing arts, business and public admin-
istration, and continuing education.
Study with distinguished faculty members in outstanding
academic facilities that provide a catalyst for academic
achievement.
Live right on campus in historic Greenwich Village with
our special discount rates on summer housing (as low as $200
for the summer if you carry 6 or more credits per session).
And take full advantage of the ongoing summer activities we
have planned-with the opportunity to explore New York
City and its rich diversity of people, resources, and ideas.
The NYU Summer. It's not just your summer. It's your
future. To find out more, return this coupon or call toll free
1-800-228-2028, ext. 205.
1 EARIVATEUNIVERSITYIN THE PUBLIC SERVICE

F
t. *~

Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The List," c/o
The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.,
48109. Include all pertinent in-
formation and a contact phone
number. We must receive an-
nouncements for Friday and
Sunday events at least two weeks

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Office of Summer Sessions
P.O. Box 909, Cooper Station
New York, N'.Y. 10003-9903

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